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The Top 100 
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Post Re: The Top 100
1 Citizen Kane Welles, Orson 1941 US 119
3 Rules of the Game, The Renoir, Jean 1939 France 113
4 2001: A Space Odyssey Kubrick, Stanley 1968 UK 139
5 8½ Fellini, Federico 1963 Italy 135
6 Godfather, The Coppola, Francis 1972 US 175
8 Battleship Potemkin Eisenstein, Sergei 1925 Russia 65
9 Seven Samurai, The Kurosawa, Akira 1954 Japan 200
14 Bicycle Thieves De Sica, Vittorio 1948 Italy 90
15 Casablanca Curtiz, Michael 1942 US 102
18 Raging Bull Scorsese, Martin 1980 US 128
19 Rashomon Kurosawa, Akira 1950 Japan 88
23 City Lights Chaplin, Charles 1931 US 86
28 Taxi Driver Scorsese, Martin 1976 US 113
29 Sunset Blvd. Wilder, Billy 1950 US 110
39 Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned… Kubrick, Stanley 1964 UK 93
44 400 Blows, The Truffaut, François 1959 France 99
45 It's a Wonderful Life Capra, Frank 1946 US 129
48 Modern Times Chaplin, Charles 1936 US 89
50 Strada, La Fellini, Federico 1954 Italy 115
52 Seventh Seal, The Bergman, Ingmar 1957 Sweden 96
53 M Lang, Fritz 1931 Germany 99
55 Apartment, The Wilder, Billy 1960 US 125
94 Double Indemnity Wilder, Billy 1944 US 106
95 Battle of Algiers, The Pontecorvo, Gillo 1965 Algeria-Italy 123
97 Man with a Movie Camera, The Vertov, Dziga 1929 USSR 80
99 GoodFellas Scorsese, Martin 1990 US 146

It turns out I've seen 55 films, which I guess is more than I thought. I originally had it at 56, but I keep forgetting I haven't seen The Third Man. The ones listed above are my favorites. The ones I'm ashamed I haven't seen? I guess you can throw in The Third Man in there. I don't know why I haven't purchased it on Blu-ray yet. Add Apocalypse Now (there are two versions at three hours each; I'd like to see them both in the same day or something like that), North By Northwest (no excuses here, it's pretty pathetic), The Searchers (I'm not a huge fan of Westerns or John Ford, really), Breathless (watching it in the next week or so), and Aguirre: The Wrath of God (almost watched it on nine different occasions - nine!).


Tue Jul 28, 2009 12:29 pm
Post Re: The Top 100
1 Citizen Kane Welles, Orson 1941 US
2 Vertigo Hitchcock, Alfred 1958 US
3 Rules of the Game, The Renoir, Jean 1939 France
4 2001: A Space Odyssey Kubrick, Stanley 1968 UK
5 8½ Fellini, Federico 1963 Italy
6 Godfather, The Coppola, Francis 1972 US
7 Searchers, The Ford, John 1956 US
8 Battleship Potemkin Eisenstein, Sergei 1925 Russia
9 Seven Samurai, The Kurosawa, Akira 1954 Japan
10 Tokyo Story Ozu, Yasujiro 1953 Japan
11 Singin' in the Rain Donen, Stanley/Gene Kelly 1952 US
13 Lawrence of Arabia Lean, David 1962 UK
14 Bicycle Thieves De Sica, Vittorio 1948 Italy
15 Casablanca Curtiz, Michael 1942 US
17 Passion of Joan of Arc, The Dreyer, Carl 1928 France
18 Raging Bull Scorsese, Martin 1980 US
19 Rashomon Kurosawa, Akira 1950 Japan
20 Godfather Part II, The Coppola, Francis 1974 US
21 Touch of Evil Welles, Orson 1958 US
22 Some Like it Hot Wilder, Billy 1959 US
23 City Lights Chaplin, Charles 1931 US
24 Third Man, The Reed, Carol 1949 UK
26 Dolce vita, La Fellini, Federico 1960 Italy
27 Gold Rush, The Chaplin, Charles 1925 US
28 Taxi Driver Scorsese, Martin 1976 US
29 Sunset Blvd. Wilder, Billy 1950 US
31 Enfants du paradis, Les Carné, Marcel 1945 France
32 Psycho Hitchcock, Alfred 1960 US
33 Breathless Godard, Jean-Luc 1959 France
35 Apocalypse Now Coppola, Francis 1979 US
36 Chinatown Polanski, Roman 1974 US
37 Night of the Hunter, The Laughton, Charles 1955 US
39 Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned… Kubrick, Stanley 1964
42 Jules et Jim Truffaut, François 1961 France
44 400 Blows, The Truffaut, François 1959 France
45 It's a Wonderful Life Capra, Frank 1946 US
46 Blade Runner Scott, Ridley 1982 US
47 Rear Window Hitchcock, Alfred 1954 US
48 Modern Times Chaplin, Charles 1936 US
49 North by Northwest Hitchcock, Alfred 1959 US
50 Strada, La Fellini, Federico 1954 Italy
51 Intolerance Griffith, D.W. 1916 US
52 Seventh Seal, The Bergman, Ingmar 1957 Sweden
53 M Lang, Fritz 1931 Germany
54 Ugetsu monogatari Mizoguchi, Kenji 1953 Japan
55 Apartment, The Wilder, Billy 1960 US
58 Wild Bunch, The Peckinpah, Sam 1969 US
60 Gone with the Wind Fleming, Victor 1939 US
61 Au hasard Balthazar Bresson, Robert 1966 France
62 Wizard of Oz, The Fleming, Victor 1939 US
67 Nashville Altman, Robert 1975 US
70 Metropolis Lang, Fritz 1926 Germany
72 All About Eve Mankiewicz, Joseph L. 1950 US
73 Once Upon a Time in the West Leone, Sergio 1968 Italy-US
74 Fanny and Alexander Bergman, Ingmar 1982 Sweden
75 Notorious Hitchcock, Alfred 1946 US
76 Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The Ford, John 1962 US
79 Bringing Up Baby Hawks, Howard 1938 US
81 Ikiru Kurosawa, Akira 1952 Japan
82 Amarcord Fellini, Federico 1973 Italy
83 Stagecoach Ford, John 1939 US
87 Playtime Tati, Jacques 1967 France
91 Aguirre: The Wrath of God Herzog, Werner 1972 Germany
92 Barry Lyndon Kubrick, Stanley 1975 UK
93 Clockwork Orange, A Kubrick, Stanley 1971 UK
94 Double Indemnity Wilder, Billy 1944 US
96 Hiroshima mon amour Resnais, Alain 1959 France-Japan
99 GoodFellas Scorsese, Martin 1990 US


Make that 68 films seen altogether, 41 of the first 50, and then 27 of the next 50. 64 of the 68 I personally own in my collection (one exclusion, Metroplis, is due to lack of a definitive DVD release, and the biggest one, 'Wizard Of Oz', is probably never going to be bought as a priority purchase since I feel too familiar with it). I've seen parts of many films (including 'The General, which we watched to some length in my last film class), and some of them simply did not interest me. Some are probably films I will see one day and will lovingly kick myself for not having seen sooner. Personally, I feel lists like these are curiosities and I don't put as much effort or interest into seeing all of the films I haven't seen simply because they are on there. I'm looking out for work from basically any artist who piques my interest, for any number of reasons, and occasionally that will cross over with the the list. For now, I've been hungrily pursuing the 1999 film 'Rosetta', which I have high, high expectations for, and Fritz Lang's noir 'Scarlett Street', which I saw a part of in film class and simply have to see.


Tue Jul 28, 2009 6:21 pm
Post Re: The Top 100
Evenflow8112 wrote:
Personally, I feel lists like these are curiosities and I don't put as much effort or interest into seeing all of the films I haven't seen simply because they are on there. I'm looking out for work from basically any artist who piques my interest, for any number of reasons, and occasionally that will cross over with the the list.


Hi Evenflow 8112,

Absolutely, though the list is as comprehensive in its construction as anything I have encountered.

I think that the main reason to look at a list like this is for inspiration.

I have spent years watching awful "modern" movies and just spent the best three movie going months ever, exploring movies I'd either never heard of or never got round to seeing. My average score for movies in general is 5.02. The top 100 averaged over 8. That's pretty good.

I 100% agree that it's cool, to explore artists. The nice thing about this list was that I discovered some truly great new ones.

I had heard of Murnau but never seen one of his films. I would never have seen Greed, or the works of Mizoguchi. I'd never seen a film by Jean Renoir!

So I have a different view. Watch the top 100 at about one a month and have your eyes opened to a few movies that you'd either never heard of or may have missed. They won't all be perfect, but there will be some amazing treats along the road :-)

Rob


Tue Jul 28, 2009 8:17 pm
Post Re: The Top 100
Evenflow8112 wrote:
Make that 68 films seen altogether, 41 of the first 50, and then 27 of the next 50. 64 of the 68 I personally own in my collection (one exclusion, Metroplis, is due to lack of a definitive DVD release, and the biggest one, 'Wizard Of Oz', is probably never going to be bought as a priority purchase since I feel too familiar with it).


Regarding Metropolis, I would recommend the restored version by the F.W. Murnau Stiftung (Foundation) released in 2001 or 2002. I think it's called "restored authorized edition" in the U.S. This version is 147 minutes long and contains all available material with the exception of the 30 odd minutes recently discovered in Argentina. Missing segments are filled in with stills. This is the most definitive version we will probably get, bearing in mind that the original 210 minute version was only shown once before Meropolis was recut to about 150 minutes for theatrical release.

The most recent news regarding the material discovered in Argentina is that it is in a very bad condition and in parts beyond repair, but restoration has begun. It is unclear whether these 30 minutes will be integrated into a new edition or will be extras in a re-release.


Wed Jul 29, 2009 4:59 am
Post Re: The Top 100
Unke wrote:
Evenflow8112 wrote:
Make that 68 films seen altogether, 41 of the first 50, and then 27 of the next 50. 64 of the 68 I personally own in my collection (one exclusion, Metroplis, is due to lack of a definitive DVD release, and the biggest one, 'Wizard Of Oz', is probably never going to be bought as a priority purchase since I feel too familiar with it).


Regarding Metropolis, I would recommend the restored version by the F.W. Murnau Stiftung (Foundation) released in 2001 or 2002. I think it's called "restored authorized edition" in the U.S. This version is 147 minutes long and contains all available material with the exception of the 30 odd minutes recently discovered in Argentina. Missing segments are filled in with stills. This is the most definitive version we will probably get, bearing in mind that the original 210 minute version was only shown once before Meropolis was recut to about 150 minutes for theatrical release.

The most recent news regarding the material discovered in Argentina is that it is in a very bad condition and in parts beyond repair, but restoration has begun. It is unclear whether these 30 minutes will be integrated into a new edition or will be extras in a re-release.



Hi Unke

Do you know of a DVD that represents the restored version by the F.W. Murnau Stiftung (Foundation) released in 2001 or 2002?

Thanks
Rob


Wed Jul 29, 2009 10:15 am
Post Re: The Top 100
Robert Holloway wrote:
Hi Unke

Do you know of a DVD that represents the restored version by the F.W. Murnau Stiftung (Foundation) released in 2001 or 2002?

Thanks
Rob


Hi Rob,

I think it is the version: http://www.amazon.com/Metropolis-Restor ... 296&sr=1-1

I'm not sure because the running time is only 117 minutes. But on amazon Germany, the running time is also stated to be only 118 minutes. http://www.amazon.de/dp/B00008OE34/?tag ... yfxrdoyo_b

It's possible that the missing scenes, which have been replaced with title cards and stills, have not been counted, but maybe my information of the running time of the restored version being 147 minutes is wrong. Unfortunately, I don't have the packaging available at the moment.

By the way, I've just checked and a F.W. Murnau Foundation are going to release a newly restored version with the Argentinian footage (possibly as extras) in 2010.

Cheerio

Unke


Wed Jul 29, 2009 10:39 am
Director

Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 7:44 pm
Posts: 1439
Post Re: The Top 100
Rob, Ebert just posted this today, its a blog about this subject:

Quote:
All lists of the "greatest" movies are propaganda. They have no deeper significance. It is useless to debate them. Even more useless to quarrel with their ordering of titles: Why is this film #11 and that one only #31? The most interesting lists are those by one person: What are Scorsese's favorites, or Herzog's? The least interesting are those by large-scale voting, for example by IMDb or movie magazines. The most respected poll, the only one I participate in, is the vote taken every 10 years by Sight & Sound, the British film magazine, which asks a large number of filmmakers, writers, critics, scholars, archivists and film festival directors.

That one at least has taken on a canonical aspect. The list evolves slowly. Keaton rises, Chaplin falls. It is eventually decided that "Vertigo" is Hitchcock's finest film. Ozu cracks the top ten. Every ten years the net is thrown out again. The Sight & Sound list at least reflects widespread thinking in what could be called the film establishment, and reflects awareness of the full span of more than a century of cinema.

The IMDb list of "250 Top Movies of All Time" is the best-known and most-quoted of all "best movie" lists. It looks to be weighted toward more recent films, although Keith Simonton, who is in charge over there, tells me they have a mathematical model that somewhat corrects for that. Specifically, it guards against this week's overnight sensation shooting to the top of the list on a wave of fanboy enthusiasm. Still, the IMDb voters are probably much younger on average than the Sight & Sound crowd. To the degree the list merely reflects their own tastes back at them, it tells them what they already know.

To be useful to me, a list should contain titles I'm not familiar with, suggest directors I should be looking at, and inspire me to give some films another look. That's what I mean by its function as "propaganda." When any of us makes a list, aren't we really telling other people what they should like? A title that has frequently appeared in my S&S voting has been Errol Morris's "Gates of Heaven." Is it really one of the ten greatest films ever made? I have no idea, because such a list is so limited and arbitrary anyway. That it is a great film I have no doubt. It fascinates me on every viewing, and I've seen it at least 20 times. When I put on my S&S list, it wasn't available on home video in any form, and I wanted to call attention to it.

You can look over the individual lists of the S&S voters and find a lot of titles that are flares sent up on behalf of a personal passion. Other voting might be strategic. I am convinced, for example, that Yasujiro Ozu should be on the list. His films have a remarkable uniformity of excellence. Which should I select? My personal favorite is the sound version of "Floating Weeds," but I voted for "Tokyo Story" because it is also fully deserving, and I sensed it would find wider support. I guessed correctly, and "Tokyo Story" is now on the list.

That brings us to a new list of fifty films, compiled in late June by the Spectator, a weekly London magazine that has been published continuously since 1711. Conservative for nearly 300 years, it is my favorite magazine because of its writing, which is superb, and because its conservative writers are intelligent and witty, and not bloody-minded and angry like so many of their American counterparts. But enough about politics. The Spectator's list has been compiled by two men: Its editor Matthew d'Anacona, and Peter Hoskin, its web editor. They aren't particularly famed for their opinions on film, but on the basis of their list they know their movies, and aren't trapped in the present.



Fri Jul 31, 2009 3:17 pm
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Director

Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 7:44 pm
Posts: 1439
Post Re: The Top 100
Quote:
Their selection passes my most important test: It is interesting. It contains ten titles that aren't included in my ever-growing Great Movies Collection, and I am now inspired to consider them. In fact, my recent inclusion of Howard Hawks' "Rio Bravo," which would have become a Great Movie anyway, was given a nudge when my Spectator arrived in the mail.


more at http://blogs.suntimes.com/ebert/2009/07 ... _made.html

Here is The Spectator's list:

1. The Night of the Hunter, Laughton
2. Apocalypse Now, Coppola
3. Sunrise, Murnau
4. Black Narcissus, Powell & Pressburger
5. L'avventura, Antonioni
6. The Searchers, Ford
7. The Magnificent Ambersons, Welles
8. The Seventh Seal , Bergman
9. L'atalante, Vigo
10. Rio Bravo, Hawks
11. The Godfather: Part I and Part II, Coppola
12. The Passion of Joan of Arc, Dreyer
13. La Grande Illusion, Renoir
14. Citizen Kane, Welles
15. The Scarlett Empress, von Sternberg
16. Tokyo Story, Ozu
17. Blade Runner, Ridley Scott
18. Rear Window, Hitchcock
19. Point Blank, Boorman
20. The Red Shoes, Powell & Pressburger
21. The Earrings of Madame de..., Ophuls
22. Shadows, Cassavetes
23. Pickpocket, Bresson
24. Viridiana, Bunuel
25. Barry Lyndon, Kubrick
26. City Lights, Chaplin
27. Pierrot le Fou, 1964
28. Sunset Boulevard, Wilder
29. Notorious, Hitchcock
30. M, Lang
31. The Roaring Twenties, Walsh
32. Singin' in the Rain, Donen and Kelly
33. The Long Day Closes, Davies
34. Killer of Sheep, Burnett
35. Gun Crazy, Lewis
36. Andrei Rublev, Tarkovsky
37. Taxi Driver, Scorsese
38. The 400 Blows, Truffaut
39. Pulp Fiction, Tarantino
40. Kind Hearts and Coronets, Hamer
41. In the Mood for Love, Wong Kar-Wei
42. Sullivan's Travels, Sturges
43. 8 1/2, Fellini
44. Pinocchio, Disney
45. Great Expectations, Lean
46. Rome, Open City, Rossellini
47. Duck Soup, McCarey
48. Jaws, Spielberg
49. Manhattan, Allen
50. Out of the Past, Tourneur


Fri Jul 31, 2009 3:20 pm
Profile
Post Re: The Top 100
I feel that "The Shawshank Redemption " needs to be included in this list somewhere.
It is the one of the finest film ever made.
It has a beautifully told story, perfect cast, impeccable acting from everyone.
It also manages to tell an inspirational story without being preachy.
It is the best perfoemance from Morgan Freeman. One of the finest actors working at the moment. This is especially apt when you consider that the charactor of Red was written origionally as a Red Headed Irishman. He made the role his own.


Fri Sep 11, 2009 5:22 am
Post Re: The Top 100
Further discussion of the status of this sub-forum and the goings on of the last couple of weeks can be found here.
That thread will be deleted soon since the matter is mostly closed at this point.

It's time to resume our own discussion of these great films. That means no badmouthing of members, past or present, even if they did things you found to be unjustified. We can still make this sub-forum great. The organization is still all in place and I think we can all go on this journey together over the coming months and years, although at a more leisurely pace--not in the breakneck/all-or-nothing way that Rob seemed to prefer. Any further comments on this matter outside of the aforementioned thread will be deleted. Thank you.


Sat Sep 26, 2009 1:46 am
Post Re: The Top 100
Of the top 100 Shooting Pictures i have seen only 63...

Citizen Kane
Vertigo
Rules of the Game, The
2001: A Space Odyssey

Godfather, The
Searchers, The
Battleship Potemkin
Seven Samurai, The
Singin' in the Rain
Sunrise
Lawrence of Arabia
Bicycle Thieves
Casablanca
Atalante, L'
Raging Bull
Rashomon
Godfather Part II, The
Touch of Evil
Some Like it Hot
City Lights
Third Man, The
Grande illusion, La
Gold Rush, The
Taxi Driver
Sunset Blvd.
General, The
Psycho
Breathless
Apocalypse Now
Chinatown
Night of the Hunter, The
Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
Persona
Magnificent Ambersons, The
It's a Wonderful Life
Blade Runner
Rear Window
Modern Times
North by Northwest
Strada, La
Intolerance
Seventh Seal, The
M
Ugetsu monogatari
Apartment, The
Wild Strawberries
Wild Bunch, The
Pather Panchali
Gone with the Wind
Wizard of Oz, The
Metropolis
To Be or Not to Be
All About Eve
Notorious
Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The
Bringing Up Baby
Ikiru
Stagecoach
Aguirre: The Wrath of God
Clockwork Orange, A
Double Indemnity
GoodFellas


From the 63 Shooting Pictures i have not included the following on my list...


Atalante, L'
Grande illusion, La
Breathless
Night of the Hunter, The
Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
Persona
Blade Runner
North by Northwest
Seventh Seal, The
M
Apartment, The
To Be or Not to Be
Bringing Up Baby
Aguirre: The Wrath of God


Fri Nov 20, 2009 6:22 pm
Post Re: The Top 100
Judah wrote:
From the 63 Shooting Pictures i have not included the following on my list...


Atalante, L'
Grande illusion, La
Breathless
Night of the Hunter, The
Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
Persona
Blade Runner
North by Northwest
Seventh Seal, The
M
Apartment, The
To Be or Not to Be
Bringing Up Baby
Aguirre: The Wrath of God


Impressive. So you mean that the pictures quoted above didn't make your personal list? If so, it means that 48 out of 63 did find their way onto your list. Not too shabby at all. I love the Shoot Pictures list and I don't have nearly that good a ratio.


Fri Nov 20, 2009 10:46 pm
Director

Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 7:44 pm
Posts: 1439
Post Re: The Top 100
TSPDT has updated their list

http://www.theyshootpictures.com/gf1000 ... 0films.htm

Man With A Movie Camera, L'Age d'or, Hiroshima mon Amour, & Sherlock Jr dropped out of the top 100.

These films joined the top 100:
89 Jaws
94 On the Waterfront
99 Blue Velvet
100 Duck Soup

other notable changes:
Godfather II moves from 20 to 15
Psycho moves from 32 to 28
Third Man drops from 24 to 30
Dr Strangelove moves from 39 to 33
Blade Runner moves from 46 to 40
Ugetsu moves from 54 to 47
Jules et Jim drops from 42 to 49
Once Upon A Time in the West moves from 73 to 62


Wed Jan 13, 2010 3:08 pm
Profile
Post Re: The Top 100
calvero wrote:
89 Jaws
99 Blue Velvet
100 Duck Soup


Well I already don't like the new list. I've already expressed my strong dislike of Blue Velvet before, but holy shit is that nowhere near one of the 100 greatest movies ever made, no matter what hundreds of critics say. And don't get me wrong, Jaws and Duck Soup are both entertaining pictures, but neither are, to my mind, great pieces of cinema (although one could certainly make a case that Jaws is, and obviously many people have. Duck Soup really isn't all that special though, although it is funny).

Anyway, I'll be sticking with last years list for checklist purposes, if only because I've done so much work on it and I don't want to redo it. Maybe one of these days when I'm really bored I'll take a crack at it, but for now I don't care enough.

Another interesting development: The Dark Knight is in at 890. Who would've thought?


Wed Jan 13, 2010 8:14 pm
Post Re: The Top 100
calvero wrote:
These films joined the top 100:
89 Jaws
94 On the Waterfront
99 Blue Velvet
100 Duck Soup


I can understand the inclusion of Jaws. It's incredibly well-crafted and hugely influential. I personally think it's great, and I like it much more than the other 3 new additions. I found On the Waterfront to be full of christ imagery/allusions, and really nothing more than an incredible performance from Brando. Granted, it's a great performance, but, overall, I was unimpressed with the film. Blue Velvet is something I agree with Zeppelin on - don't like it. It has great moments, but it's heavy handed and doesn't come together. Duck Soup I absolutely loathed. I didn't find it funny didn't get anything of substance out of it. Of course, I doubt what's funny these days will still be funny in 40 or 50 years, so I can understand my lack of finding humor in it.



calvero wrote:
other notable changes:
Once Upon A Time in the West moves from 73 to 62


Always good to see this film moving up.


Thu Jan 14, 2010 2:14 pm
Post Re: The Top 100
majoraphasia wrote:
It looks as if I've seen 41 of the films. Out of the 59 remaining I'd like to see around 41 and leave out, to name only three,

- It's a Wonderful Life (I couldn't be any less interested)


:cry: A part of me just died a little bit inside major.


Wed Aug 18, 2010 7:22 pm
Post Re: The Top 100
Since the last time I posted in this thread, I saw fourteen films from the top 100. That means I only have thirty-one to go! Hmm, I just came up with an idea....


Sat Aug 21, 2010 2:31 am
Director

Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 7:44 pm
Posts: 1439
Post Re: The Top 100
here's the new list

http://www.theyshootpictures.com/gf1000 ... 0films.htm

Star Wars & Annie Hall crack the top 100 for the 1st time.

Jaws moves from 89 to 75
Clockwork Orange moves from 90 to 77
Battle of Algiers moves from 91 to 79


Thu Jan 20, 2011 6:13 pm
Profile
Post Re: The Top 100
calvero wrote:
here's the new list

http://www.theyshootpictures.com/gf1000 ... 0films.htm

Star Wars & Annie Hall crack the top 100 for the 1st time.

Jaws moves from 89 to 75
Clockwork Orange moves from 90 to 77
Battle of Algiers moves from 91 to 79


Damn calvie, you're quick. I checked yesterday but it wasn't online yet. This is cool though. As soon as I find the time I'll go through to see what's new and what's gone. Strange about Jaws though. It moved up considerably last year and again this year. The list overrates it, I think. Thoughts?


Fri Jan 21, 2011 1:15 am
Post Re: The Top 100
Apocalypse Now had a major move as well

I'm still waiting for Vertigo to go up one place :-)

Rob


Fri Jan 21, 2011 1:24 am
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