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Top 10 Favorite Directors? 
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Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
neco82 wrote:
Like another post said, these lists are bound to repeat themselves, but still, here's my list of directors whose films I'd watch no matter what they're about:

- Tim Burton (Has a style all of his own; you just know when you're watching a Burton film)
- Ridley Scott (Could this man have a more diverse resume?)
- Tony Scott
- Quentin Tarantino
- David Fincher
- Clint Eastwood (Great storyteller)
- Martin Scorsese
- Guy Ritchie (Ok, so he's done some shit films, but the man has style; I still maintain his marriage to Madonna is what ruined his career, at least RocknRolla was a step in the right direction)
- John Carpenter (Knows how to create atmosphere. Even at his worst - Ghosts of Mars - his films have a certain something that makes them watchable)

All the other ones I can respect even if not agree with, but Tony Scott?
How can you even tell his films apart from any other action/thriller director? He had some hits early in his career, but he's no auteur.


Mon Feb 16, 2009 4:09 pm
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
Trevor wrote:
neco82 wrote:
Like another post said, these lists are bound to repeat themselves, but still, here's my list of directors whose films I'd watch no matter what they're about:

- Tim Burton (Has a style all of his own; you just know when you're watching a Burton film)
- Ridley Scott (Could this man have a more diverse resume?)
- Tony Scott
- Quentin Tarantino
- David Fincher
- Clint Eastwood (Great storyteller)
- Martin Scorsese
- Guy Ritchie (Ok, so he's done some shit films, but the man has style; I still maintain his marriage to Madonna is what ruined his career, at least RocknRolla was a step in the right direction)
- John Carpenter (Knows how to create atmosphere. Even at his worst - Ghosts of Mars - his films have a certain something that makes them watchable)

All the other ones I can respect even if not agree with, but Tony Scott?
How can you even tell his films apart from any other action/thriller director? He had some hits early in his career, but he's no auteur.


When good Tony Scott is directing then we have such awesome movies like Last Boy Scout, Man on Fire, Deja Vu and Crimson Tide. But his movies he made with Tom Cruise do suck and The Fan was horrid.


Mon Feb 16, 2009 4:13 pm
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
They aren't necessarily the best directors, but my favorite. The ones whose films with me the most. The most entertaining and the most moving.

1. Alfred Hitchcock - "Vertigo" resonates the most with me, but this man has some eleven or twelve all-time classics in his filmography.
2. Stanley Kubrick - "Dr. Strangelove" is the funniest film of all time, in my book. And then there's "2001" and "Paths of Glory" and "Barry Lyndon" and...
3. Werner Herzog - "Aguirre, the Wrath of God" and "Stroszek" are enough to ensure his place among the great directors. Of course, he's also done quite a few other really, really fantastic films.
4. Ingmar Bergman - His films are alternately harrowing and beautiful. "The Virgin Spring" is probably my favorite of his films.
5. Hayao Miyazaki - I once heard it said that films like "Spirited Away" and "Kiki's Delivery Service" are perfect films to watch on a cold, rainy day (preferably with a nice cup of hot cocoa), and I completely agree. His films are so full of such immense wonder and imagination - no matter how bad I'm feeling, they never fail to make me feel at least a little more cheerful.
6. Francois Truffaut - He's not as popular as some of the other New Wave directors, but I, for one, find him to be the best of that bunch. Or at least my favorite. And it's not just his earlier films ("The 400 Blows" is among my top 10 favorite films,) but also his later ones, like "Small Change" and "The Wild Child". In fact, there's not a single one of his films that I don't like to some extent.
7. TIE: The Dardenne brothers; Mike Leigh - After Miyazaki, these are my favorite living directors. Many find their films to be boring, but in my mind they are responsible for some of the most intelligent, deeply humanistic and moral dramas being made today. Films like "Naked" and "Vera Drake", "Le Fils" and "L'enfant" are immensely moving, connecting with me more deeply than almost any other films.
9. TIE: Preston Sturges; Billy Wilder - Both are also really excellent writers, responsible for a huge amount of truly classic films. "The Miracle of Morgan's Creek" and "Stalag 17" and "The Lady Eve" and "Sunset Boulevard" and so on and so forth.

Honorable Mentions: Paul Thomas Anderson (one of the most promising young directors), Federico Fellini (my favorite is "I Vitelloni", but I do also really like "Nights of Cabiria" and "8 1/2" and several other of his films.)


Last edited by Timothy on Mon Feb 16, 2009 6:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Mon Feb 16, 2009 4:54 pm
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
Trevor wrote:
All the other ones I can respect even if not agree with, but Tony Scott?
How can you even tell his films apart from any other action/thriller director? He had some hits early in his career, but he's no auteur.


Maybe not an auteur, but some of his last films - Domino, Man on Fire, the Beat the Devil short film for BMW - have all shared that same quick-cut, rapid directing (don't know how else to describe it). I can recognize that over-the-top ADD style as Scott's, and I really like it.

That, and he's made some pretty entertaining films - again, Man on Fire, Crimson Tide, Deja Vu, Spy Game, The Last Boy Scout, and the upcoming Pelham 123 remake doesn't look so bad.


Mon Feb 16, 2009 5:11 pm
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
Note: The title says favorite, not greatest... I believe there is a difference... :D Not in any order...

David Cronenberg
Darren Aronofsky
M. Night Shaymalan
Peter Jackson
Quentin Tarantino
Tim Burton
Spike Lee
Steven Spielberg
Peter Segal
Ron Howard


Mon Feb 16, 2009 5:27 pm
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
Tony Scott wouldn't be in my top 10, but the man has made some good films: Crimson Tide, Enemy Of The State and Man On Fire are all movies I enjoyed.


Mon Feb 16, 2009 5:34 pm
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
Favorite directors (I didn’t say best directors, mind you), in alphabetical order:

1) John Carpenter – the classic that is Halloween, as well as The Fog (an unappreciated, atmospheric thriller), Big Trouble in Little China (Kurt Russell is awesome), Prince of Darkness (also unappreciated, starring Alice Cooper and that guy from Simon&Simon), In the Mouth of Madness (one of his best, and creepy as all hell), Christine, Assault on Precinct 13 (still my most shocking movie moment ever; if you’ve seen it, you know what I’m talking about), and Escape From New York. All classics in my book.

2) Coen Brothers – Raising Arizona (an all-time favorite), The Big Lebowski, O Brother Where Art Thou?, No Country For Old Men (ridiculously good; one of the best movies I’ve seen in the last five years), and of course Fargo.

3) Terry Gilliam – Brazil, Time Bandits, Twelve Monkeys, Monty Python and the Holy Grail (!), Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (long live Hunter Thompson!).

4) Howard Hawks – Hatari, The Thing From Another World, Red River, The Big Sleep, Bringing Up Baby. Man, would you look at that range?

5) Alfred Hitchcock – Psycho, Rear Window, Birds, The Man Who Knew Too Much, To Catch a Thief, Dial M for Murder, Rope. Again, where else can you find such a diverse range, and such consistent output? This list doesn’t even scratch the surface.

6) John Landis – American Werewolf in London, Animal House, Blues Brothers, Trading Places, Three Amigos, Coming to America. Kind of a dark horse, I know, but I love all of these movies.

7) Alex Proyas – The Crow, Dark City, and I, Robot. Not a stunning catalog, but I love them all.

8) Sam Raimi – Evil Dead, Army of Darkness, Quick and the Dead, Darkman, A Simple Plan (this one came as a complete surprise to me). Another oddball, maybe, but I love all of these. He’s got such style, and I can watch them all over and over. As Ash says: “Hail to the King, baby.”

9) Rob Reiner – This is Spinal Tap, The Sure Thing, Stand by Me, A Few Good Men, Princess Bride, Misery.

10) Spielberg – Jaws, Raiders, Jurassic Park, E.T., Saving Private Ryan, Minority Report. He’s kind of lost me over the years, but his early run was so spectacular, I can’t leave him off the list.

And, of course, a few honorable mentions (with more than one favorite, but not a comprehensive enough list to qualify in the top ten):

Luc Besson – The Professional, The Fifth Element, La Femme Nikita, The Big Blue
Stephen Chow – Shaolin Soccer (always puts a smile on my face), Kung Fu Hustle
Coppola – The Godfather, Apocalypse Now, The Conversation. He unfortunately loses points for Dracula.
Don Coscarelli – Phantasm and Bubba Ho-Tep. Two of my all time favorite horror movies: Phantasm for its wackiness, and Bubba Ho-Tep for its…even bigger wackiness. Who knew Bruce Campbell could act? I mean, really ACT.
Cameron Crowe – Say Anything, Singles, Almost Famous. Wow.
Ridley Scott – Alien and Blade Runner. Two of the best sci-fi movies ever.

This is, of course, all IMHO. Your mileage may vary.

Peace.


Mon Feb 16, 2009 9:16 pm
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
I'm not sure if my list will make sense. I have Directors I like but I don't like every single film that any Director has made. I'm not sure if that made any sense but I'll try to explain in my choices. this is in no order by the way. and I'm sure I'm forgetting some Directors.

Paul Thomas Anderson-my favorite by him is Magnolia. following closely behind is Punch-Drunk Love. I thought There Will Be Blood was a tad overrated but still good and I enjoyed Hard Eight/Sydney and Boogie Nights but not nearly as much as Magnolia and Punch-Drunk Love......hence not liking every movie by him.

Christopher Nolan-favorite is Memento.I also loved Following his first film which is very underrated in my opinion. The only movie I wasn't incredibly into was the remake of Insomnia. It was good but his other movies are better in my opinion.

Alejandro González Iñárritu- he has only made 3 films so far and I have loved all 3(a case in which I've liked all the movies a Director has done).
My favorite by him is 21 Grams followed by Babel and then Amores Perros.

Akira Kurosawa- I haven't seen a ton of films by him but from what I saw I loved Red Beard,Ikiru,Rashomon and I did like The Seven Samurai but thought it was a little overrated(although I have only seen it once mind you and plan to rewatch it soon).

The Dardenne Brothers-I love the realistic style they bring to their films. My favorite by them is La Promesse. I didn't like Rosetta that much(only seen it once) but I have liked their other works(The Son,The Child). I haven't seen Lorna's Silence yet but hope to soon.

Bahman Ghobadi-my favorite by him is Turtles Can Fly. I have only seen 2 films by this director but they were both amazing films in my opinion-Turtles Can Fly and A Time for Drunken Horses. He has only made 4 films and I plan to check out the other 2 soon.

Danny Boyle-my favorite by him is probably Trainspotting followed closely by Slumdog Millionaire,Shallow Grave and Millions. I haven't seen The Beach or A Life Less Ordinary but the movies I have seen by him I have loved-Shallow Grave,Trainspotting,28 Days later,Millions,Sunshine(although the ending kind of lost it),Slumdog Millionaire.

Woody Allen-although his films can be hit or miss for me sometimes the ones that "hit" for me I really love. some of my favorites by him are Annie Hall,Manhattan,Hannah and Her Sisters,Husbands and Wives and Stardust Memories.

Darren Aronofsky- the only movie I haven't liked as much by him is The Fountain(although I've only seen it once). My favorite is a tie between Requiem for a Dream and Pi. I did like The Wrestler but I need to give it another watch. Marissa Tomei's character didn't domuch for me although Rouke was great in it.

Stanley Kubrick-I haven't seen all of his films. I haven't liked all of the ones I've seen by him but the ones that were good were INCREDIBLE. My favorite by him is either 2001: A Space Odyssey or A Clockwork Orange. I also really liked Paths of Glory and The Shining. some that I thought were just decent(in my opinion) are Eyes Wide Shut and The Killing.


Honorable mention:
Coen brothers-I do not like every movie they've made. I wasn't really into Raising Arizona,Blood Simple and a few others but the good outweighs the "just decent" in my opinion. My favorite by them is probably Fargo and I also really enjoyed The Big Lebowski,No Country for Old Men,Barton Fink and The Man Who Wasn't There.

Peter Jackson-not sure if this one counts because I have only seen the LotR triliogy from but him but I think those movies are incredible. It goes beyond a fantasy for me. I plan to see King Kong and some of his earlier work soon


Mon Feb 16, 2009 10:42 pm
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
Floatingworld -

Frighteners by Peter Jackson is really well done. Bad Taste is fun, but the title says it all.

While you're watching those, I'll try to see the LOTR movies for the first time. ;)

Peace


Mon Feb 16, 2009 11:45 pm
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
HomerJ wrote:
Floatingworld -

Frighteners by Peter Jackson is really well done. Bad Taste is fun, but the title says it all.

While you're watching those, I'll try to see the LOTR movies for the first time. ;)

Peace


thanks! I'll check them out. and you must watch LOTR haha


Mon Feb 16, 2009 11:51 pm
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
Incredibly difficult to choose...but here's a rough list:

1) Welles - Yes, I know; this probably seems pretty cliche to most of you. But can anyone name me a better _directed_ film than Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons (please forget about the terrible ending), and Touch of Evil? Nobody touches Welles at his best

2) Mizoguchi - His films, especially Sansho, are like poetry in motion. His use of water and camera movement are remarkable. He moves me on a consistent basis as few others can. Check out Street of Shame, too.

3) Melville - The king of tension. Army of Shadows is brilliant. His love of the American Noir and the idea of loyalty not only come through with his actors, but with shot selection, mise en scene, and editing as well.

4) Herzog - What an insane man. I actually prefer his documentaries to his fictional films, but Aguirre is one of the most terrifying films I've ever watched.

5) Malick - Now, I don't always think this man's scripts hold up. As much as I enjoy _looking_ at all of his films, sometimes they can move a little slow. But watch Days of Heaven and Badlands and see what Malick can do with his camera _and_ a great narrative.

6) Eastwood - Here's a man who knows how to tell a story. He doesn't let his camera get in the way of telling a story (I'm looking at you, Danny Boyle). Unforgiven is his finest film, but he hasn't made anything less than an excellent movie since Blood Work (Mystic, MDB, and Iwo Jima being particularly notable). There's no director I more consistently look forward to nowadays (Malick and Herzog don't make movies too often, you know)

7) Kieslowski - Maybe the ultimate humanist. His camera can look at any situation and understand. And some of those camera movements in Red were downright magnificent. I go to Kieslowski when I need to remember I'm part of something bigger.

8) PT Anderson - In some ways, not only is Anderson from the Altman school, but he also has picked up the gauntlet laid down by Kieslowski in some of his films (see Magnolia and Boogie Nights). Then again, There Will Be Blood is so bold and new that I'd say that he might be creating his own school anyway.

9) Kurosawa - He's known for his samurai movies, but he's probably the most diverse director on this list. He could work within any genre and bring a technical brilliance to it. Just as the modern action movie wouldn't be anywhere without Seven Samurai, where would the modern crime drama be without Stray Dogs and High and Low?

10) Bergman - I must disagree with James' assertion that sometimes, Bergman is boring. I've never been anyth, ing but enraptured by his work. The emotional devastation I experience after watching Cries and Whispers, Virgin Spring, Scenes from a Marriage, etc. are unparalled by any director. He showed he still has it with the brilliant Saraband before he died.

Directors I can't believe aren't on this list: Bresson, the Coens, Tarantino, Desplechin, Chaplin, Egoyan (for The Sweet Hereafter and Exotica alone), Scorcese, Hitchcock, Miyazaki, and Lynch


Tue Feb 17, 2009 6:11 pm
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
1. Federico Fellini
2. Martin Scorsese
3. Steven Spielberg
4. Christopher Nolan
5. Sergio Leone
6. Quentin Tarantino
7. John Ford
8. Roman Polanski
9. Ben Affleck
10. George Clooney


Thu Mar 18, 2010 11:34 am
Assistant Second Unit Director

Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 10:41 am
Posts: 79
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
1. Antonioni, ending with The Passenger (1975). Mesmerizing pictures, can frame most of them. Philosophically not very deep, but compelling.
2. Kusturica - ending with Black Cat, White Cat. He can make very complex and elaborate group scenes like no one. Also very emotional and often funny.
3. Almodóvar - as Kusturica, warm-blooded cinema, very consistent, dramatic, funny.
4. Wenders - 70s, 80s, he used to be very good, stylish, cerebral.
5. Herzog - 70s, 80s, but will watch some newer films, mostly docs.
6. Kieslowski - sad loss, my favourites are The Blind Chance and White.
7. Bertrand Blier - 70s, 80s, he might be not truly great, but he is one of the guys pushing boundaries of acceptability and also hilarious when he is on.
8. Buñuel
9. Julio Medem - not truly great, but enormously appealing
10. Leone - especially Once Upon A Time In America

Should mention Altman, Scorsese, Cronenberg, Lynch, Truffaut, Coppola, Forman, Oliver Stone, Patrice Leconte, Verhoeven, Neil Jordan, Wajda, Trier, Amenabar, Zemeckis

Some thoughts.
1. I can appreciate older masters, like Hitchcock, but I do not feel any emotional attachment to their movies.
2. I also find quite infuriating recent Hollywood habit of taking top-notch art house directors and turning them into pretty good, but homogeneous mass directing films about flying idiots and slick criminals, so I cannot fully appreciate Nolan, Soderbergh etc.
3. There is a large group of very good directors, who are also very productive, so, let's say 1/3 of their output is crap and that distracts from their appreciation. It is easier for me to accept that someone, like Antonioni or Wenders was completely fabulous, but then lost his touch, than explaining how can someone make a bad film after a good film and then a good again etc. Consistency is somehow important to me.


Fri Mar 19, 2010 10:51 am
Profile
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
Freedom_Fryer wrote:
6. Kieslowski - sad loss, my favourites are The Blind Chance and White.

One of my favorites as well so I had to comment. Blind Chance is pretty good, but White? Really? Out of the Three Colors Trilogy that is the one you choose? Not really criticizing, just surprised. I found unfocused and dull compared to the other two.


Fri Mar 19, 2010 6:31 pm
Assistant Second Unit Director

Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 10:41 am
Posts: 79
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
Trevor wrote:
Freedom_Fryer wrote:
6. Kieslowski - sad loss, my favourites are The Blind Chance and White.

One of my favorites as well so I had to comment. Blind Chance is pretty good, but White? Really? Out of the Three Colors Trilogy that is the one you choose? Not really criticizing, just surprised. I found unfocused and dull compared to the other two.


I see "White" as a weird mix of a revenge movie and a comedy.
1. Comedy there is quite fabulous, Zamachowski, Stuhr and Gajos are top actors in Poland and are excellent by any world standards. Kieslowski used Zamachowski and Stuhr in Dekalog 10 in comedic roles quite nicely, Gajos was used in the "incest" drama Dekalog 4. A plus.
2. Revenge theme is strange, reminds me of the new Austrian movie Revanche, in that you don't expect what these people will do and that is nice. That's a plus, with a "weird" note.
3. Delpy is gorgeous, I cannot quite buy these two as a couple, so that's a minus.
Overall, there are some mixed feelings, but I like it a lot. It feels a bit like Almodovar, toned down to the Polish reality.


Sat Mar 20, 2010 12:48 am
Profile
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
Freedom_Fryer wrote:
10. Leone - especially Once Upon A Time In America


Waiting for the complete, 4+ hour extended cut of that film...


Sat Mar 20, 2010 6:23 am
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
The Shining Wizard wrote:
Freedom_Fryer wrote:
10. Leone - especially Once Upon A Time In America


Waiting for the complete, 4+ hour extended cut of that film...

...to come in the mail?

That is the version that has been on DVD for a few years now, as opposed to the original reordered 139 minute release.


Sat Mar 20, 2010 2:21 pm
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
Trevor wrote:
The Shining Wizard wrote:
Freedom_Fryer wrote:
10. Leone - especially Once Upon A Time In America


Waiting for the complete, 4+ hour extended cut of that film...

...to come in the mail?

That is the version that has been on DVD for a few years now, as opposed to the original reordered 139 minute release.


It may not be out in India yet Trev


Sat Mar 20, 2010 2:34 pm
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
I only know of a 229 minute version and that's the only version I've seen, but a friend told me that apparently a longer version of the film was in the works and that the studios (or whoever) had been saying they'd release such a version for a while now but never actually released it. So that's what I was referring to. Supposed to be 4 and a half hours long.

I couldn't really find any sources to backup the claims of my friend but I'm hoping it's true.

So has there really been a longer version out?


Thu Mar 25, 2010 6:23 am
Post Re: Top 10 Favorite Directors?
The Shining Wizard wrote:
I only know of a 229 minute version and that's the only version I've seen, but a friend told me that apparently a longer version of the film was in the works and that the studios (or whoever) had been saying they'd release such a version for a while now but never actually released it. So that's what I was referring to. Supposed to be 4 and a half hours long.

I couldn't really find any sources to backup the claims of my friend but I'm hoping it's true.

So has there really been a longer version out?


Oh, no then. I don't think anyone has anything but the 229 minute version now. The 4 and a half hour one is pretty much wishful thinking until somebody knows something and can back it up.


Thu Mar 25, 2010 10:18 am
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