Discussion of movies and ReelThoughts topics

It is currently Wed Jul 23, 2014 11:24 am




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15683 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 686, 687, 688, 689, 690, 691, 692 ... 785  Next
Last Movie You Watched 
Author Message
Online
Critic
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:35 am
Posts: 7263
Location: Easton, MD
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Balaji Sivaraman wrote:

Most of us might know Mads Mikkelsen as a weak James Bond villain

Some of us actually know him as a terrific Bond villain :)

_________________
I'm lithe and fierce as a tiger


Mon Dec 16, 2013 11:12 pm
Profile
Online
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 10:42 pm
Posts: 1318
Location: Bangkok
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
And as a Hannibal Lecture almost worthy of Anthony Hopkins :) .

Blue is the Warmest Color (2013)

This could have turned out as a normal coming-of-age story. But the devil's in the details. The unwavering focus of the camera that always captures Adele at close inches. The three-hour insistence on letting every life minutia played out. And of course Adèle Exarchopoulos' superlative performance that hides nothing herself. All these three combine to create an intimate, almost epic-like drama; we see, feel, and hurt along with Adele. It's a movie that will stay with you. 9/10

Dunno yet if she takes over Juliette Binoche as my favorite female performance this year, but it's very close.

One scene in particular strikes me of how good Kechiche's direction is; the oft-mentioned "several years later" scene:

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Most directors, I think, would be tempted to pull off a bit right there when they almost fucked in public. But it stayed and stayed. We wondered just briefly if there are other people there and how they would react, but then the intimacy and intensity of the reunion made us caught up in the event with them and forgot about everything else. Only after Emma walked out of the restaurant that the camera moved back and showed another couple sitting not far away, looking, and we realized their presence mostly at the same time as Adele. It's a combination of her feeling shame for doing that to Emma and for realizing it was public, and her shame is our shame too, shared by total audience identification. Loved that stuff.


Mon Dec 16, 2013 11:42 pm
Profile
Second Unit Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 10:51 pm
Posts: 419
Location: Durham, NC
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Balaji Sivaraman wrote:
Jagten (The Hunt) (2013) - 3.5 out of 4

Lucas (Mads Mikkelsen) is a loving and playful kindergarten teacher who lives a lonely life while battling his ex-wife for the custody of his son. Until a seemingly innocent lie from a seemingly innocent 6-year old girl in his school lands him in a world of pain. That this girl happens to be his best friend's daughter doesn't help in alleviating things. This was an extremely gripping drama from beginning to end. I was so often at the edge of my seat that I almost want to brand it as a part-thriller.

It asked a number of difficult questions without providing any real answers. As one of the characters in the film says, "It is always assumed that children tell the truth. Unfortunately, they often do." There's also the uncomfortable question of how quickly children's minds latch onto things they see, and how wildly their imagination can run free. The whole controversy begins when the young child in question is shown something she shouldn't have been. It also poses the difficult question of how as a society we are too quick to brand someone guilty in uncomfortable cases without due diligence and without even giving him the chance to defend himself.

Most of us might know Mads Mikkelsen as a weak James Bond villain, but his work here is pretty great. The ending can be considered as being slightly open-ended, though it did close a lot of the main plot threads that came before. For my money, this is one to watch out for in my year-end list.


My #1 film of the year. Just fucking terrific.

Also, good to see you back on the forum Balaji!

_________________
"I have now come to claim that satisfaction."


Tue Dec 17, 2013 12:12 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2383
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
Balaji Sivaraman wrote:

Most of us might know Mads Mikkelsen as a weak James Bond villain

Some of us actually know him as a terrific Bond villain :)


Yeah, he was excellent.

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Tue Dec 17, 2013 5:13 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2383
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Tron Legacy (2010)

I actually enjoyed this. The Direction (although obviously overloaded with CGI by definition) was smooth and tasteful, the score quite impressive - and it has the obvious advantage of Olivier Wilde's Goddess like features (she is off the damn chain).

Not a bona fide great movie, but a perfectly adequate genre flick, and for such a contrived plot, I found it rather relaxing to watch.

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Tue Dec 17, 2013 5:26 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 6:26 pm
Posts: 2157
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I rewatched part of Casino Royale on cable recently. (Gotta love the holidays for those 007 marathons...) Maybe Le Chiffre wasn't the most flamboyant or megalomaniacal of Bond villains, but he was exactly the villain that the film required, and Mikkelsen acquitted himself well in the role. He was a grimy little weasel with just enough of a "red right hand" gimmick to distinguish him.

_________________
The temptation is to like what you should like--not what you do like... another temptation is to come up with an interesting reason for liking it that may not actually be the reason you like it.


Tue Dec 17, 2013 5:28 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2383
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Ken wrote:
I rewatched part of Casino Royale on cable recently. (Gotta love the holidays for those 007 marathons...) Maybe Le Chiffre wasn't the most flamboyant or megalomaniacal of Bond villains, but he was exactly the villain that the film required, and Mikkelsen acquitted himself well in the role. He was a grimy little weasel with just enough of a "red right hand" gimmick to distinguish him.


With it being a reboot, it was important for it to be about Bond. And I think Le Chiffre was exactly the right tone. And the actor nailed it perfectly.

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Tue Dec 17, 2013 5:31 am
Profile
Online
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 10:42 pm
Posts: 1318
Location: Bangkok
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Captain Phillips (2013)

An incredibly tense and well-acted thriller. Hanks in the last act is some of the best acting he has ever done. It's important that the event doesn't feel like a triumph (or at least not wholly), and Hanks' affecting performance goes a long way into selling that. 8.5/10

The Hunt (2013)

I have preconceived notion about this Danish film based on its subject matter and general storyline (an innocent teacher accused of sexually abusing a kid), so I was pleasantly surprised to find out that although things escalated, they did so realistically and not right into a miserablist drama. It is still upsetting, but the film takes pain to set up the central situation and convey the consequence convincingly, without rushing or piling on the protagonist unrelentingly as I'd feared. It was still a little heavy-handed in places than I'd have liked (Apart from two or three characters like the girls' parents, the other side are mostly comprised of rather one note hillbillies. Also the ending). But the any flaw is smoothed over by Mads Mikkelsen, who elevated the film a lot with how brilliantly he carries his pain and betrayal throughout the film. Between this and Hannibal, he has had a pretty great recent run. 9/10


Tue Dec 17, 2013 8:10 am
Profile
Second Unit Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2011 4:22 am
Posts: 413
Location: Chennai, India
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Woah, woah! Hold on there guys, I should probably clarify what I meant by "weak" Bond villain. :) I felt that the role of Le Chiffre was itself a bit weak as far as Bond villains I've seen goes. Mikkelsen was pretty good in the part, but the role let him down for me. I felt he never posed a significant threat to Bond. But the role of weakest Bond villain I've seen would go to Mathieu Amalric (again terrific actor in his own right let down by the role) in QoS.

And many thanks to Mr. Burns. I didn't realize how much I missed watching movies and talking about them until I started doing it again. Definitely feels great to be back in the thick of things.

_________________
Balajithots - Last Updated 21-Jan - Frozen (2013)
This list... is an absolute good. The list is life. All around its margins lies the gulf.


Tue Dec 17, 2013 9:36 am
Profile WWW
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2383
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Like I hinted at above, an OTT villain would have diminished the rebooted bad-ass bond.

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Tue Dec 17, 2013 12:07 pm
Profile
Cinematographer
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 2:41 pm
Posts: 639
Location: The Desert
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Between a quick trip to California and my first week of work, I've fallen a little behind. These are from the first week of December:

Upside Down - At long last, a film comes around that seeks to answer the big question on everyone’s mind: is love stronger than gravity? Well, maybe that’s not a question that’s been on everyone’s mind. Actually, it’s probably not a question on anyone’s mind. Which might partially explain why this ambitious film from director Juan Solanas, a love story between two people living on opposing planets floating side by side in space, hasn’t found an accepting audience, both critically and commercially. The two planets in the film are distinguished mainly by class; Adam (Jim Sturgess) lives among the lower class on one, while Eden (Kirsten Dunst) lives among the upper class on the other. In their childhood, they were able to meet on the very tops of mountains, but a tragic incident tore them apart. Many years later, Adam catches a glimpse of Eden on television, and devises an elaborate plan to reconnect with her. To do this, however, he will have to take a job at a sinister corporation, whose headquarters serves as a literal bridge between the two planets.

In order to appreciate the more positive qualities that Upside Down has to offer, you definitely need to be in a specific mindset, one that can tolerate a healthy dose of saccharine and an onslaught of scientific/logical rule-bending. On occasion I have been able to settle into that kind of mindset, and for a decent portion of this film I was willing to go along for the ride. Sure, a part of my brain signals how incredibly ridiculous it is that all the main protagonist needs to do to walk upside down convincingly is strap on some anti-gravity matter and gel his hair down, but it’s all in good fun. It’s easy to get lost just in the visuals too; regardless of the film’s problems, and there are undoubtedly many, the world that Solanas creates is an incredibly impressive one. So much so that it’s a little heartbreaking when the shortcomings take center stage and never leave. The lack of any real villainous presence prevents the film from ever generating much tension, and that lack of conflict leads to an ending that could almost be the definition of anticlimax. The underwhelming finale, to put it simply, just dampens the good cheer, and I can’t help but bemoan the fact that the filmmakers had this goofy but incredibly promising concept to play with, and all they could come up with was an unremarkable romance filled with contrivances and easy exits from more challenging directions. 4/10.

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire - Looking back on 2013, I have many reasons to be thankful as a lover of film, but the year’s big blockbuster offerings are not among those reasons. My feeling with these tent pole releases has always been that there needs to be a careful balance between smarts and spectacle, and in this respect, 2013 has been something of a down year. Strong examples certainly exist that place more value in one over the other and vice versa, but I don’t think we’ve been given the best efforts from the major studios in that regard either. There were the films that provided big, dumb spectacle without offering much of anything else (Pacific Rim) and there were the films that took themselves so seriously they left little opportunity for any sense of exhilaration and fun (Man Of Steel). Out of all the blockbusters released this year, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire feels like the only one that really gets the balance right. It gives its universe the thematic weight it deserves, while also providing its fair share of legitimate thrills and pulse-pounding action.

Plotwise, Catching Fire hits many of the same beats as the previous film, but the difference is in the details. With that first film, the focus was mainly on the dilemmas of Jennifer Lawrence’s Katniss, and her resolve to overcome the obstacles placed in front of her. The intricacies of the world she inhabited were never much more than window dressing. With this film, however, the focus moves away from her slightly and more to fleshing out the operations of the dystopian society. We witness more of the backstage politics, which leads to more oppression, and more brutality. There are more dynamic and relatable games competitors, instead of faceless adversaries. The extravagant, almost Dr. Seuss-esque style choices of the upper class citizens, which I wasn’t quite sure what to make of in the first film, resonant more strongly because of the sharp contrast to the plain-clothed citizens on the outskirts. This expansion of the world emphasizes that this isn’t a story just about Katniss anymore. When her final decisive action comes along, it carries with it a great impact not just for her but for the entire world around her. Which is about as enticing a setup for a finale as you can have. Even though the concept of two films devoted to one book never sounds like a necessary decision, the conclusion to this film makes me think this series has earned the right to finish telling its tale without feeling pressured by overbearing time constrictions. 8/10.

New Tale Of Zatoichi - The third entry in the Zatoichi series, a series that so far has been much more calm and contemplative than I was anticipating. Released in 1963, the film opens with the famed blind swordsman in a remorseful mood. Years of aimless wandering and killing have clearly taken a great toll, and he finally seems ready to settle down and start his life over as a new type of man. The opportunity presents itself when he returns to his hometown, where he reunites with his former sensei Banno. The sensei has fallen on hard times, and is devising a morally-suspect plan to acquire some extra funds. He also has plans to marry off his young sister, but she is not keen on the idea of an arranged marriage. Instead, she has eyes for Zatoichi, and he for her, but there is a good chance the sensei will not approve of their romantic plans. Unlike the previous entry in the series, New Tale Of Zatoichi stands mostly on its own. Only one thread from the previous film remains, in the form of a man seeking revenge against the blind swordsman for the slaying of his brother. However, the inevitable confrontation between the two does not play out in a conventional manner.

This is the first Zatoichi film to trade black-and-white for color, but the extra palette does little to brighten the mood. It’s a story about men struggling in vain to come to terms with the violent lives they have chosen for themselves, and consequently, most of the action here has a desperate quality, with every swing of the blade tinged with regret. The big climactic swordfight at the end barely raises a pulse, because the tone of it is more anguishing than exciting. A great contrast emerges between Banno, the respected but soulless sensei, and Zatoichi, the handicapped but dignified drifter. The former resorts to using his violent skills for duplicitous means, while the latter uses his violent skills to do the right thing, sacrificing his chance at happiness and instead gaining something approaching nobility. With twenty-two films still left to see from the series’ original theatrical run, I’m assuming all this melancholy will eventually be replaced by a more carefree style. But I appreciate how these early entries, and especially this one, emphasize the more downbeat qualities of its central hero. 8/10.

_________________
"The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool."
Letterboxd Profile


Wed Dec 18, 2013 11:19 pm
Profile WWW
Assistant Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2012 2:42 pm
Posts: 779
Location: New Zealand
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Ghost Shark (2013)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2600742/
You know sometimes after a shitty day, you just want to watch something super low-brow. Some throw away entertainment that requires nothing more than the brain's pilot light to be on. A few weeks ago I saw Sharknado, which was absolutely god-awful, but in a surprisingly entertaining way. So a film titled "Ghost Shark" should be expected to be in a similar sort of vein, right?... A redneck couple mortally injure a shark and it swims into a some sort of sacred cave and it comes back to life as Ghost Shark! Ghost Shark can manifest in any water, even like a puddle, a tap, a cup, or rain. How could that be possibly be bad? Well, I have seen all three Feast movies this year, plus a half a dozen Uwe Boll films and the perhaps the bottom of the cinematic barrel with Stupid, Crazy, Love, which I simply despised. Well, I have now seen Ghost Shark, and we have a new low point. Maybe if the actors just had some fun, or it was tongue in cheek, or the effects were at least okish, or the dialogue fresh, or something. Anything really.
2/10.


Thu Dec 19, 2013 3:40 am
Profile
Auteur
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 12:02 pm
Posts: 3353
Location: Zion, IL
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
Ghost Shark (2013)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2600742/
You know sometimes after a shitty day, you just want to watch something super low-brow. Some throw away entertainment that requires nothing more than the brain's pilot light to be on. A few weeks ago I saw Sharknado, which was absolutely god-awful, but in a surprisingly entertaining way. So a film titled "Ghost Shark" should be expected to be in a similar sort of vein, right?... A redneck couple mortally injure a shark and it swims into a some sort of sacred cave and it comes back to life as Ghost Shark! Ghost Shark can manifest in any water, even like a puddle, a tap, a cup, or rain. How could that be possibly be bad? Well, I have seen all three Feast movies this year, plus a half a dozen Uwe Boll films and the perhaps the bottom of the cinematic barrel with Stupid, Crazy, Love, which I simply despised. Well, I have now seen Ghost Shark, and we have a new low point. Maybe if the actors just had some fun, or it was tongue in cheek, or the effects were at least okish, or the dialogue fresh, or something. Anything really.
2/10.

You want to go even lower? Try Dark Heaven, I can gurantee you won't see a worse film then that one.

BTW this film sounds pretty cool, i'll be sure to check it out.


Thu Dec 19, 2013 4:11 am
Profile
Second Unit Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 16, 2011 4:22 am
Posts: 413
Location: Chennai, India
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Le Passe (The Past) (2013) - 3.5 out of 4

What is it about Farhadi's style that makes each of his films such a compelling watch? I cannot place my finger on it, or maybe I am simply not informed enough on those aspects of filmmaking. The moment the titles end and the film begins rolling, I am completely hooked, and it is only when the end credits begin to roll that I come back to reality. This was the case with A Separation which is quite simply a masterpiece, and it was the case again with The Past, a piece of masterful filmmaking in its own right, though not quite as good as the former.

The Past can almost be considered a quasi-sequel to A Separation. It addresses almost all of the same themes: a couple undergoing divorce, the effect breaking down a relationship has on children, how adults make decisions without giving a lot of thought to the effect it has on their children and so on. And just like that film, there are no inherently bad characters in this one as well. Farhadi simply puts real people in real situations and builds drama with that setup. In fact, the biggest negative I can conjure up against The Past is that it is almost "too similar" to his 2011 film. The similarities don't just end with the themes; just like that film, there's a mystery element at play here as well. It unfolds slowly and surely, but by the time the final part of the film begins, it becomes key to the proceedings. Although it wasn't quite déjà vu, it was close.

But really none of that matters because as I mentioned in the first para, this is still superior to what we watch often. The story is simple: Ahmad (Ali Mosaffa) comes back to France to finalize divorce with his ex-wife Marie (Berenice Bejo). The latter is in a relationship with Samir (Tahar Rahim). Ahmad unknowingly gets caught in the middle of a complicated situation involving him, his ex-wife, her new boyfriend, and not to mention, the children. Berenice Bejo won the Best Actress at Cannes for this film, and it is certainly a great performance. She was the only recognizable actor in the film for me. As for the rest of the cast, Farhadi's casting shines through once again, especially in the case of child actors. The kid who plays Samir's son is especially terrific in a handful of scenes. Pauline Burlet who plays Lucie, Marie's eldest daughter from a previous marriage, and who disapproves of her mother's relationship with Samir, was also terrific. Her role and performance reminded me of Shailene Woodley from The Descendants. As was the case with A Separation, every actor inhabits their characters, so much so that we lose sight of the fact that we're watching a film.

The ending isn't quite as open-ended as A Separation and didn't quite have the same effect on me, but it was great in its own right. If you think I've gone overboard with the A Separation comparisons, it is only because the film itself wears these similarities on its sleeves. Ignoring that, The Past is one of the best films of the year and will surely make its way to my year-end lists in one form or the other.

La grande bellezza (The Great Beauty) (2013) - 3 out of 4 (Most definitely subject to change on multiple viewings.)

I had one of those moments James mentions in this thread about the worst part of being a cinephile when watching this film: "When you're watching some acknowledged, acclaimed masterpiece and you have the sinking, guilty feeling that you have no idea what everyone finds special about the film". I wouldn't quite say I thought the film wasn't special, because I certainly did, but I had difficulty putting all the pieces together. It was one of those artsy films that requires a second or third viewing for me to fully sink in. Of course, it didn't help that I was sick when I saw this film yesterday, but couldn't help it because I knew this film was beautifully shot and needed to be seen in the big-screen.

On the first time, a few things stuck with me: 1) The cinematography is splendid and captures Rome in all her beauty. The film should be a theatrical viewing for that alone. 2) The conversations are eminently watchable. Discussions on art, theater, literature and other topics are a joy to listen to. 3) The music is wonderful and subtle and will surely make its way to my year-end nominations for Best Background score. 4) The humor is subtle and unforced, and there are lots of laugh out loud moments that had the audience here clapping and cheering. 5) Toni Servillo's performance provided one of the great joys of movie-watching this year for me. His wry humor, the way he delivered those monologues, and the way he depicted the sadness of his life with his face was great to watch. There was one monologue which was especially awesome. It was a scathing indictment of a fellow author for all the so-called sacrifices she has made in her life. He could almost be talking of a lot of similar high-society individuals in general. That was arguably the best moment of the film.

As I said earlier, I am not quite sure how everything comes together though, but this is definitely a must-watch for 2013, if only for the striking presentation.

_________________
Balajithots - Last Updated 21-Jan - Frozen (2013)
This list... is an absolute good. The list is life. All around its margins lies the gulf.


Thu Dec 19, 2013 4:49 am
Profile WWW
Assistant Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2012 2:42 pm
Posts: 779
Location: New Zealand
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Vexer wrote:
You want to go even lower? Try Dark Heaven, I can gurantee you won't see a worse film then that one.
BTW this film sounds pretty cool, i'll be sure to check it out.

Well Dark Heaven does rate 0.3 points lower than Ghost Shark on imdb (3.2 vs 3.5/10), so the consensus is indeed that it is even worse, ha ha ha. I'll be sure to NOT see that then, ever.
Combining Ghost Shark and "pretty cool" is contradictory, you'll see. This was a bad film. Actually not just bad, but very, very bad. I would have given it a 1/10 if it had been a musical. That is seriously the only way this thing could have been made even worse.


Thu Dec 19, 2013 8:32 pm
Profile
Auteur
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 12:02 pm
Posts: 3353
Location: Zion, IL
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
Vexer wrote:
You want to go even lower? Try Dark Heaven, I can gurantee you won't see a worse film then that one.
BTW this film sounds pretty cool, i'll be sure to check it out.

Well Dark Heaven does rate 0.3 points lower than Ghost Shark on imdb (3.2 vs 3.5/10), so the consensus is indeed that it is even worse, ha ha ha. I'll be sure to NOT see that then, ever.
Combining Ghost Shark and "pretty cool" is contradictory, you'll see. This was a bad film. Actually not just bad, but very, very bad. I would have given it a 1/10 if it had been a musical. That is seriously the only way this thing could have been made even worse.

You saying it's bad only makes me want to see it even more ;)


Thu Dec 19, 2013 8:54 pm
Profile
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jun 20, 2010 4:04 pm
Posts: 1662
Location: New Hampshire
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
Ghost Shark (2013)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2600742/
You know sometimes after a shitty day, you just want to watch something super low-brow. Some throw away entertainment that requires nothing more than the brain's pilot light to be on. A few weeks ago I saw Sharknado, which was absolutely god-awful, but in a surprisingly entertaining way. So a film titled "Ghost Shark" should be expected to be in a similar sort of vein, right?... A redneck couple mortally injure a shark and it swims into a some sort of sacred cave and it comes back to life as Ghost Shark! Ghost Shark can manifest in any water, even like a puddle, a tap, a cup, or rain. How could that be possibly be bad? Well, I have seen all three Feast movies this year, plus a half a dozen Uwe Boll films and the perhaps the bottom of the cinematic barrel with Stupid, Crazy, Love, which I simply despised. Well, I have now seen Ghost Shark, and we have a new low point. Maybe if the actors just had some fun, or it was tongue in cheek, or the effects were at least okish, or the dialogue fresh, or something. Anything really.
2/10.


This could be good-bad. I would have to see it myself to be sure. I'm a huge fan of good-bad films. See Earth Vs. The Flying Saucers a few posts back.

_________________
Death is pretty final
I'm collecting vinyl
I'm gonna DJ at the end of the world.


Thu Dec 19, 2013 11:37 pm
Profile
Online
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 10:42 pm
Posts: 1318
Location: Bangkok
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Jeeze, Huckabees... I don't quite share all of Vexer's hatred, but now I understand it completely.


Fri Dec 20, 2013 12:25 am
Profile
Auteur
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 12:02 pm
Posts: 3353
Location: Zion, IL
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
peng wrote:
Jeeze, Huckabees... I don't quite share all of Vexer's hatred, but now I understand it completely.

Glad you can see my perspective.


Fri Dec 20, 2013 1:51 am
Profile
Assistant Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2012 2:42 pm
Posts: 779
Location: New Zealand
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Sexual Chocolate wrote:
This could be good-bad. I would have to see it myself to be sure. I'm a huge fan of good-bad films. See Earth Vs. The Flying Saucers a few posts back.

No. Sharknado could be described as "good-bad". Believe me when I say Ghost Shark is bad-bad. Don't say i didn't warn you!


Fri Dec 20, 2013 1:56 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15683 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 686, 687, 688, 689, 690, 691, 692 ... 785  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Exabot [Bot], MunichMan, peng and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forum/DivisionCore.
Translated by Xaphos © 2007, 2008, 2009 phpBB.fr