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SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927) 
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Post SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
Click here for the review of Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (1927)

Co-Best Picture winner at the 1929 Oscars.


Mon Nov 09, 2009 8:22 pm
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Post Re: SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
There are some good posts on Sunrise in this thread:

viewtopic.php?f=48&t=1283

Another good review, hopefully bringing some general attention back to silent movies.


Tue Nov 10, 2009 2:28 am
Post Re: SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
Good review, although I found Sunrise somewhat lagging in the middle part. Just wanted to add that there is a region 2 (Europe) DVD which has been released in 2005.


Tue Nov 10, 2009 4:11 am
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Post Re: SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
I've been looking foward to this review more than any review you've done since Inglourious Basterds, thanks


Last edited by calvero on Tue Nov 10, 2009 6:42 pm, edited 2 times in total.



Tue Nov 10, 2009 6:31 pm
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Post Re: SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
Unke wrote:
Good review, although I found Sunrise somewhat lagging in the middle part. Just wanted to add that there is a region 2 (Europe) DVD which has been released in 2005.


I thought it lags a bit there, too, but right in the middle is that wonderful scene in the church which is one of the most powerful moments in the film. Sunrise has a lot moments that stay with you long after you see the movie. The wife cowering in the boat and the husband standing over her is another one.

I have four silents in my top 13, The Passion of Joan of Arc, Sunrise, Modern Times and City Lights. (Although the last three aren't absolutely silent.) Sunrise has gradually been moving up the list.

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Last edited by Syd Henderson on Tue Nov 10, 2009 6:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Tue Nov 10, 2009 6:41 pm
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Post Re: SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
Quote:
I have four silents in my top 13, The Passion of Joan of Arc, Sunrise, Modern Times and City Lights. Sunrise has gradually been moving up the list.


can you post your top 20?


Tue Nov 10, 2009 6:42 pm
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Post Re: SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
1 Dekalog 1989
2 Maltese Falcon, The 1941
3 Singin' in the Rain 1951
4 All About Eve 1950
5 Treasure of the Sierra Madre, The 1948
6 Passion of Joan of Arc, The 1928
7 Citizen Kane 1941
8 Sunrise 1927
9 Schindler's List 1993
10 High and Low 1963
11 Modern Times 1936
12 Fiddler on the Roof 1971
13 City Lights 1931
14 Samurai Rebellion 1967
15 Young Frankenstein 1974
16 Pinocchio 1940
17 Monty Python's Life of Brian 1979
18 Apartment, The 1960
19 Conversation, The 1974
20 Wizard of Oz, The 1939

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Tue Nov 10, 2009 6:49 pm
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Post Re: SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
^thanks for posting, nice list. Just rented High & Low, not sure how I've managed not to see that over the years.

anyone see Murnau's "Faust" or "The Haunted Castle?"

saw those 2 dvs available at the library, wondered if they are worth seeing


when will you have your 'All Quiet on the Western Front' review up, James?


Tue Nov 10, 2009 7:27 pm
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Post A Place In The Sun
This story was also made into the George Steven's film "A Place In The Sun". A very good film, featuring Montgomery Cliff and Elizabeth Taylor in their prime.

I'm not so sure silent films are as easy to "get into" as you say though, even for the best ones. I saw "Metropolis", and it was really hard for me to get through it. It had nothing to do with the fact that it's black and white or that it's really old (I liked Fritz Lang's "M".). I found the acting unsatisfactory. It seems like a lot of posturing, and extreme melodrama. The "jerky" motion of the actors also didn't help. I consider myself a film fan, but I still find silent films hard to sit through.


Tue Nov 10, 2009 8:01 pm
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Post Re: A Place In The Sun
forwonder wrote:
This story was also made into the George Steven's film "A Place In The Sun". A very good film, featuring Montgomery Cliff and Elizabeth Taylor in their prime.

I'm not so sure silent films are as easy to "get into" as you say though, even for the best ones. I saw "Metropolis", and it was really hard for me to get through it. It had nothing to do with the fact that it's black and white or that it's really old (I liked Fritz Lang's "M".). I found the acting unsatisfactory. It seems like a lot of posturing, and extreme melodrama. The "jerky" motion of the actors also didn't help. I consider myself a film fan, but I still find silent films hard to sit through.


How are you supposed to act when you don't have words? Everything had to be BIG!


Tue Nov 10, 2009 8:04 pm
Post Re: SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
calvero wrote:
^thanks for posting, nice list. Just rented High & Low, not sure how I've managed not to see that over the years.

anyone see Murnau's "Faust" or "The Haunted Castle?"

saw those 2 dvs available at the library, wondered if they are worth seeing


when will you have your 'All Quiet on the Western Front' review up, James?


I almost saw Faust for my Germany focus and didn't see it basically due to availability. I vote that you rent it because it's allegedly very good.


Wed Nov 11, 2009 12:07 am
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Post Re: SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
calvero wrote:
anyone see Murnau's "Faust" or "The Haunted Castle?"

saw those 2 dvs available at the library, wondered if they are worth seeing


when will you have your 'All Quiet on the Western Front' review up, James?


See "Faust." Well worth the expenditure of time.

"Cimarron" might end up going up before "All Quiet." I'm renting "Cimarron" from Netflix (in fact, it's supposed to arrive tomorrow). I need to watch it twice and write the review before sending it back. I own a copy of "All Quiet" so I have a little more flexibility with it.

Both should be up within the next three weeks.

Moving forward, there will be times when I go a little out of order, but there won't be any major jumps or skips. I may push "Terms of Endearment" to the very end, though.


Wed Nov 11, 2009 1:18 am
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Post Re: SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
Nice review James. Impressive word count too!

My thoughts more or less align with everyone else's. The start and ending are fantastic whereas the middle is a bit uneven.

James: If you had to rank Murnau's films, where would you put Sunrise? Nosferatu is also a 3.5 star film, but that one is in your top 100.

Personally, I like Nosferatu more than Sunrise. It may be less "important" cinematically, but I love how it perfectly marries the fantastic with the artistic. Ditto for Faust, which contains some of the more memorable images I've seen in all of cinema. It too, has a slightly weaker middle section, but it's worth the effort to seek it out. In other words, calvero, I heartily second James' recommendation.

Incidentally, Emil Jannings, one of the stars of Faust is a character in the Inglorious Basterds finale.

As for Murnau, I think both City Girl and Tabu are also worth seeing. The former is the better film, but the latter features Polynesian nudity.


Wed Nov 11, 2009 1:43 am
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Post Re: A Place In The Sun
Patrick wrote:
forwonder wrote:
This story was also made into the George Steven's film "A Place In The Sun". A very good film, featuring Montgomery Cliff and Elizabeth Taylor in their prime.

I'm not so sure silent films are as easy to "get into" as you say though, even for the best ones. I saw "Metropolis", and it was really hard for me to get through it. It had nothing to do with the fact that it's black and white or that it's really old (I liked Fritz Lang's "M".). I found the acting unsatisfactory. It seems like a lot of posturing, and extreme melodrama. The "jerky" motion of the actors also didn't help. I consider myself a film fan, but I still find silent films hard to sit through.


How are you supposed to act when you don't have words? Everything had to be BIG!


It must be hard working with a handicap. Good thing sound movies came along and put the silent ones out of their misery. :lol: :lol: :lol:

Seriously though, silent movies are no longer made not because they can't be made, but because filmmakers don't want to make them anymore. If Martin Scorcese wants to make a silent movie, I'm sure he could, but he's not going to. So much of the appeal of silent movies is in it's historical importance. You can even see it in the reviews of them.


Wed Nov 11, 2009 3:36 am
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Post Re: SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
You definitely have to meet silent movies half way to enjoy them. The ones I have seen that I enjoy the most have been either comedies (Keaton, Chaplin, Lloyd) or German expressionist. In both cases, the limitations of the medium caused the filmmakers to be more inventive in what they were presenting. I agree the dreamlike quality of the German expressionist films help you forget the lack of talking and become immersed. Having seen a fairly high number of films, I’m beginning to value films that show me things I’ve never seen before, and spectacles like the fantasy sequence shown when the Woman from the City is convincing The Man to kill The Wife and join her in the city in 'Sunrise' qualify.

Some of these films are either hard or impossible to find on DVD. I recommend making a list of films you want to see and keeping an eye on the Turner Classic Movies schedule. I have seen both ‘Sunrise’ and ‘Wings’ in the last year by this method.


Wed Nov 11, 2009 12:32 pm
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Post Re: SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
Quote:
"Cimarron" might end up going up before "All Quiet." I'm renting "Cimarron" from Netflix (in fact, it's supposed to arrive tomorrow). I need to watch it twice and write the review before sending it back.


is that the norm for your dvd reviews? watching a film twice before writing the review? impressive.

Quote:
Some of these films are either hard or impossible to find on DVD. I recommend making a list of films you want to see and keeping an eye on the Turner Classic Movies schedule. I have seen both ‘Sunrise’ and ‘Wings’ in the last year by this method.


Yeah, TCM is awesome, they show a ton of silents. I have 'The Crowd' & 'The Wind' on my dvr.

Quote:
I consider myself a film fan, but I still find silent films hard to sit through.


how many silents have you seen? check out 'Passion of Joan of Arc'


Wed Nov 11, 2009 3:00 pm
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Post Re: SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
calvero wrote:
Yeah, TCM is awesome, they show a ton of silents. I have 'The Crowd' & 'The Wind' on my dvr.



Sorry to interrupt this dialogue, but please do tell me what you think of 'The Crowd' after seeing it.


I saw it twice last year via TCM and I had no idea how to feel. It's a sweeping, emotionally draining film that does get alot of small details right (even though I really disliked the ending). Still, it sticks in my head despite the passing of several months since my last exposure to it. I usually take that to mean that the film contains very special elements within that only great films seem to possess. I'd love to hear what you thought about it.


Wed Nov 11, 2009 3:16 pm
Post Re: A Place In The Sun
forwonder wrote:
It must be hard working with a handicap. Good thing sound movies came along and put the silent ones out of their misery. :lol: :lol: :lol:

Seriously though, silent movies are no longer made not because they can't be made, but because filmmakers don't want to make them anymore. If Martin Scorcese wants to make a silent movie, I'm sure he could, but he's not going to. So much of the appeal of silent movies is in it's historical importance. You can even see it in the reviews of them.


Didn't Guy Maddin make a few silent features recently? Any Maddin experts out there? *coughmajoraphasiacough*


Thu Nov 12, 2009 3:01 pm
Post Re: A Place In The Sun (formerly SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS)
ed_metal_head wrote:
forwonder wrote:
It must be hard working with a handicap. Good thing sound movies came along and put the silent ones out of their misery. :lol: :lol: :lol:

Seriously though, silent movies are no longer made not because they can't be made, but because filmmakers don't want to make them anymore. If Martin Scorcese wants to make a silent movie, I'm sure he could, but he's not going to. So much of the appeal of silent movies is in it's historical importance. You can even see it in the reviews of them.


Didn't Guy Maddin make a few silent features recently? Any Maddin experts out there? *coughmajoraphasiacough*


I'm always willing to take this kind of bait. Always. Guy Maddin brings all of his equipment on the bus. (any Violent Femmes fans out there?)

Guy Maddin uses hysterical editing (many of his shots last no more than 12 or so frames) along with techniques 'perfected' at the dawn of film. Think 1895, not thirty years on. I think most of his short work is done in 8mm or 9.5mm, something like that, and features some lovely work by his troupe of foley artists. His work isn't particularly well-seen but he's got a dedicated group of followers who, like me, want all of the strong emoting of silent cinema with a strong dose of modern themes.

Guy Maddin's The Heart of the World is a wonderful starting point. Netflix has his longer-form work. Brand Upon the Brain! is the most recent but I prefer Cowards Bend the Knee -- a hockey love-triangle Studs Lonigan kind of thing, it's a 60-minute tribute to all things Murnau and Eisenstein ramped up with all kinds of stimulants. It's great!

More obscure, and less 'silent', is Begotten. E. Elias Merhige is the filmmakers behind that one -- he also directed Shadow of the Vampire, the lead character of which is Murnau. Full circle fun on this Thursday afternoon.


Thu Nov 12, 2009 3:20 pm
Post Re: SUNRISE: A SONG OF TWO HUMANS (1927)
And his girlfriend, she's at the end, she is starting to cry-y-y-y.


Thu Nov 12, 2009 3:43 pm
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