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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

Know what? Maybe this is a result of my being one of those few people who wasn't 100% jazzed about the Lord of the Rings movies (the Star Wars trilogy of this generation? really? have you seen Star Wars?), but I thought this was a pretty kickass little fantasy adventure. Maybe there were a few flashbacks and digressions that slowed things down at times, and maybe the scope of the film was blown up with comparison to the novel, but I'm not sure how problematic they were when the experience of the film is taken as a whole. As someone said in the not too distant past, just treat it as a prequel to the Lord of the Rings and it works just fine. I particularly enjoyed Martin Freeman's performance--he's perfectly cast as Bilbo. I'm looking forward to seeing the Desolation of Smaug very soon.

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Sun Jan 05, 2014 10:03 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Great Gatsby (2013)

I generally enjoy Baz Luhrmann's excess, but there is a point where it is just humanly too much, especially those voice-over and running time. Having finished the novel yesterday, there is absolutely no need for the film to go over 2 hours, or for the style to be distracting from the plot so often. That said, when it works it really hits: Gatsby's reveal, him meeting Daisy, the flashbacks, the wealthy's lifestyle, etc. As with other Lhurmann films, it passes by entertainingly enough. I also really liked the whole cast. Carey Mulligan maybe fell a little short in the difficult role, but I thought Elizabeth Debicki as Jordan Baker and especially Leonardo DiCaprio are the standouts. 6/10


Mon Jan 06, 2014 1:50 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
NotHughGrant wrote:
Quote:
The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943)
...


The timing and content of Blimp have an almost supernatural poignancy given the subject matter.

Not only did WW2 kill the empire, it was also the death of the highest minded ideals of 'fair play'. Or at least the ideals of the ideals. The film recognised these were seldom realised in practice, but the demise for what 'Blimp' stood for was not a good thing.

I really like this film, because it creates an almost seamless narrative between the story of a man, the story of a country, and the story of how ideas are extinguished by reality.

Blimp in the comic form was a crude stereotype. A sneering dig at colonial excesses. The film quite bravely humanizes something seemingly 'unhumanizable'


Good points and, come to think of it, when the German officer, after having been a POW in World War I, states that he is't returning to the same country he left anymore, because there won't be any place for a military man like himself, Powell and Pressburger may have intended that as a warning of sorts: "Look, this is going to happen to our military establishment after World War II as well".

Indeed, this is an exceptionally intelligent movie. I just found it a shame that thinking about the movie is more engaging than actually watching it (for me, that is).
Ken wrote:
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

Know what? Maybe this is a result of my being one of those few people who wasn't 100% jazzed about the Lord of the Rings movies (the Star Wars trilogy of this generation? really? have you seen Star Wars?), but I thought this was a pretty kickass little fantasy adventure. Maybe there were a few flashbacks and digressions that slowed things down at times, and maybe the scope of the film was blown up with comparison to the novel, but I'm not sure how problematic they were when the experience of the film is taken as a whole. As someone said in the not too distant past, just treat it as a prequel to the Lord of the Rings and it works just fine. I particularly enjoyed Martin Freeman's performance--he's perfectly cast as Bilbo. I'm looking forward to seeing the Desolation of Smaug very soon.


I agree that Martin Freeman is perfect for the role, which is something I forgot to mention in my earlier posts. I liked him quite a bit in 'The Office' and 'Sherlock' as well.


Mon Jan 06, 2014 3:03 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
300 *** (Rewatch)

I re-watched this today, reluctantly. I was 13 when this came out and I really didn't like it at the time. To my surprise I liked it a lot more today at 20 years of age. I guess I always thought it was one of those movies that would get dumber and dumber as you get older, but I was pretty damn entertained. The ending packed a heavier punch this time and the stylized fights were cooler than I remember. I dunno, maybe I was just in the mood.

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Mon Jan 06, 2014 3:32 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Le passé (The Past) (2013)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2404461/
Asghar Farhadi's follow up to the sublime A Separation covers much of the same themes, but in a significantly less minimalistic manner. The 1st half of the movie mostly follows Ahmad, who after being estranged from his family for a number years returns to Paris (from Tehran) on request of the wife (Marie) for a divorce so she can marry would-be husband no. 4 (I think). She already has two daughters (although not from Ahmad, who she has no children with), the oldest of whom (Lucie) is none too happy about her mother finding yet another husband (she's still fond of Ahmad). To-be hubby no. 4 (Samir) already lives with Marie together with his young son while his wife currently lies in a coma in hospital after a failed suicide. The 2nd half of the film revolves mostly around Samid desperately trying to make all this work out somehow. The best scene has Ahmad and Samir sitting opposite each other at the kitchen table saying literally nothing at all. Just pure gold. Yep, dysfunction runs rife through this near masterpiece of family drama.
IMO easily as good as A Separation. Loved it.
8.5/10. (tempted to go 9 here, but I'd have to see it again).


Mon Jan 06, 2014 3:43 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Gedmud wrote:
300 *** (Rewatch)

I re-watched this today, reluctantly. I was 13 when this came out and I really didn't like it at the time. To my surprise I liked it a lot more today at 20 years of age. I guess I always thought it was one of those movies that would get dumber and dumber as you get older, but I was pretty damn entertained. The ending packed a heavier punch this time and the stylized fights were cooler than I remember. I dunno, maybe I was just in the mood.



A perfectly serviceable film if you beforehand accept the basic premise that it is utter bollocks.

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Mon Jan 06, 2014 5:36 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
NotHughGrant wrote:
Gedmud wrote:
300 *** (Rewatch)

I re-watched this today, reluctantly. I was 13 when this came out and I really didn't like it at the time. To my surprise I liked it a lot more today at 20 years of age. I guess I always thought it was one of those movies that would get dumber and dumber as you get older, but I was pretty damn entertained. The ending packed a heavier punch this time and the stylized fights were cooler than I remember. I dunno, maybe I was just in the mood.



A perfectly serviceable film if you beforehand accept the basic premise that it is utter bollocks.


Agreed. Particularly important to remember that the movie is told from the perspective of a Spartan soldier trying to drum up morale for the other troops -- it's supposed to be a tall tale, not history

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Mon Jan 06, 2014 7:25 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Unke

Quote:
Good points and, come to think of it, when the German officer, after having been a POW in World War I, states that he is't returning to the same country he left anymore, because there won't be any place for a military man like himself, Powell and Pressburger may have intended that as a warning of sorts: "Look, this is going to happen to our military establishment after World War II as well".

Indeed, this is an exceptionally intelligent movie. I just found it a shame that thinking about the movie is more engaging than actually watching it (for me, that is).


I think that is a fair point. The film is very deliberate (perhaps preachy even) in its narrative, and as (I think) Kunzo mentioned before, the inherent technical limitations probably exacerbate this further.

But ... and it is a big but, the film gets so many things right. There is a large dose of wit running throughout. I mean, that Turkish Bath scene that introduces a damaged-by-reality-but-still-clinging-to-his-ideas Candy is hilarious, but then also quite sad once the film gives you the context of his 'form'. This is even expressly acknowledged - "you mock my moustache, but you do not know why I grew it". Obviously referring to both the physical AND emotional scars War and life have dealt him.

In retrospect, (because I wasn't around in 1943), I find it a bit odd Churchill hated it. For me, the film is actually largely pro-British. It acknowledges certain significant failings, but it also takes a serious swipe at the prevailing liberal characterisation of bluff old servicemen as dinosaurs.

It actually says "yes, these people may appear silly, but they were the products and the guardians of a sense of chivalry and a reference to something approaching rules and conduct, even in the most brutal of times. And their demise is NOT wholly a cause for celebration".

I think it's a profound piece of film making. And one that as you say, correctly concluded that the new world would hardly ever again reference "the national sporting club rules" etc.

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Mon Jan 06, 2014 8:28 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Meh, I didn't think much of 300 the first time I saw it. Slightly enjoyed it, but that was it... but the few times I've tried to rewatch it on TV, I just couldn't stand it.



Anyway, last night I saw A Hijacking, a Danish thriller/drama about a cargo ship being hijacked by pirates. Great performances and overall direction. The pace might be slow for some, but it sure manages to build dread and tension about what's going to happen. Pretty good film. Grade: B+

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Mon Jan 06, 2014 8:45 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
NotHughGrant wrote:
Gedmud wrote:
300 *** (Rewatch)

I re-watched this today, reluctantly. I was 13 when this came out and I really didn't like it at the time. To my surprise I liked it a lot more today at 20 years of age. I guess I always thought it was one of those movies that would get dumber and dumber as you get older, but I was pretty damn entertained. The ending packed a heavier punch this time and the stylized fights were cooler than I remember. I dunno, maybe I was just in the mood.



A perfectly serviceable film if you beforehand accept the basic premise that it is utter bollocks.


Agreed. Particularly important to remember that the movie is told from the perspective of a Spartan soldier trying to drum up morale for the other troops -- it's supposed to be a tall tale, not history


I like '300' very much for what it is: The adaptation of a comic book, which delibaretely erases all subtleties and tells a macho, testosterone-fuelled action version of Herodotus's account of the ancient battle of Thermopylae. Herodotus tried to glorify the Spartans' conduct and create a legend as well. For instance, rather silly lines like, when the Persians inform the Greeks that their arrows will be so numerous that they will block out all sunlight, a Spartan saying "Then we shall fight in the shade." are actually taken from Herodutus. I never understood the criticism that the movie doesn't provide a historically correct account.

NotHughGrant wrote:
Unke
Indeed, this is an exceptionally intelligent movie. I just found it a shame that thinking about the movie is more engaging than actually watching it (for me, that is).


I think that is a fair point. The film is very deliberate (perhaps preachy even) in its narrative, and as (I think) Kunzo mentioned before, the inherent technical limitations probably exacerbate this further.

But ... and it is a big but, the film gets so many things right. There is a large dose of wit running throughout. I mean, that Turkish Bath scene that introduces a damaged-by-reality-but-still-clinging-to-his-ideas Candy is hilarious, but then also quite sad once the film gives you the context of his 'form'. This is even expressly acknowledged - "you mock my moustache, but you do not know why I grew it". Obviously referring to both the physical AND emotional scars War and life have dealt him.

In retrospect, (because I wasn't around in 1943), I find it a bit odd Churchill hated it. For me, the film is actually largely pro-British. It acknowledges certain significant failings, but it also takes a serious swipe at the prevailing liberal characterisation of bluff old servicemen as dinosaurs.

It actually says "yes, these people may appear silly, but they were the products and the guardians of a sense of chivalry and a reference to something approaching rules and conduct, even in the most brutal of times. And their demise is NOT wholly a cause for celebration".

I think it's a profound piece of film making. And one that as you say, correctly concluded that the new world would hardly ever again reference "the national sporting club rules" etc.[/quote]

I've read that Churchill objected to the Colonel Blimp stereotype about British army officers, finding it disrespectful. If he really tried to stop the production, he can't have seen the movie beforehand, so he might have been under the impression that the movie would be in line with the cartoon character.


Mon Jan 06, 2014 9:02 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Possibly. Or perhaps he just wanted all film-funds going into propaganda.

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Mon Jan 06, 2014 9:06 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
NotHughGrant wrote:
Gedmud wrote:
300 *** (Rewatch)

I re-watched this today, reluctantly. I was 13 when this came out and I really didn't like it at the time. To my surprise I liked it a lot more today at 20 years of age. I guess I always thought it was one of those movies that would get dumber and dumber as you get older, but I was pretty damn entertained. The ending packed a heavier punch this time and the stylized fights were cooler than I remember. I dunno, maybe I was just in the mood.



A perfectly serviceable film if you beforehand accept the basic premise that it is utter bollocks.


Agreed. Particularly important to remember that the movie is told from the perspective of a Spartan soldier trying to drum up morale for the other troops -- it's supposed to be a tall tale, not history


The premise is valid to tell an exaggerated story, but that doesn't excuse Snyder's heavy reliance on voiceover and slo-mo. Sure, a Spartan soldier is relaying the story to a group of people, but when the voiceover is literally saying exactly what's happening onscreen as it happens, it becomes laughable. Building that into the film doesn't excuse poor filmmaking, and that's basic filmmaking 101 stuff. It's amateurish.

The slo-mo was used so much it became boring by the end of the film. It's shit, through and through.


Mon Jan 06, 2014 10:53 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
300 is absolutely hysterical. It works purely on the level of a parody of homoerotic beefcake action movies, even if it isn't intended as such. It's this generation's Top Gun.

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Mon Jan 06, 2014 11:31 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The voiceover itself is hilarious.

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Mon Jan 06, 2014 11:55 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Part 2 of my festive season movie watching schedule:

Monsters University (2013)
This prequel to Pixar's excellent 'Monsters, Inc.' (2001) tells the story of one-eyed green monster Mike Wazowski joining Monsters University to become a Scarer and meeting his future friend, the fluffy blue moster Sully, in the process. Its appeal isn't quite as universal as that of 'Monsters Inc.', because it requires at least a basic idea of how the American university system and student fraternies work, whereas 'Monsters Inc.' showed the same characters as blue collar workers, which should be more relatable to a wider audience. That's not a big criticism however and though I may not have gotten all of the in-jokes and references, there's plenty enough to like about 'Monster University'. I particularly applaud the filmmakers for the ending.
[Reveal] Spoiler:
Mike and Sully break University rules and, consequently, are facing expulson from MU. In order to prove to themselves that they have what it takes to become a Scarer, they illicitly enter the human world to scare some children, find themselves in a tricky situation and get out of it by managing the unheard-of feature of scaring adults. In a lesser movie, this triumph would have gotten them back into the Scarer program, cue happy ending. In 'Monsters University', they are still expelled from MU. In the closing montage, Mike and Sully are shown to take on a number of menial jobs at Monsters Inc., working their way up to become scarers the hard way.

7/10

Gambit (2012)
Harry Dean (Colin Firth) is an art curator in the employ of mega-rich douchebag Lionel Shahbandar (Alan Rickman), who humiliates Dean on a regular basis. (That's what we are told in voiceover; Shahbandar doesn't actually come across as tha bad in the movie.) Dean tries to get revenge by conning Shahbandar into purchasing a fake Monet painting, but requires the assistance of unpredictable Texan rodeo girl PJ Pudnowski (Cameron Diaz).
This comedy caper movie doesn't only feature a stellar cast, but was written by Joel and Ethan Coen, no less. It goes for a lighthearted vibe in the spirit of 60ies movies like 'Charade' or the Pink Panther series, starting with the Henri Mancini-esque score and an (interminable) animated opening sequence. So, in the light of all the talent involved, it should have been rather delightful. What it is is proof that you shouldn't expect a good movie just because the people involved have done excellent work in other movies. Based on his performance in this movie, Colin Firth doesn't have what it takes to be a comedian. Cameron Diaz's does, but her "Yee-Haw, Aaah'm from Texas" shtick is extremely annoying. Alan Rickman's role is tailor-made for him, but he doesn't make much of an impression. And the script is absolutely terrible. The Coens seem to regard it as hilariously funny that Cameron Diaz's character is running up high hotel bills by using the room service, while Firth's broke character has to pay for it. Comedy gold, no? This movie is so bad that I want to believe that the Coens cashed in on a movie script, which they wrote in a sugar rush when they were thirteen. Simply rubbish and not in the least funny. 3/10

Byzantium (2013)
Clara (Gemma Arterton) and her daughter Eleanor (Saoirse Ronan) are living on the edge. Not only does Clara have to work as a stripper to make ends meet, but they are also vampires on the run from the all-male fraternity of bloodsuckers. Clara and Eleanor take refuge in a seedy guesthouse in a run-down Irish (or British) coastal resort, which Clara turns into a profitable brothel, while Eleanor desires to share her story with somebody else. Not a good idea.
Yet another vampire movie, but this time its actually a good one. Director Neil Jordan, who has experience with this genre ('Interview with a Vampire') has a keen eye for visuals. I think I've made rather derogatory remarks about Gemma Arterton's acting abilities in the past, but she is very good as a single mother on the poverty line, who will do anything to keep her daughter safe. (Her acting in 'Prince of Persia' and 'Hänsel & Gretel: Witch Hunters' really stank, though.) And that's what the movie really is about: A fraught mother-daughter relationship. The whole vampire stuff is done rather well, too, and manages to be somewhat original: There are no fangs, the vampires can walk in daylight and people don't turn into vampires by being bitten, but by confronting an ancient spirit of sorts on an isolated island. In tone, 'Byzantium' reminded me of Tony Scott's debut feature 'The Hunger', which I also like (against better judgement, I should add).Like 'The Hunger', this movie is a bit too slow at times, but other than that, 'Byzantium' is pretty good. 7/10

Pain & Gain (2013)
Three dim-witted bodybuilders, Lugo (Mark Wahlberg), born-again Christian cokehead Doyle (Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson) and Adrian (Anthony Mackie), who has become impotent as a result of use of steroids, want to make the American Dream come true by hard work, which they interpret as kidnapping a rich person (Tony Shalhoub) and having him transfer all his possessions to them. Of course, everything goes terribly wrong.
My problem with director Michael Bay isn't his glossy, overdone visual style, but his "Phoar, look at that" sensibility. He is as unsubtle a filmmaker as they come, the cinematic equivalent of always ordering supersized meals in a fast food joint. If there's a good-looking woman in the movie, he'll shoot her so her breasts and bum are the most prominent features. If there's a car crash, it will involve the greatest possible number of cars, all of which will explode spectacularly. So I was mightily surprised that his style of filmmaking actually suited this particular material. The plot of 'Pain & Gain' is based on a true crime story, which is so unbelievable that you couldn't make it up. The movie is in bad taste, but it doesn't celebrate its distastefuless, it actually mines it for dark comedy. Further, it even has a slight satirical edge, lampooning not just the stupidity of its characters, but the idea that everybody can make his or her dream come true. There's still the problem of the over the top visual style and the movie goes too far in places, but 'Pain & Gain' is quite entertaining ad Michael Bay's best movie (as far as I've seen). Above average 6/10


Mon Jan 06, 2014 11:57 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Ken wrote:
300 is absolutely hysterical. It works purely on the level of a parody of homoerotic beefcake action movies, even if it isn't intended as such. It's this generation's Top Gun.


I like that analysis. Particularly the Top Gun part.

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Mon Jan 06, 2014 1:52 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Ken wrote:
300 is absolutely hysterical. It works purely on the level of a parody of homoerotic beefcake action movies, even if it isn't intended as such. It's this generation's Top Gun.


Amen. In every scene, it's like they cut away just before the main characters kiss.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Ken wrote:
300 is absolutely hysterical. It works purely on the level of a parody of homoerotic beefcake action movies, even if it isn't intended as such. It's this generation's Top Gun.


I get what you're saying, and far be it for me to try to take the fun out of a so-bad-it's-good movie, but I've always disliked the term unintentional parody (or the concept since you didn't use the exact term). Something can't be a parody if it isn't intended to be one. That's...not what a parody is. It needs to have some kind of self-awareness, otherwise it's just an example of a really bad whatever it is you're talking about.

300 and Top Gun are terrible beefcake action movies, not parodies of them. I'm not saying you shouldn't watch them, laugh at their awfulness, and enjoy the experience, but qualifying them as parodies gives them an air of legitmacy they don't deserve.


Mon Jan 06, 2014 3:39 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Unintentional parody has value in that it states something about the quality of the movie--that, if we did not know better, the movie would appear to us as a parody.

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Mon Jan 06, 2014 3:41 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
300 never felt like a parody to me, intentional or not, though it does have some funny scenes. 300 actually works on a serious level for me. I feel some genuine sadness when the narrator meets up with the queen. Some real emotion there. It also offers some great visuals. Can't say I find much to like in top gun by contrast, emotionally, visually, or otherwise.

I've toyed with the idea of Man of Steel being part parody. But I think snyders method of hyperbole has a purpose that isn't humor.


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