Discussion of movies and ReelThoughts topics

It is currently Sat Oct 25, 2014 11:46 am




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 157 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 8  Next
Kurt Cobain- 20 years 
Author Message
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2533
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Kurt Cobain- 20 years
Read a good article on this

http://www.spiked-online.com/newsite/ar ... fans/14883

I gotta agree, for the most part. I bought Nevermind in 1999 when I was 17. Two things struck me:

1. It was musically very good

2. Kids don't need this depression foisted on them

RIP though

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Wed Apr 09, 2014 3:34 am
Profile
Auteur
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 12:02 pm
Posts: 3741
Location: Zion, IL
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
I was never a huge Nirvana fan, I honestly found them overrated and I much prefer 80s rock over Grunge, which I tend to find boring and/or depressing, musically I was never impressed with them.

Cobain was actually quite disillusioned with the band's success, claiming he never wanted to be famous(he was particularly annoyed that flannel shirts were becoming a music trend for grunge bands, the band wore those simply because they were the warmest clothes they could find, it wasn't about making a fashion statement)

Speaking of which, I heard a funny story about Cobain today on a local radio program(Sixxth Sense with Motley Crue's Nikki Sixx on 102.9 The Hog)- Kurt and Courtney Love brought Francis Bean into the studio when she was just a baby, and he recorded "Rape Me" while she was in the studio(and the station played a version of the song with Francis crying in the background) :lol:

BTW, does anyone believe those crazy conspiracy theories that Courtney had something to do with his death? I personally think that's complete and utter nonsense.


Wed Apr 09, 2014 4:32 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2533
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
Apart from a tiny, outsider clique, grunge was largely bypassed here. We were aware of its existence, and obviously knew of Nirvana, but many of us just didn't get it. "It" being the supposed moral superiority of misery.

I have Nirvana's singles collection album in my car, and perhaps give it a whirl once a year. I greatly enjoy it in short blasts, but like a guy I knew back when I was 17 once said to me "you don't want to get your head into all that shit, mate".

The article I linked to ultimately sums up my own views on the band.

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Wed Apr 09, 2014 5:47 am
Profile
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jun 20, 2010 4:04 pm
Posts: 1746
Location: New Hampshire
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
What has been lost is that Cobain had a real sense of humor about his work. He really didn't hate everything; a lot of what he wrote was very tongue-in-cheek. I think a good example of this is my favorite Nirvana song, "I Hate Myself and Want to Die." It was written as a darkly humorous response to how the press perceived Nirvana. And it was a really good song.

_________________
Death is pretty final
I'm collecting vinyl
I'm gonna DJ at the end of the world.


Wed Apr 09, 2014 7:03 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2533
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
Sexual Chocolate wrote:
What has been lost is that Cobain had a real sense of humor about his work. He really didn't hate everything; a lot of what he wrote was very tongue-in-cheek. I think a good example of this is my favorite Nirvana song, "I Hate Myself and Want to Die." It was written as a darkly humorous response to how the press perceived Nirvana. And it was a really good song.


I don't recall the song, and I have no reason to doubt you.

But Cobain - an intelligent man - would have been acutely aware than many Nirvana drones would have taken it at face value, given their position on, well ... everything

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Wed Apr 09, 2014 7:47 am
Profile
Second Unit Director
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 12:57 am
Posts: 270
Location: Melbourne, Australia.
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
NotHughGrant wrote:
Apart from a tiny, outsider clique, grunge was largely bypassed here. We were aware of its existence, and obviously knew of Nirvana, but many of us just didn't get it. "It" being the supposed moral superiority of misery.

I have Nirvana's singles collection album in my car, and perhaps give it a whirl once a year. I greatly enjoy it in short blasts, but like a guy I knew back when I was 17 once said to me "you don't want to get your head into all that shit, mate".

The article I linked to ultimately sums up my own views on the band.


Yeah nah... I reckon Nirvana was bypassed in most countries, they weren't really that big and god knows they weren't doing anything original. Nobody got it man, it was like you had to listen to Smells like Teenage Spirit 30 fucking times, just to confirm the bullshit lyrics, nevermind that. By then who gave a fuck about In Utero man? They certainly didn't define an era or any shit like that, everyone loved Pearl Jam and then they decided to give Nirvana a go with their version of that grunge crap.

My plane back to planet earth is due soon.

_________________
I'm very sorry for your loss. Your mother was a terribly attractive woman - Royal Tenenbaum


Wed Apr 09, 2014 10:34 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2533
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
My sarcasm alarm just beeped.

All I can say is, here, in my bubble in the North of England, no-one gave much of a shit.

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Wed Apr 09, 2014 10:59 am
Profile
Second Unit Director

Joined: Sun Dec 16, 2012 12:14 am
Posts: 311
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
Sexual Chocolate wrote:
What has been lost is that Cobain had a real sense of humor about his work. He really didn't hate everything; a lot of what he wrote was very tongue-in-cheek. I think a good example of this is my favorite Nirvana song, "I Hate Myself and Want to Die." It was written as a darkly humorous response to how the press perceived Nirvana. And it was a really good song.


One of my favorite songs of his lyrically is "In Bloom." It's just a brilliant takedown of people who don't really pay attention to what a band is saying, which is all the more ironic given that it was written before they really made it big.


Sat Apr 12, 2014 9:44 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2533
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
He's the one, who likes all our pretty songs, and he likes to shoot his gun?

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Sat Apr 12, 2014 3:55 pm
Profile
Second Unit Director

Joined: Sun Dec 16, 2012 12:14 am
Posts: 311
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
NotHughGrant wrote:
He's the one, who likes all our pretty songs, and he likes to shoot his gun?


Uh huh, the key is the next phrase...

"But he knows not what it means when I say, yeah..."


Sun Apr 13, 2014 2:18 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 6:26 pm
Posts: 2157
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
NotHughGrant wrote:
2. Kids don't need this depression foisted on them
Depression isn't something that gets foisted on people by popular music. Or movies, for that matter.

_________________
The temptation is to like what you should like--not what you do like... another temptation is to come up with an interesting reason for liking it that may not actually be the reason you like it.


Sun Apr 13, 2014 6:45 am
Profile
Cinematographer

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 8:09 pm
Posts: 724
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
Gwaihir wrote:
Sexual Chocolate wrote:
What has been lost is that Cobain had a real sense of humor about his work. He really didn't hate everything; a lot of what he wrote was very tongue-in-cheek. I think a good example of this is my favorite Nirvana song, "I Hate Myself and Want to Die." It was written as a darkly humorous response to how the press perceived Nirvana. And it was a really good song.


One of my favorite songs of his lyrically is "In Bloom." It's just a brilliant takedown of people who don't really pay attention to what a band is saying, which is all the more ironic given that it was written before they really made it big.


That song is essentially their "Glass Onion" in how it gives listeners a ton of nonsense to pour over while simultaneously encouraging them to interpret the lyrics. Makes sense too, Cobain being a big Beatles fan and all.

I was a big fan of the band when they were around, and still am. It's become kind of trendy to say they're overrated, but that comes with any huge, influential, era-defining band of any time. It's impossible for me to separate them from my teenage years and the nostalgic feelings that accompany them, so feel free to write off my opinion just like I write off the "Nirvana is overrated" crowd.


Mon Apr 14, 2014 12:10 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2533
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
Ken wrote:
NotHughGrant wrote:
2. Kids don't need this depression foisted on them
Depression isn't something that gets foisted on people by popular music. Or movies, for that matter.


Nirvana were big enough to shape (to some extent) the cultural landscape. Of course there's an element of chicken and egg; of supply and demand. But what they said mattered to a lot of impressionable people

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Mon Apr 14, 2014 3:02 pm
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2533
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
PeachyPete wrote:
Gwaihir wrote:
Sexual Chocolate wrote:
What has been lost is that Cobain had a real sense of humor about his work. He really didn't hate everything; a lot of what he wrote was very tongue-in-cheek. I think a good example of this is my favorite Nirvana song, "I Hate Myself and Want to Die." It was written as a darkly humorous response to how the press perceived Nirvana. And it was a really good song.


One of my favorite songs of his lyrically is "In Bloom." It's just a brilliant takedown of people who don't really pay attention to what a band is saying, which is all the more ironic given that it was written before they really made it big.


That song is essentially their "Glass Onion" in how it gives listeners a ton of nonsense to pour over while simultaneously encouraging them to interpret the lyrics. Makes sense too, Cobain being a big Beatles fan and all.

I was a big fan of the band when they were around, and still am. It's become kind of trendy to say they're overrated, but that comes with any huge, influential, era-defining band of any time. It's impossible for me to separate them from my teenage years and the nostalgic feelings that accompany them, so feel free to write off my opinion just like I write off the "Nirvana is overrated" crowd.


I don't consider them overrated. They were great at what they did. It's just the message I have an issue with.

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Tue Apr 15, 2014 6:43 am
Profile
Second Unit Director

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 1:45 pm
Posts: 435
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
NotHughGrant, you were 17 in 1999? That'd make you eleven or twelve at the time Nirvana hit the big time and disappeared within three years. I'm not sure that anybody could really evaluate the (pop) cultural impact or importance of a rock band at that age. I know I couldn't - unless Duran Duran are generally considered to be the best band of all time.

Nirvana were a strange phenomenon. A friend and I were about to go to a gig of this completely unknown band from Seattle in a pretty small club (must've been late 1991), but had to cancel because we had to take an exam the next day. To this day, my friend is still angry for getting a degree. Two weeks or so later, 'Smells Like Teen Spirit' was released and immediately hit it big. Everybody loved it and everybody bought 'Nevermind'. Of course pretentious teenage cognescenti like yours truly were quick to point out that "Smells Like Teen Spirit" was just a souped-up variation of "Louie Louie" and that "Come as You Are" was a slowed-down and boring version of Killing Joke's "Eighties". Otherwise, how would indie rock loving types be able to distinguish themselves from the pits of popular taste anymore? Because that's what was truly important about Nirvana: They brought the sound of Alternative Rock into the mainstream. Before Nirvana, you wouldn't hear anything like this on top 40 radio, now "Smells like Teen Spirit" was omnipresent. Interestingly, few people I knew apart from those who already were into indie/alternative rock (or at least hard rock/metal) bought any of the successive re-releases or the second Nirvana album. They really were close to being a one album band and I'm sure that they would've been largely forgotten today if Kurt Cobain hadn't killed himself. I was at a party when the news of Cobain's suicide broke and a lot of people started to cry and claim they were deeply moved ad devastated. At the time, I thought that quite a few of them were affecting these feelings, because I associated their musical taste with Milli Vanilli (don't ask) rather than rock music. Perhaps I was unfair, though, and they were merely emotional due to severe inebreation. Anyway. The media were quick to assign great importance to Kurt Cobain and his passing for the "Generation X" (whatever that meant, probably me) and this narrative holds up to this day, although Nirvana were nothing but a highly successful rock band with a new(ish) sound and a couple of great hits while he was alive. So in this sense, Nirvana are hugely overrated.

As for "foisting depression on teenage listeners", I don't think Nirvana are worse offenders than a lot of other rock band peddling teenage angst. The Cure were one of the biggest bands of the 80ies and they were proper Goths, after all.


Tue Apr 15, 2014 8:28 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2533
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
Unke wrote:
NotHughGrant, you were 17 in 1999? That'd make you eleven or twelve at the time Nirvana hit the big time and disappeared within three years. I'm not sure that anybody could really evaluate the (pop) cultural impact or importance of a rock band at that age. I know I couldn't - unless Duran Duran are generally considered to be the best band of all time.

Nirvana were a strange phenomenon. A friend and I were about to go to a gig of this completely unknown band from Seattle in a pretty small club (must've been late 1991), but had to cancel because we had to take an exam the next day. To this day, my friend is still angry for getting a degree. Two weeks or so later, 'Smells Like Teen Spirit' was released and immediately hit it big. Everybody loved it and everybody bought 'Nevermind'. Of course pretentious teenage cognescenti like yours truly were quick to point out that "Smells Like Teen Spirit" was just a souped-up variation of "Louie Louie" and that "Come as You Are" was a slowed-down and boring version of Killing Joke's "Eighties". Otherwise, how would indie rock loving types be able to distinguish themselves from the pits of popular taste anymore? Because that's what was truly important about Nirvana: They brought the sound of Alternative Rock into the mainstream. Before Nirvana, you wouldn't hear anything like this on top 40 radio, now "Smells like Teen Spirit" was omnipresent. Interestingly, few people I knew apart from those who already were into indie/alternative rock (or at least hard rock/metal) bought any of the successive re-releases or the second Nirvana album. They really were close to being a one album band and I'm sure that they would've been largely forgotten today if Kurt Cobain hadn't killed himself. I was at a party when the news of Cobain's suicide broke and a lot of people started to cry and claim they were deeply moved ad devastated. At the time, I thought that quite a few of them were affecting these feelings, because I associated their musical taste with Milli Vanilli (don't ask) rather than rock music. Perhaps I was unfair, though, and they were merely emotional due to severe inebreation. Anyway. The media were quick to assign great importance to Kurt Cobain and his passing for the "Generation X" (whatever that meant, probably me) and this narrative holds up to this day, although Nirvana were nothing but a highly successful rock band with a new(ish) sound and a couple of great hits while he was alive. So in this sense, Nirvana are hugely overrated.

As for "foisting depression on teenage listeners", I don't think Nirvana are worse offenders than a lot of other rock band peddling teenage angst. The Cure were one of the biggest bands of the 80ies and they were proper Goths, after all.


I was 17 in 1999, when I got around to buying Nevermind. But I wasn't purely ignorant beforehand. Nirvana were kind of quasi-prominent in the UK in that they had a small, but greatly devoted niche following.

Without wishing to cast aspersions or indulge in stereotypes, we all know what that niche was. And that's fair enough. I've been to a few mosh pits myself.

Of course the demand for Nirvana was to a greater extent the demand for the music of self-hatred. But it works the other way too, and a band as prominent as Nirvana, and as good as Nirvana, also created their landscape, as well as being created by it.

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Tue Apr 15, 2014 8:45 am
Profile
Cinematographer

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 8:09 pm
Posts: 724
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
Unke wrote:
NotHughGrant, you were 17 in 1999? That'd make you eleven or twelve at the time Nirvana hit the big time and disappeared within three years. I'm not sure that anybody could really evaluate the (pop) cultural impact or importance of a rock band at that age. I know I couldn't - unless Duran Duran are generally considered to be the best band of all time.

Nirvana were a strange phenomenon. A friend and I were about to go to a gig of this completely unknown band from Seattle in a pretty small club (must've been late 1991), but had to cancel because we had to take an exam the next day. To this day, my friend is still angry for getting a degree. Two weeks or so later, 'Smells Like Teen Spirit' was released and immediately hit it big. Everybody loved it and everybody bought 'Nevermind'. Of course pretentious teenage cognescenti like yours truly were quick to point out that "Smells Like Teen Spirit" was just a souped-up variation of "Louie Louie" and that "Come as You Are" was a slowed-down and boring version of Killing Joke's "Eighties". Otherwise, how would indie rock loving types be able to distinguish themselves from the pits of popular taste anymore? Because that's what was truly important about Nirvana: They brought the sound of Alternative Rock into the mainstream. Before Nirvana, you wouldn't hear anything like this on top 40 radio, now "Smells like Teen Spirit" was omnipresent.


Excellent post, Unke. I don't think it's impossible, or even all that difficult honestly, to evaluate the cultural impact of bands from our youth 20+ years removed from said youth. You're right that a 12 or 13 year old is unlikely to be able to assess cultural impact in the moment, but how many people of any age are able to do that with a high degree of accuracy? It takes time and some perspective to properly evaluate any artist, regardless of the listener's age.

Like you said, though, Nirvana is an important band in the history of music. For good or bad, they brought alternative/grunge to the mainstream. They were/are the definitive band of the 90s, whether you like their music or not.

Unke wrote:
Interestingly, few people I knew apart from those who already were into indie/alternative rock (or at least hard rock/metal) bought any of the successive re-releases or the second Nirvana album. They really were close to being a one album band and I'm sure that they would've been largely forgotten today if Kurt Cobain hadn't killed himself. I was at a party when the news of Cobain's suicide broke and a lot of people started to cry and claim they were deeply moved ad devastated. At the time, I thought that quite a few of them were affecting these feelings, because I associated their musical taste with Milli Vanilli (don't ask) rather than rock music. Perhaps I was unfair, though, and they were merely emotional due to severe inebreation. Anyway. The media were quick to assign great importance to Kurt Cobain and his passing for the "Generation X" (whatever that meant, probably me) and this narrative holds up to this day, although Nirvana were nothing but a highly successful rock band with a new(ish) sound and a couple of great hits while he was alive. So in this sense, Nirvana are hugely overrated.

As for "foisting depression on teenage listeners", I don't think Nirvana are worse offenders than a lot of other rock band peddling teenage angst. The Cure were one of the biggest bands of the 80ies and they were proper Goths, after all.


Well, In Utero was a pretty huge album here in the US. Not sure how it did overseas, but it performed well on the charts here and was well received by critics. It wasn't the era-defining album that Nevermind was, but it was a really, really big deal. They definitely weren't close to being a one album band here, by any stretch of the imagination (the MTV Unplugged album was also a big deal, but I'm fairly certain that was released after the suicide). They were one of the biggest bands in the world when Cobain killed himself, and he was one of the most recognizable rock stars on the planet. Sure, as with any super huge celebrity death, I'm sure some people did embellish just how much they cared about him, but there was also a good deal of genuine emotion and shock that came out of people.


Tue Apr 15, 2014 9:13 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2533
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
Quote:
They were/are the definitive band of the 90s, whether you like their music or not.


This is a highly USA-centric statement.

Here, Oasis were far bigger than Nirvana. Neither Nirvana's music, nor their cultural legacy had a great deal of mainstream success. For better or worse, Britpop was about empowerment (and wearing smart trainers), not wishing you were dead because suburban life was so dull.

Rock music is largely a working class phenomena, and here, Nirvana are now largely the preserve of middle-class intellectuals who go out of their way to appreciate other cultures, and look down their nose at their own. Does that make it less real? Well yeah, probably. But that was their thing. I have no doubt in the US it was a powerful and culturally resonant movement. But I'm glad I wasn't there when it was. Because life is hard enough for many teenagers already

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Tue Apr 15, 2014 10:55 am
Profile
Second Unit Director

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 1:45 pm
Posts: 435
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
PeachyPete wrote:
Unke wrote:
Interestingly, few people I knew apart from those who already were into indie/alternative rock (or at least hard rock/metal) bought any of the successive re-releases or the second Nirvana album. They really were close to being a one album band and I'm sure that they would've been largely forgotten today if Kurt Cobain hadn't killed himself. I was at a party when the news of Cobain's suicide broke and a lot of people started to cry and claim they were deeply moved ad devastated. At the time, I thought that quite a few of them were affecting these feelings, because I associated their musical taste with Milli Vanilli (don't ask) rather than rock music. Perhaps I was unfair, though, and they were merely emotional due to severe inebreation. Anyway. The media were quick to assign great importance to Kurt Cobain and his passing for the "Generation X" (whatever that meant, probably me) and this narrative holds up to this day, although Nirvana were nothing but a highly successful rock band with a new(ish) sound and a couple of great hits while he was alive. So in this sense, Nirvana are hugely overrated.

As for "foisting depression on teenage listeners", I don't think Nirvana are worse offenders than a lot of other rock band peddling teenage angst. The Cure were one of the biggest bands of the 80ies and they were proper Goths, after all.


Well, In Utero was a pretty huge album here in the US. Not sure how it did overseas, but it performed well on the charts here and was well received by critics. It wasn't the era-defining album that Nevermind was, but it was a really, really big deal. They definitely weren't close to being a one album band here, by any stretch of the imagination (the MTV Unplugged album was also a big deal, but I'm fairly certain that was released after the suicide). They were one of the biggest bands in the world when Cobain killed himself, and he was one of the most recognizable rock stars on the planet. Sure, as with any super huge celebrity death, I'm sure some people did embellish just how much they cared about him, but there was also a good deal of genuine emotion and shock that came out of people.


There appears to be a difference between the U.S. and (at least) Germany, indeed. I just checked and "Nevermind" was in the German album charts for 154 weeks, peaking at #3, whereas "In Utero" was in the album charts for a mere 28 weeks, peaking at #14. In contrast, both albums were #1 selling albums in the U.S. (as well as the UK), staying in the charts for 263 weeks and 87 weeks respectively.

Of course, album sales don't mean everything when you're evaluating the cultural impact of a rock band, but they may be an indicator. For what it's worth, the German album charts and a comparison of "Nevermind" with conteporary rock albums would also point in the direction that Nirvana weren't quite as massive at the time as their reputation would suggest. Nevermind sold roughly as much as Guns 'n' Roses's "Use your Ilusion I" and significantly less than "Use your Illusion II" and REM's "Out of Time". All of which were outsold by a big margin by Genesis's "We can't dance" :o


Tue Apr 15, 2014 12:24 pm
Profile
Second Unit Director
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 12:57 am
Posts: 270
Location: Melbourne, Australia.
Post Re: Kurt Cobain- 20 years
Unke wrote:
NotHughGrant, you were 17 in 1999? That'd make you eleven or twelve at the time Nirvana hit the big time and disappeared within three years. I'm not sure that anybody could really evaluate the (pop) cultural impact or importance of a rock band at that age. I know I couldn't - unless Duran Duran are generally considered to be the best band of all time.

Nirvana were a strange phenomenon. A friend and I were about to go to a gig of this completely unknown band from Seattle in a pretty small club (must've been late 1991), but had to cancel because we had to take an exam the next day. To this day, my friend is still angry for getting a degree. Two weeks or so later, 'Smells Like Teen Spirit' was released and immediately hit it big. Everybody loved it and everybody bought 'Nevermind'. Of course pretentious teenage cognescenti like yours truly were quick to point out that "Smells Like Teen Spirit" was just a souped-up variation of "Louie Louie" and that "Come as You Are" was a slowed-down and boring version of Killing Joke's "Eighties". Otherwise, how would indie rock loving types be able to distinguish themselves from the pits of popular taste anymore? Because that's what was truly important about Nirvana: They brought the sound of Alternative Rock into the mainstream. Before Nirvana, you wouldn't hear anything like this on top 40 radio, now "Smells like Teen Spirit" was omnipresent. Interestingly, few people I knew apart from those who already were into indie/alternative rock (or at least hard rock/metal) bought any of the successive re-releases or the second Nirvana album. They really were close to being a one album band and I'm sure that they would've been largely forgotten today if Kurt Cobain hadn't killed himself. I was at a party when the news of Cobain's suicide broke and a lot of people started to cry and claim they were deeply moved ad devastated. At the time, I thought that quite a few of them were affecting these feelings, because I associated their musical taste with Milli Vanilli (don't ask) rather than rock music. Perhaps I was unfair, though, and they were merely emotional due to severe inebreation. Anyway. The media were quick to assign great importance to Kurt Cobain and his passing for the "Generation X" (whatever that meant, probably me) and this narrative holds up to this day, although Nirvana were nothing but a highly successful rock band with a new(ish) sound and a couple of great hits while he was alive. So in this sense, Nirvana are hugely overrated.

As for "foisting depression on teenage listeners", I don't think Nirvana are worse offenders than a lot of other rock band peddling teenage angst. The Cure were one of the biggest bands of the 80ies and they were proper Goths, after all.


That was a wicked read. Couldn't get much more spot on than that perspective from my seat.

_________________
I'm very sorry for your loss. Your mother was a terribly attractive woman - Royal Tenenbaum


Tue Apr 15, 2014 12:44 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 157 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 8  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forum/DivisionCore.
Translated by Xaphos © 2007, 2008, 2009 phpBB.fr