Discussion of movies and ReelThoughts topics

It is currently Fri Aug 01, 2014 11:33 pm




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 50 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Top 5 movie trilogies 
Author Message
Post Top 5 movie trilogies
I'm new to the forums and I was wondering what everyone's favorite trilogy is. I don't believe there has been a topic like this yet, but it's usually a common topic so I apologize if there is. Mine are...

5. Star Wars - Prequel (very underrated)
4. Die Hard
3. Star Wars - Original
2. The Lord of the Rings
1. The Godfather (yes even the third one - extremely underrated)

I know I missed a LOT of trilogies...and I've never seen the three colors trilogy, so...


Sat Aug 08, 2009 8:23 pm
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
5. The Bourne Identity/Supremacy/Ultimatum
4. Inarritu's "Death" Trilogy (Amores Perros, 21 Grams, Babel)
3. Ozu's "Noriko" trilogy (Late Spring Early, Summer, Tokyo Story)
2. The Three Colors Trilogy
1. The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy


REAL #1: The first (and tragically, last) three seasons of 'Arrested Development'.


Sat Aug 08, 2009 8:45 pm
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
Dynamo3000 wrote:
I'm new to the forums and I was wondering what everyone's favorite trilogy is. I don't believe there has been a topic like this yet, but it's usually a common topic so I apologize if there is. Mine are...

5. Star Wars - Prequel (very underrated)
4. Die Hard
3. Star Wars - Original
2. The Lord of the Rings
1. The Godfather (yes even the third one - extremely underrated)

I know I missed a LOT of trilogies...and I've never seen the three colors trilogy, so...


Die Hard's not a trilogy. Live Free or Die Hard totally counts....or are you not counting Die Hard 2.

As for me....I can't think of 5 trilogies that I've seen all the way through.


Sat Aug 08, 2009 9:09 pm
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
Dynamo3000 wrote:
I'm new to the forums and I was wondering what everyone's favorite trilogy is. I don't believe there has been a topic like this yet, but it's usually a common topic so I apologize if there is. Mine are...

5. Star Wars - Prequel (very underrated)
4. Die Hard
3. Star Wars - Original
2. The Lord of the Rings
1. The Godfather (yes even the third one - extremely underrated)

I know I missed a LOT of trilogies...and I've never seen the three colors trilogy, so...



Hi Dynamo 3000

Welcome to the forum. I hope you have lots of fun here.

In no real order I'd contribute

Apu
Ozu
3 Colors
Kamstein
Quatermass

Good question to start with!

Rob


Sat Aug 08, 2009 9:24 pm
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
Patrick wrote:
Dynamo3000 wrote:
I'm new to the forums and I was wondering what everyone's favorite trilogy is. I don't believe there has been a topic like this yet, but it's usually a common topic so I apologize if there is. Mine are...

5. Star Wars - Prequel (very underrated)
4. Die Hard
3. Star Wars - Original
2. The Lord of the Rings
1. The Godfather (yes even the third one - extremely underrated)

I know I missed a LOT of trilogies...and I've never seen the three colors trilogy, so...


Die Hard's not a trilogy. Live Free or Die Hard totally counts....or are you not counting Die Hard 2.

As for me....I can't think of 5 trilogies that I've seen all the way through.


oops...I totally overlooked the fact that Die Hard has four films, not three. I was actually referring to the original three films...but if I had to make it strictly three films than I would probably replace it with "the matrix."


Sat Aug 08, 2009 9:38 pm
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
Does the Indiana Jones trilogy count? Most people seem to disregard Crystal Skull...short of Star Wars and Godfather, Indy has one of the best three movie series I can think of.

Ooh, ooh...what about Romero's trilogy?

Night of the Living Dead
Dawn of the Dead
Day of the Dead

Classic zombie horror.

And I also consider Alien/Aliens/Alien3 a trilogy. While Alien3 was by far the weakest link, it had a lot to live up to, and was still a decent flick. Alien Resurrection, you say? cough, cough...never heard of it...

And don't forget Eastwood's trilogy. A definite contender:
A Fistful of Dollars
For a Few Dollars More
The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Any others?


Sat Aug 08, 2009 11:41 pm
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
Star Wars
Indiana Jones
Three Colors
Lord of the Rings
Back to the Future


Sun Aug 09, 2009 4:05 am
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
This one's a cinch.

#5 - Herzog's Aguirre (Aguirre, Wrath of God -- Fitzcarraldo -- Cobra Verde)
#4 - Wenders' Road Movies (Alice in the Cities -- The Wrong Move -- Kings of the Road)
#3 - Miller's Mad Max (Mad Max -- The Road Warrior -- Beyond Thunderdome)
#2 - Van Sant's Death Trilogy (Gerry -- Elephant -- Last Days)
#1 - Ozu's Noriko (Late Spring -- Early Summer -- Tokyo Story)

Honorable mentions go to these three:

Kieslowski's Three Colors (Blue -- White -- Red)
Coppola's The Godfather (Parts 1 and 2 especially, of course)
Hiroshi Inagaki's Samurai Trilogy (more Toshiro Mifune = better)


Sun Aug 09, 2009 8:11 am
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
The Dollars Trilogy (A Fistful of Dollars, For A Few Dollars More, The Good The Bad and the Ugly)
The Lord of the Rings Trilogy


Sun Aug 09, 2009 1:57 pm
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
majoraphasia wrote:
This one's a cinch.

#5 - Herzog's Aguirre (Aguirre, Wrath of God -- Fitzcarraldo -- Cobra Verde)
#4 - Wenders' Road Movies (Alice in the Cities -- The Wrong Move -- Kings of the Road)
#3 - Miller's Mad Max (Mad Max -- The Road Warrior -- Beyond Thunderdome)
#2 - Van Sant's Death Trilogy (Gerry -- Elephant -- Last Days)
#1 - Ozu's Noriko (Late Spring -- Early Summer -- Tokyo Story)

Honorable mentions go to these three:

Kieslowski's Three Colors (Blue -- White -- Red)
Coppola's The Godfather (Parts 1 and 2 especially, of course)
Hiroshi Inagaki's Samurai Trilogy (more Toshiro Mifune = better)



Although I find Wenders to be exceedingly overrated, I will admit that is an interesting choice for a trilogy.

'Gerry', and 'Last Days' have no place on any list (although I still admire, and to a certain degree, like, 'Elephant'). I think your runner-ups are largely better than your actual list (I believe that 'Cobra Verde' was a failure, which basically halted me from lauding the Aguirre trilogy as a top five entry). However, I cannot fault you with Ozu's Norkio trilogy. They are a masterful series of films, I'm very glad that I own them.


Sun Aug 09, 2009 2:53 pm
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
The Lord of the Rings
Star Wars IV-VI
Back to the Future
Pirates of the Caribbean
The Matrix


Sun Aug 09, 2009 3:38 pm
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
Evenflow8112 wrote:
majoraphasia wrote:
This one's a cinch.

#5 - Herzog's Aguirre (Aguirre, Wrath of God -- Fitzcarraldo -- Cobra Verde)
#4 - Wenders' Road Movies (Alice in the Cities -- The Wrong Move -- Kings of the Road)
#3 - Miller's Mad Max (Mad Max -- The Road Warrior -- Beyond Thunderdome)
#2 - Van Sant's Death Trilogy (Gerry -- Elephant -- Last Days)
#1 - Ozu's Noriko (Late Spring -- Early Summer -- Tokyo Story)

Honorable mentions go to these three:

Kieslowski's Three Colors (Blue -- White -- Red)
Coppola's The Godfather (Parts 1 and 2 especially, of course)
Hiroshi Inagaki's Samurai Trilogy (more Toshiro Mifune = better)



Although I find Wenders to be exceedingly overrated, I will admit that is an interesting choice for a trilogy.

'Gerry', and 'Last Days' have no place on any list (although I still admire, and to a certain degree, like, 'Elephant'). I think your runner-ups are largely better than your actual list (I believe that 'Cobra Verde' was a failure, which basically halted me from lauding the Aguirre trilogy as a top five entry). However, I cannot fault you with Ozu's Norkio trilogy. They are a masterful series of films, I'm very glad that I own them.



Ah, well. I may be the only one on Earth that believes Gerry and Last Days are wonderful. Not wonderful in the same way as The Godfather, of course, but in terms of what Van Sant was trying to do and how successful he was at pulling it off. I find the films haunting. There is no doubt that there are many, many films that trump most of those appearing on my list. There are films in the runners-up circle that trump those on the list. But, as far as trilogies go, I went with those that I believed carried a theme through to its best conclusion. Cobra Verde certainly isn't a great movie, for example, but it still strikes me as the perfect end for the trilogy. It's a subdued, wounded kind of whimper. I think that's wonderful.

Wenders' isn't overrated. He isn't even particularly well-liked anymore. The three films in my trilogy represent 75% of his good films. You can guess the other one. All three strike me as important contributions to that era of expressionism. We can disagree; I won't have you killed.

Mad Max? I find them all weird, creepy, and kind of brilliant. They may not be but I have nothing but fond memories of watching them repeatedly in high school. They should stick around.

And we agree on the Ozu. Of course. He made it onto two lists, at least. Now, as for the runners up: The Godfather III upets the apple cart. Completely. It's a terrible conclusion for the trilogy, disappointment being a major factor. It never should have been made into a trilogy. The Samurai films are all exciting and fun, a great performance right there in the center. But they aren't groundbreaking, exactly. And they are all a little ridiculous. I love 'em but, really, come on.

And then there's Three Colors. It's awesome that so many people have put it down as worthy. It is. But, for me, it goes like this: GOOD MOVIE, VERY GOOD MOVIE, THE SECOND-BEST MOVIE OF THE 90's. As a trilogy it works but that last film, Red... oh man. I could live on that film alone for a long, long time. The balance of the trilogy is so shifted toward it that it's either #1 on my list or not on it at all. I picked the latter.


Sun Aug 09, 2009 5:20 pm
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
majoraphasia wrote:
Evenflow8112 wrote:
majoraphasia wrote:
This one's a cinch.

#5 - Herzog's Aguirre (Aguirre, Wrath of God -- Fitzcarraldo -- Cobra Verde)
#4 - Wenders' Road Movies (Alice in the Cities -- The Wrong Move -- Kings of the Road)
#3 - Miller's Mad Max (Mad Max -- The Road Warrior -- Beyond Thunderdome)
#2 - Van Sant's Death Trilogy (Gerry -- Elephant -- Last Days)
#1 - Ozu's Noriko (Late Spring -- Early Summer -- Tokyo Story)

Honorable mentions go to these three:

Kieslowski's Three Colors (Blue -- White -- Red)
Coppola's The Godfather (Parts 1 and 2 especially, of course)
Hiroshi Inagaki's Samurai Trilogy (more Toshiro Mifune = better)



Although I find Wenders to be exceedingly overrated, I will admit that is an interesting choice for a trilogy.

'Gerry', and 'Last Days' have no place on any list (although I still admire, and to a certain degree, like, 'Elephant'). I think your runner-ups are largely better than your actual list (I believe that 'Cobra Verde' was a failure, which basically halted me from lauding the Aguirre trilogy as a top five entry). However, I cannot fault you with Ozu's Norkio trilogy. They are a masterful series of films, I'm very glad that I own them.



Ah, well. I may be the only one on Earth that believes Gerry and Last Days are wonderful. Not wonderful in the same way as The Godfather, of course, but in terms of what Van Sant was trying to do and how successful he was at pulling it off. I find the films haunting. There is no doubt that there are many, many films that trump most of those appearing on my list. There are films in the runners-up circle that trump those on the list. But, as far as trilogies go, I went with those that I believed carried a theme through to its best conclusion. Cobra Verde certainly isn't a great movie, for example, but it still strikes me as the perfect end for the trilogy. It's a subdued, wounded kind of whimper. I think that's wonderful.

Wenders' isn't overrated. He isn't even particularly well-liked anymore. The three films in my trilogy represent 75% of his good films. You can guess the other one. All three strike me as important contributions to that era of expressionism. We can disagree; I won't have you killed.

Mad Max? I find them all weird, creepy, and kind of brilliant. They may not be but I have nothing but fond memories of watching them repeatedly in high school. They should stick around.

And we agree on the Ozu. Of course. He made it onto two lists, at least. Now, as for the runners up: The Godfather III upets the apple cart. Completely. It's a terrible conclusion for the trilogy, disappointment being a major factor. It never should have been made into a trilogy. The Samurai films are all exciting and fun, a great performance right there in the center. But they aren't groundbreaking, exactly. And they are all a little ridiculous. I love 'em but, really, come on.

And then there's Three Colors. It's awesome that so many people have put it down as worthy. It is. But, for me, it goes like this: GOOD MOVIE, VERY GOOD MOVIE, THE SECOND-BEST MOVIE OF THE 90's. As a trilogy it works but that last film, Red... oh man. I could live on that film alone for a long, long time. The balance of the trilogy is so shifted toward it that it's either #1 on my list or not on it at all. I picked the latter.


1. Wenders made one great film (Wings Of Desire) and one really good film (Paris Texas), although that particular trilogy is inspired and obscure, which made me admire your choice. I consider him overrated in the same way as Godard is; generally disliked, but nevertheless mentioned endlessly by film enthusiasts. He's like the anti-Cassavette; everything I hear about him makes me like him that much less. His 90's-00's period is nearly as bland and misguided as Mike Figgis' entire career before and after 'Leaving Las Vegas'. But I digress.

2. I really have no opinion one way or the other on 'Mad Max', so I declined comment. I can't give either objection or sanctuary to the trilogy being mentioned. I'm truly at a loss to state either case with conviction.

3. As for the Ozu trilogy, and Three Colors: Red, it is highly inadvisable for someone to disagree about their quality, as I would irreversibly deem them a nincompoop.


Sun Aug 09, 2009 5:47 pm
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
Evenflow8112 wrote:
1. Wenders made one great film (Wings Of Desire) and one really good film (Paris Texas), although that particular trilogy is inspired and obscure, which made me admire your choice. I consider him overrated in the same way as Godard is; generally disliked, but nevertheless mentioned endlessly by film enthusiasts. He's like the anti-Cassavette; everything I hear about him makes me like him that much less. His 90's-00's period is nearly as bland and misguided as Mike Figgis' entire career before and after 'Leaving Las Vegas'. But I digress.


I had forgotten about Paris, Texas. My math should be adjusted to reflect this and, so, it should read something like this:

Wenders' trilogy represents 60% of his good films. Wings of Desire is a good film, in my world, but I'd have to see it again to re-evaluate it with any accuracy. Paris, Texas feels like a film that belongs to a different filmmaker altogether. It's a wonder he pulled it off. His output since 1989 has been marginal at best. The comparison to Godard is exceptionally apt -- both directors are called up to take a bow far too often given their recent output. The last few decades of Godard have been a frightening thing to behold. I've stated elsewhere on this forum that I've disliked-to-hated most of what he's done (Breathless being his best). Godard aside, people should check out the trilogy. Wenders was once a very engaging, interesting filmmaker.

Evenflow8112 wrote:
2. I really have no opinion one way or the other on 'Mad Max', so I declined comment. I can't give either objection or sanctuary to the trilogy being mentioned. I'm truly at a loss to state either case with conviction.


They aren't conventionally tasty, exactly. The first of the trilogy is one of the strangest films I've ever seen and they get a little more familiar after that. They're all very good in all sorts of ways. Entertaining, exciting, humorous... they're very, very weird pictures. Just endlessly weird.

Evenflow8112 wrote:
3. As for the Ozu trilogy, and Three Colors: Red, it is highly inadvisable for someone to disagree about their quality, as I would irreversibly deem them a nincompoop.


Only a reckless, troll-ish sort of person would claim Ozu's films or Red are less than perfect. Red is another on a short list of must-see films. Check out Kieslowski, to all that haven't. He had the ambition of a dozen people. And the music in his films? Oh man. For my money, the best scores ever written (as far as contemporary cinema).


Sun Aug 09, 2009 6:46 pm
Director
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 10, 2009 10:09 pm
Posts: 1232
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
Seeing as a lot of trilogies have now been converted to tetralogies these past couple years, my list now looks like this:

5. Star Wars (Prequels -- agreed....unfairly maligned)
4. Mad Max
3. Back to the Future
2. The Godfather
1. [tie] The Lord of the Rings and Star Wars (Originals)

'Concept' trilogies don't count for me. (Sorry, Three Colors, Man with No Name, Bergman Silence of God trilogy, Van Sant Death trilogy, etc.)


Thu Aug 13, 2009 10:03 pm
Profile
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
5. Star Wars
4. Terminator
3. The Matrix
2. The Lord of the Rings
1. The Godfather (despite the inferior nature of pt. 3)

I don't think that anyone has mentioned terminator yet, though the first two were masterpieces by Cameron, the second surpassing the first, and the third one still managed to be entertaining in the same formula as the others despite not being a Cameron film.


Fri Aug 14, 2009 3:10 pm
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
HomerJ wrote:
Does the Indiana Jones trilogy count? Most people seem to disregard Crystal Skull...short of Star Wars and Godfather, Indy has one of the best three movie series I can think of.

Ooh, ooh...what about Romero's trilogy?

Night of the Living Dead
Dawn of the Dead
Day of the Dead

Classic zombie horror.

And I also consider Alien/Aliens/Alien3 a trilogy. While Alien3 was by far the weakest link, it had a lot to live up to, and was still a decent flick. Alien Resurrection, you say? cough, cough...never heard of it...

And don't forget Eastwood's trilogy. A definite contender:
A Fistful of Dollars
For a Few Dollars More
The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Any others?



Speaking of Zombies, how bout the Evil Dead/Army of Darkness series?


Fri Aug 14, 2009 6:55 pm
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
Moovy1 wrote:
HomerJ wrote:
Does the Indiana Jones trilogy count? Most people seem to disregard Crystal Skull...short of Star Wars and Godfather, Indy has one of the best three movie series I can think of.

Ooh, ooh...what about Romero's trilogy?

Night of the Living Dead
Dawn of the Dead
Day of the Dead

Classic zombie horror.

And I also consider Alien/Aliens/Alien3 a trilogy. While Alien3 was by far the weakest link, it had a lot to live up to, and was still a decent flick. Alien Resurrection, you say? cough, cough...never heard of it...

And don't forget Eastwood's trilogy. A definite contender:
A Fistful of Dollars
For a Few Dollars More
The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Any others?



Speaking of Zombies, how bout the Evil Dead/Army of Darkness series?


Right on, brutha. You had me at "zombies"...


Fri Aug 14, 2009 9:04 pm
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
5. Death Trilogy (Alejandro Gonzales Innaritu)
4. Death Trilogy (Gus Van Sant)
3. Three Colors Trilogy
2. Apu Trilogy
1. Star Wars Trilogy (1977, 1980, 1983)

Special entry: Jersey Trilogy.

Disclaimer: I have not seen all three Lord of the Rings films, nor have I seen Sergio Leone's filmography (minus the fantastic Once Upon a Time in America) so they cannot be placed on here. I also haven't seen any of the Back to the Future films, so I guess I fail.


Sun Aug 16, 2009 2:29 am
Post Re: Top 5 movie trilogies
I'd like to hear/read what people think Alejandro Gonzales Innaritu's trilogy. Or, really, any of the single films.

I see Amores perros, 21 Grams, and Babel getting lots of respect and I always wonder: why? Ignoring Amores perros, a genuinely great movie, I've deeply hated the other two. 21 Grams struck me as a gigantic fraud of a melodrama, a movie so in love with coincidence and its ridiculously unnecessary that it never found the time to rise above its silly Movie Of The Week silliness. I really hated it. Every phoned-in structure (recovering drug addict, car accident, heart problem, renewed hope for love) could have been written by a computer that had cracked the code of Harlequin Romance novels. I can see how the structure could be taken as impressive (it didn't work for me seeing that it was, seemingly, totally arbitrary) but the pure wrenching pain was as transparent, for me, as a daytime soap. Babel, less hateful but still plenty fraudulent, used a similar box of tools (with no chronology gimmick) to tear the hearts out of its audience. It's a pain factory, a silly trifle that begs the audience to let the misery in while never once questioning the authority of its melodrama-loving creator.

Now... I'll freely admit that I was in a fairly miserable place when I saw the last two of the three. I could be wrong; I'm going on memory alone, here. But the distaste they've left has been so profound that I'm always (sincerely) interested to hear that they're beloved films.

Why?

Tell me I'm wrong... there's every chance in the world that I am. Why do these films work for people?


Sun Aug 16, 2009 6:12 am
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 50 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forum/DivisionCore.
Translated by Xaphos © 2007, 2008, 2009 phpBB.fr