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Define your film taste in 10 films or less.... 
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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
MunichMan wrote:
I would really like to see some more input to this thread. I have already put a few films on my list because of recommendations from here, it would be nice to gather a few more.

Also, my egotistic soul craves validation for my own list. ;)


Munich,
When I posted this question, my hope was exactly what it seems to have been for you, a place where some film lovers with overall good taste and some strong opinions could share some films they feel everyone should see, both for quality and personal reasons. I'm glad this has worked for you. As for your picks....

Memento is an all time fave for me, one I like to revisit every year or so and enjoy all over again.
Casablanca is as close to a perfect film as there is
LOTR is epic in all the best sense of the word
GF 1/2 Among the top 5 greatest american films
Princess Bride is a great choice. One of my all time feel good films

Glengarry Glen Ross is an absolute class in acting. Just superior writing and performances
Bound is a really underrated film, simply because of the lesbian sex. I think not enough people take it seriously because of that. Its like if you say you like the movie, its only because of the girl/girl fun.

I have not seen the other three but I will take note of each, thanks for the tips.

Joe


Tue Apr 27, 2010 11:24 pm
Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
In Bound, the lesbian angle adds a whole new, complex dimension to the film, and is in no way gratuitous. Neither is the sex, which is tastefully shot (just love the shadow-play). Don't get me wrong, it is hot as hell and will satisfy anybody's prurient interests, but it is key to the power of the movie and the development of the characters.

As I said, a nearly perfect modern noir. Speaking of noir, I love the inclusion of Brick on someone else's list. That is definitely worth a look.


Wed Apr 28, 2010 4:20 am
Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
MunichMan wrote:
In Bound, the lesbian angle adds a whole new, complex dimension to the film, and is in no way gratuitous. Neither is the sex, which is tastefully shot (just love the shadow-play). Don't get me wrong, it is hot as hell and will satisfy anybody's prurient interests, but it is key to the power of the movie and the development of the characters.

As I said, a nearly perfect modern noir. Speaking of noir, I love the inclusion of Brick on someone else's list. That is definitely worth a look.


I completely agree about Bound, I was just commenting on how many others who have not seen the film react when hearing the title.


Thu Apr 29, 2010 2:21 pm
Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
Not in any specific order, I'm too picky on ordering.

5 must sees:
The Fly (The 1986 version)
Lady Vengeance
Sunset Blvd.
Dr. Strangelove, or: How I learned to stop worrying and love the bomb
The Shining

5 movies I personally love:
Ed Wood
Jacob's Ladder
VideoDrome
Army of Darkness
Monty Python's Life of Brian (I actually think this one is better than "Holy Grail" and am sad I know so many Holy Grail/Flying Circus fans who've never even heard of this one)


Mon Jul 05, 2010 11:19 pm
Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
I'm seriously digging this thread.

Okay, 5 must-see films:

1. 2001: A Space Odyssey
2. Schindler's List
3. Rear Window
4. Pulp Fiction
5. Bonnie and Clyde

5 films I unabashedly love:

1. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
2. LoTR Trilogy (It's essentially one long film, so I don't think it's cheating)
3. Dr. Strangelove
4. Goodfellas
5. Finding Nemo


Sat Jul 24, 2010 3:15 pm
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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
5 Must Sees:

1: Goodfellas
2: Pulp Fiction
3: Apocalypse Now
4: Dr. Strangelove
5: Do The Right Thing

5 That I Love and Encourage Others To See

1: Fight Club
2: The Big Lebowski
3: Dark City
4: Precious
5: Sin City

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Fri Apr 15, 2011 3:55 pm
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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
Jeff Wilder wrote:
1: Fight Club
2: The Big Lebowski
3: Dark City
4: Precious
5: Sin City


Fight Club? Christ you can't shake a bush on the internet without five Flight Club devotees falling out.

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Fri Apr 15, 2011 4:58 pm
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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
JamesKunz wrote:
Jeff Wilder wrote:
1: Fight Club
2: The Big Lebowski
3: Dark City
4: Precious
5: Sin City


Fight Club? Christ you can't shake a bush on the internet without five Flight Club devotees falling out.


That's because its an excellent film ;)


Fri Apr 15, 2011 10:25 pm
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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
Hmmm ok

Five classics:
The Third Man
Casablanca
The General
The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence
The Seven Samurai

Five that I love:
Serenity (also a classic, the best sci fi movie ever)
The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford
The Hidden Fortress
Annie Hall
The Lives of Others

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Fri Apr 15, 2011 11:06 pm
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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
firefly wrote:
Hmmm ok

Serenity (also a classic, the best sci fi movie ever)


Okay even I'm starting to get annoyed at my own negativity by now, but...

How on earth can you say that? My favorite movie is Zulu (1964) but is it the best war movie ever made? No, it just happens to be my favorite. In what universe is Serenity the best scifi movie ever made? It's a good film, but it's also a spinoff which sometimes has trouble standing on its own. It has a terrific villain but underutilizes the majority of its cast. It makes little attempt to use science fiction to explore our current reality or make some comment about humanity (aside from a little "bureaucracy/leaders are corrupt" boilerplate) and barely comes to a conclusion. But you find it better than...everything else in the genre? Madness.

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Sat Apr 16, 2011 7:28 pm
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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
JamesKunz wrote:
firefly wrote:
Serenity (also a classic, the best sci fi movie ever)


Okay even I'm starting to get annoyed at my own negativity by now, but...

How on earth can you say that? My favorite movie is Zulu (1964) but is it the best war movie ever made? No, it just happens to be my favorite. In what universe is Serenity the best scifi movie ever made? It's a good film, but it's also a spinoff which sometimes has trouble standing on its own. It has a terrific villain but underutilizes the majority of its cast. It makes little attempt to use science fiction to explore our current reality or make some comment about humanity (aside from a little "bureaucracy/leaders are corrupt" boilerplate) and barely comes to a conclusion. But you find it better than...everything else in the genre? Madness.


I have to say I'm with James here. Serenity was a three-star entertainment but calling it the best sci-fi movie ever is both ridiculous and uneducated. How is the film deep? Is it really that much more exceptional then other films from its genre? Is it really the best science fiction film ever in a genre that sports The Empire Strikes Back, Tarkovsky's Solaris, Alien, Metropolis and, in my opinion, A.I. Artificial Intelligence? Serenity is a lot of fun and has an exceptionally written villain, but it took me a while to catch up as I hadn't seen the series. Also, the quality of writing on the film is sub par to that of the ill fated but rather excellent TV show. The one liners of the film annoyed me for the first part of my initial viewing: they felt fake, like written one liners as opposed to witty exchanges between real characters. The film turned out better then its shaky opening scenes, but still was hardly perfect. I understand that you love the movie and that its one of your favorites, but there is no argument that can support the statement of calling it the best science fiction movie ever made.


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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
JJoshay wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
firefly wrote:
Serenity (also a classic, the best sci fi movie ever)


Okay even I'm starting to get annoyed at my own negativity by now, but...

How on earth can you say that? My favorite movie is Zulu (1964) but is it the best war movie ever made? No, it just happens to be my favorite. In what universe is Serenity the best scifi movie ever made? It's a good film, but it's also a spinoff which sometimes has trouble standing on its own. It has a terrific villain but underutilizes the majority of its cast. It makes little attempt to use science fiction to explore our current reality or make some comment about humanity (aside from a little "bureaucracy/leaders are corrupt" boilerplate) and barely comes to a conclusion. But you find it better than...everything else in the genre? Madness.


I have to say I'm with James here. Serenity was a three-star entertainment but calling it the best sci-fi movie ever is both ridiculous and uneducated. How is the film deep? Is it really that much more exceptional then other films from its genre? Is it really the best science fiction film ever in a genre that sports The Empire Strikes Back, Tarkovsky's Solaris, Alien, Metropolis and, in my opinion, A.I. Artificial Intelligence? Serenity is a lot of fun and has an exceptionally written villain, but it took me a while to catch up as I hadn't seen the series. Also, the quality of writing on the film is sub par to that of the ill fated but rather excellent TV show. The one liners of the film annoyed me for the first part of my initial viewing: they felt fake, like written one liners as opposed to witty exchanges between real characters. The film turned out better then its shaky opening scenes, but still was hardly perfect. I understand that you love the movie and that its one of your favorites, but there is no argument that can support the statement of calling it the best science fiction movie ever made.

Having seen all of those except Solaris (I've seen the remake, and the original is on my Netflix list), I can say confidently that I hold Serenity above all of them.

I'll start out by referencing Orson Scott Card's review of Serenity: http://www.hatrack.com/osc/reviews/ever ... xtra.shtml

Here's one of the key parts:
Quote:
Because for me, a great film -- sci-fi or otherwise -- comes down to relationships and moral decisions. How people are with each other, how they build communities, what they sacrifice for the sake of others, what they mean when they think of a decision as right vs. wrong.


Some people think that science fiction should be about technology and not about relationships. That's where the 2001 love comes from, imo. Serenity is different. It's a character-driven film. Most sci fi films simply fail to capture compelling characters.

I think that you (and James) failed to catch the deeper level of Serenity. It's a movie about belief, self-determinism, and liberty. In fact, it is in some ways reminiscent of Casablanca: Mal has to answer the same question that Frank had to answer: will you remain on the sidelines. Mal has to find something to believe in. The movie is about belief. The Operative has his set of beliefs, and they are genuine. He believes that the state can make people better. This isn't a comic book battle of good and evil: it's rather a clear illustration of the dangers of social engineering and an overambitious state. It's essentially Tocqueville and Hayek wrapped up in a 2 hour movie.

That's still a bit vague (I'm working on some material that I hope to eventually make into a book that I can one day assign undergrad students to read on the political theory and analysis of Firefly and Serenity). I would, however, encourage you to rewatch it. The first time I watched it, I enjoyed it on more of the level that you did (though I was considerably more positive). It was on the second, third, etc. viewings that the deeper meaning and profoundness of the movie really sunk in. It's profound without being sodden.

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Sun Apr 17, 2011 5:04 pm
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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
firefly wrote:
Having seen all of those except Solaris (I've seen the remake, and the original is on my Netflix list), I can say confidently that I hold Serenity above all of them.

I'll start out by referencing Orson Scott Card's review of Serenity: http://www.hatrack.com/osc/reviews/ever ... xtra.shtml

Here's one of the key parts:
Quote:
Because for me, a great film -- sci-fi or otherwise -- comes down to relationships and moral decisions. How people are with each other, how they build communities, what they sacrifice for the sake of others, what they mean when they think of a decision as right vs. wrong.


Some people think that science fiction should be about technology and not about relationships. That's where the 2001 love comes from, imo. Serenity is different. It's a character-driven film. Most sci fi films simply fail to capture compelling characters.

I think that you (and James) failed to catch the deeper level of Serenity. It's a movie about belief, self-determinism, and liberty. In fact, it is in some ways reminiscent of Casablanca: Mal has to answer the same question that Frank had to answer: will you remain on the sidelines. Mal has to find something to believe in. The movie is about belief. The Operative has his set of beliefs, and they are genuine. He believes that the state can make people better. This isn't a comic book battle of good and evil: it's rather a clear illustration of the dangers of social engineering and an overambitious state. It's essentially Tocqueville and Hayek wrapped up in a 2 hour movie.

That's still a bit vague (I'm working on some material that I hope to eventually make into a book that I can one day assign undergrad students to read on the political theory and analysis of Firefly and Serenity). I would, however, encourage you to rewatch it. The first time I watched it, I enjoyed it on more of the level that you did (though I was considerably more positive). It was on the second, third, etc. viewings that the deeper meaning and profoundness of the movie really sunk in. It's profound without being sodden.


The best way I can reply to this is by quoting Jim Emerson from a comment he left in response to a readers defense of Inception, "The way I see it, those themes you mention are present, but aren't sufficiently explored or supported by this particular movie. To me, they seem like afterthoughts..."


Sun Apr 17, 2011 5:27 pm
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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
firefly wrote:
I'll start out by referencing Orson Scott Card's review of Serenity: http://www.hatrack.com/osc/reviews/ever ... xtra.shtml


Yeah you're losing me already. Orson Scott Card thinks Voyage of the Dawn Treader is a great film and Tangled was one of the best movies of 2010. Ender's Game is a fun book but the guy's a terrible movie critic.

firefly wrote:
Most sci fi films simply fail to capture compelling characters.


Indeed, and Serenity is one of them. The only developed characters are Mal and The Operative.

firefly wrote:
It's a movie about belief, self-determinism, and liberty. In fact, it is in some ways reminiscent of Casablanca: Mal has to answer the same question that Frank had to answer: will you remain on the sidelines. Mal has to find something to believe in. The movie is about belief. The Operative has his set of beliefs, and they are genuine. He believes that the state can make people better. This isn't a comic book battle of good and evil: it's rather a clear illustration of the dangers of social engineering and an overambitious state


That entire paragraph could have been rewritten about Star Wars with minimal changes. What you talk about isn't really there in the movie. The Operative is great, but the Alliance is completely underdeveloped--they're just a faceless "them" in a long tradition of movies about a band of rebels, much like the Empire in Star Wars. Which, incidentally, is no more deep than Serenity, but considerably better crafted. And you know what? It's still not the best SciFi movie ever made.

Serenity's a fun movie, but I can't believe you're trying to see so much in it.

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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
JamesKunz wrote:
firefly wrote:
I'll start out by referencing Orson Scott Card's review of Serenity: http://www.hatrack.com/osc/reviews/ever ... xtra.shtml


Yeah you're losing me already. Orson Scott Card thinks Voyage of the Dawn Treader is a great film and Tangled was one of the best movies of 2010. Ender's Game is a fun book but the guy's a terrible movie critic.


He's less of a movie critic than he is a writer and a literary critic, but he knows more about storytelling than virtually anyone else alive.

Quote:
firefly wrote:
Most sci fi films simply fail to capture compelling characters.


Indeed, and Serenity is one of them. The only developed characters are Mal and The Operative.


I don't agree. I think that you get a good sense of all of the primary characters (Book has more of a cameo, so he doesn't quite count). Zoe, Jayne, Kaylee, and particularly River are very fleshed out, three dimensional characters. Compare them to the dreadful bores in 2001. They have very clever dialogue, sure, but it seems like people are using this as a fault. Whedon is capable of crafting extremely clever dialogue, as Shakespeare was able to--both load their characters with abundantly witty lines. This doesn't take away from their distinctiveness. Take, for example,

[Reveal] Spoiler:
the way that Zoe responds to Wash's death. She initially acts as though she's unaffected, but we see that she intends on sacrificing herself to try to stop the Reavers. The others have to snap her out of that. Her last line is incredible--it shows both the hurt of losing her husband and the strength and determination of striving to persevere.


firefly wrote:
It's a movie about belief, self-determinism, and liberty. In fact, it is in some ways reminiscent of Casablanca: Mal has to answer the same question that Frank had to answer: will you remain on the sidelines. Mal has to find something to believe in. The movie is about belief. The Operative has his set of beliefs, and they are genuine. He believes that the state can make people better. This isn't a comic book battle of good and evil: it's rather a clear illustration of the dangers of social engineering and an overambitious state


Quote:
That entire paragraph could have been rewritten about Star Wars with minimal changes. What you talk about isn't really there in the movie. The Operative is great, but the Alliance is completely underdeveloped--they're just a faceless "them" in a long tradition of movies about a band of rebels, much like the Empire in Star Wars. Which, incidentally, is no more deep than Serenity, but considerably better crafted. And you know what? It's still not the best SciFi movie ever made.


The Operative is essentially the face of the Alliance. It's true that we don't see the Alliance but that's not the point of the movie. The movie takes place in a 'verse ruled by the Alliance, but it isn't the story of the downfall of the Alliance. It's about showing the flaw in their thinking. The Operative represents their twisted optimism, their willingness to play god, and the human consequences that it has. We don't need them to be there.

And I'd certainly differentiate it from Star Wars, which had Darth Vader and "The dark side." Darth Vader was a great villain, one of the best that we've had on cinema, but he was also very transparently a villain. The Operative is not. If it were a Japanese movie, he'd be the hero ;) There is no darkside and there are no jedi knights or mystical power of "the force." There are no strange creatures like Chewbaca. There are people, doing things that people do, dealing with the issues that people deal with. It's a story about tomorrow, with elements of yesterday, that feels like today.

I think that the first two Star Wars movies are very good, definitely among the ten best science fiction films that have been made. But they're not as deep as Serenity, because at the end they reduce to a comic book good vs evil (also, they are blatantly pro-monarchy and elitist), instead of a deeper philosophical debate over the role of the state and the 'progress' of humanity.

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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
firefly wrote:

He's less of a movie critic than he is a writer and a literary critic, but he knows more about storytelling than virtually anyone else alive.


........wow. Have you read Ender's Shadow? Christ the man rewrites the same story from different angles and publishes it as a separate book.

firefly wrote:
Whedon is capable of crafting extremely clever dialogue, as Shakespeare was able to


You just compared Joss Whedon to Shakespeare. In a shamelessly unnecessary way.

firefly wrote:
instead of a deeper philosophical debate over the role of the state and the 'progress' of humanity.


And now we reach the crux of our debate. Where I'm unlikely to budge you. But I still can't believe you feel this way. It's a zany combination of western and scifi that spun-off from a failed television show which features comic-relief twins and one-liners like "My muscular buttocks it's forty." And you think it's the pinnacle of a genre. Madness.

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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
JamesKunz wrote:
........wow. Have you read Ender's Shadow? Christ the man rewrites the same story from different angles and publishes it as a separate book.


I've only read Ender's Game (loved it, and finished it in a very short period of time). I'm really not surprised though--most writers do rework the same stories time and time again.

Quote:
You just compared Joss Whedon to Shakespeare. In a shamelessly unnecessary way.


Haha I contemplated that, and thought about adding some sort of qualifier. I do think that Whedon is among the best modern writers.


Quote:
And now we reach the crux of our debate. Where I'm unlikely to budge you. But I still can't believe you feel this way. It's a zany combination of western and scifi that spun-off from a failed television show which features comic-relief twins and one-liners like "My muscular buttocks it's forty." And you think it's the pinnacle of a genre. Madness.


Absolutely. Check out some of the one-liners, puns, etc. in Othello. You're right that it's a zany combo of western and sci fi, but think about, for comparison, Gulliver's Travels. Whedon's power comes from his ability to combine genres, turn aspects of them on their head, and make a profound statement without ever getting into the heavyhanded, self-aware pomposity of certain other sci fi films.

You're right that you're unlikely to budge me (and regrettably, I'm unlikely to budge you). It is however fun to come at it from a different perspective: writing for a Firefly podcast, I've been basically preaching to the choir. Here I have to try to convince people to join the choir.

I would say this: Watch Never Let Me Go, then rewatch Serenity, and think about the two movies on a philosophical level. I think that'll help establish where the movie is at, and what a stark and powerful message it has. In particular, watch Mal's last major speech.

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Sun Apr 17, 2011 7:14 pm
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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
firefly wrote:
Quote:
And now we reach the crux of our debate. Where I'm unlikely to budge you. But I still can't believe you feel this way. It's a zany combination of western and scifi that spun-off from a failed television show which features comic-relief twins and one-liners like "My muscular buttocks it's forty." And you think it's the pinnacle of a genre. Madness.


Absolutely. Check out some of the one-liners, puns, etc. in Othello.


*Slaps forehead*


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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
firefly wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
........wow. Have you read Ender's Shadow? Christ the man rewrites the same story from different angles and publishes it as a separate book.


I've only read Ender's Game (loved it, and finished it in a very short period of time). I'm really not surprised though--most writers do rework the same stories time and time again.

Quote:
You just compared Joss Whedon to Shakespeare. In a shamelessly unnecessary way.


Haha I contemplated that, and thought about adding some sort of qualifier. I do think that Whedon is among the best modern writers.


Quote:
And now we reach the crux of our debate. Where I'm unlikely to budge you. But I still can't believe you feel this way. It's a zany combination of western and scifi that spun-off from a failed television show which features comic-relief twins and one-liners like "My muscular buttocks it's forty." And you think it's the pinnacle of a genre. Madness.


Absolutely. Check out some of the one-liners, puns, etc. in Othello. You're right that it's a zany combo of western and sci fi, but think about, for comparison, Gulliver's Travels. Whedon's power comes from his ability to combine genres, turn aspects of them on their head, and make a profound statement without ever getting into the heavyhanded, self-aware pomposity of certain other sci fi films.

You're right that you're unlikely to budge me (and regrettably, I'm unlikely to budge you). It is however fun to come at it from a different perspective: writing for a Firefly podcast, I've been basically preaching to the choir. Here I have to try to convince people to join the choir.

I would say this: Watch Never Let Me Go, then rewatch Serenity, and think about the two movies on a philosophical level. I think that'll help establish where the movie is at, and what a stark and powerful message it has. In particular, watch Mal's last major speech.


Look, I respect your civil nature, and I'll rewatch Serenity if you watch Gattaca

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Post Re: Define your film taste in 10 films or less....
JamesKunz wrote:

Look, I respect your civil nature, and I'll rewatch Serenity if you watch Gattaca


I own Gattaca; it's one of my favorite sci fi films :!:

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