Discussion of movies and ReelThoughts topics

It is currently Thu Jul 31, 2014 12:52 pm




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15725 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 667, 668, 669, 670, 671, 672, 673 ... 787  Next
Last Movie You Watched 
Author Message
Second Unit Director

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 1:45 pm
Posts: 391
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
Unke wrote:
If … (1968)
...
This is a very blunt, but honest and angry critique of the establishment and must have seemed incendiary and provocative in the year of student revolts in France, Germany and the U.S. ‘If…’ borrows many techniques from French Nouvelle Vague directors, which must have been cutting edge in the late 60ies. 45 years after its release, many aspects of ‘If…’ are not topical anymore, though, and the style is too arty without purpose. The movie is still worth watching for McDowell’s performance alone and I would much prefer it to other movies with a similar set-up, such as ‘Dead Poets’ Society’ etc. 7/10


If is dated. No doubt. But in this rare case, I think that's a bad thing. Rarely -- if ever -- has a movie more captured the spirit of its time than If... did/does. If IS the 1960s. Many movies demand change, but If... is an actual call to arms, a call to anarchy. It made me want to go out and start a revolution. And the film's style suits its substance. What you perceive as artiness I perceive as an anarchic "fuck you" to established filmmaking conventions. And I love the movie for it. I think it's a **** film


I'm glad that you like 'If...' that much, but I think it that it rails against issues which have large been resolved or made obsolent. I'm wondering,
[Reveal] Spoiler:
do you think that the image of pupils shooting at figures of authority at a school has different connotations now? In today's context, it seems somewhat inappropriate.


Wed Nov 06, 2013 1:12 pm
Profile
Critic
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:35 am
Posts: 7280
Location: Easton, MD
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Unke wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
Unke wrote:
If … (1968)
...
This is a very blunt, but honest and angry critique of the establishment and must have seemed incendiary and provocative in the year of student revolts in France, Germany and the U.S. ‘If…’ borrows many techniques from French Nouvelle Vague directors, which must have been cutting edge in the late 60ies. 45 years after its release, many aspects of ‘If…’ are not topical anymore, though, and the style is too arty without purpose. The movie is still worth watching for McDowell’s performance alone and I would much prefer it to other movies with a similar set-up, such as ‘Dead Poets’ Society’ etc. 7/10


If is dated. No doubt. But in this rare case, I think that's a bad thing. Rarely -- if ever -- has a movie more captured the spirit of its time than If... did/does. If IS the 1960s. Many movies demand change, but If... is an actual call to arms, a call to anarchy. It made me want to go out and start a revolution. And the film's style suits its substance. What you perceive as artiness I perceive as an anarchic "fuck you" to established filmmaking conventions. And I love the movie for it. I think it's a **** film


I'm glad that you like 'If...' that much, but I think it that it rails against issues which have large been resolved or made obsolent. I'm wondering,
[Reveal] Spoiler:
do you think that the image of pupils shooting at figures of authority at a school has different connotations now? In today's context, it seems somewhat inappropriate.


I'm a teacher, but watching that scene doesn't make my blood run cold. In the context of the film, I'd be up on the roof with them

_________________
I'm lithe and fierce as a tiger


Wed Nov 06, 2013 1:44 pm
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 30, 2009 1:35 am
Posts: 2022
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Ordinary Decent Criminal: Michael Lynch (Kevin Spacey) is the leader of an Irish criminal gang who is more into being flamboyant rather getting rich, though he doesn't mind that. He is married to two sisters, Linda Fiorentino and Helen Baxendale, because nothing says Irish like Kevin Spacey and Linda Fiorentino. Much of the plot of this has to do with the heist of a Carvaggio painting that supposedly is worth 30 million Euros because this will make his name immortal for some reason. Along the way, it asks some interesting questions, such as why he can walk up to the counter to collect his dole while wearing a mask and nobody asks him for identification or summons the police (or in a courtroom, for that matter). We're supposed to root for him, but I was really hoping he'd get the book thrown at him. A really large and heavy book.

Pretty annoying movie that tries to be clever, marked by Spacey's memorably awful attempt at an Irish accent. I'm wondering if it might have been held back for release after American Beauty. (5 of 10)

_________________
Evil does not wear a bonnet!--Mr. Tinkles


Wed Nov 06, 2013 2:32 pm
Profile
Second Unit Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 10:51 pm
Posts: 419
Location: Durham, NC
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Valentine Road (TV) (2013) 3/4

HBO’s documentary series delivers an effective examination on gay culture and the traditional belief systems that facilitate prejudice and inequality. Valentine Road does a pretty solid job on presenting both sides of the argument and for that I was pleased. I wouldn’t say that this specific documentary does anything groundbreaking—nothing necessarily elevates its material beyond the 2.5/3 star ranges. Yet even with a slight slant (which is arguably unavoidable), its rare to see a documentary so adamant on giving the viewer impartial pieces of the story in order to present a clear picture of the events conveyed.


12 Years a Slave (2013) 4/4

Without question one of the most astounding, memorable cinematic experiences of my life. Steve McQueen has created a film that looks directly into the horror of slavery without flinching, and brings the audience face to with the brutalities of our own past. While McQueen’s previous effort Shame looked at obsession, addiction, and self-destruction, 12 Years a Slave assess the institution of slavery with a keen eye toward “rationalized” inhumanity and unjustified suffering. With 12 Years a Slave, I see McQueen as a reflective director who has tweaked his past issues of connectivity with the audience. There is no denying the cold, relentless style displayed throughout 12 Years a Slave (as many of you have already pointed out), however McQueen has chosen a source material that is relatable; McQueen gives us a man who is stripped of his freedom and much of his hope. What McQueen creates in 12 Years a Slave is a tone that matches visual imagery and underlying themes. A film that can show us the deepest physical and emotional facet of connectivity between two individuals completely void of meaning. I see a film that is not afraid to tackle an aspect of our history that many would like to forget, one that isn’t merely concentrated on pushing the viewer to have a syrupy-surface level emotional response, but a film that allows the emotional weight of our protagonist and his journey to slowly sink in and ruminate.

_________________
"I have now come to claim that satisfaction."


Wed Nov 06, 2013 3:48 pm
Profile
Critic
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:35 am
Posts: 7280
Location: Easton, MD
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JackBurns wrote:



12 Years a Slave (2013) 4/4

Without question one of the most astounding, memorable cinematic experiences of my life. Steve McQueen has created a film that looks directly into the horror of slavery without flinching, and brings the audience face to with the brutalities of our own past. While McQueen’s previous effort Shame looked at obsession, addiction, and self-destruction, 12 Years a Slave assess the institution of slavery with a keen eye toward “rationalized” inhumanity and unjustified suffering. With 12 Years a Slave, I see McQueen as a reflective director who has tweaked his past issues of connectivity with the audience. There is no denying the cold, relentless style displayed throughout 12 Years a Slave (as many of you have already pointed out), however McQueen has chosen a source material that is relatable; McQueen gives us a man who is stripped of his freedom and much of his hope. What McQueen creates in 12 Years a Slave is a tone that matches visual imagery and underlying themes. A film that can show us the deepest physical and emotional facet of connectivity between two individuals completely void of meaning. I see a film that is not afraid to tackle an aspect of our history that many would like to forget, one that isn’t merely concentrated on pushing the viewer to have a syrupy-surface level emotional response, but a film that allows the emotional weight of our protagonist and his journey to slowly sink in and ruminate.


Wish I saw it, man, wish I saw it.

_________________
I'm lithe and fierce as a tiger


Wed Nov 06, 2013 7:14 pm
Profile
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 10:42 pm
Posts: 1349
Location: Bangkok
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I don't think I have seen you giving out 10/10 before, Unke. Has anything else recently has gotten that?


Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:08 pm
Profile
Second Unit Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 10:51 pm
Posts: 419
Location: Durham, NC
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
JackBurns wrote:



12 Years a Slave (2013) 4/4

Without question one of the most astounding, memorable cinematic experiences of my life. Steve McQueen has created a film that looks directly into the horror of slavery without flinching, and brings the audience face to with the brutalities of our own past. While McQueen’s previous effort Shame looked at obsession, addiction, and self-destruction, 12 Years a Slave assess the institution of slavery with a keen eye toward “rationalized” inhumanity and unjustified suffering. With 12 Years a Slave, I see McQueen as a reflective director who has tweaked his past issues of connectivity with the audience. There is no denying the cold, relentless style displayed throughout 12 Years a Slave (as many of you have already pointed out), however McQueen has chosen a source material that is relatable; McQueen gives us a man who is stripped of his freedom and much of his hope. What McQueen creates in 12 Years a Slave is a tone that matches visual imagery and underlying themes. A film that can show us the deepest physical and emotional facet of connectivity between two individuals completely void of meaning. I see a film that is not afraid to tackle an aspect of our history that many would like to forget, one that isn’t merely concentrated on pushing the viewer to have a syrupy-surface level emotional response, but a film that allows the emotional weight of our protagonist and his journey to slowly sink in and ruminate.


Wish I saw it, man, wish I saw it.


It's ok dude. You liked Wake In Fright and Searching for Sugar Man, thats all that matters. :D

_________________
"I have now come to claim that satisfaction."


Thu Nov 07, 2013 1:47 am
Profile
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 10:42 pm
Posts: 1349
Location: Bangkok
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Thor: The Dark World (2013)

I miss Kenneth Branagh. Asgard turned from the colorful, vibrant Shakespeare setting of the first film into a drab, filtered town that will not be out of place as part of Game of Thrones' Westeros (even if I didn't know that Alan Taylor directed it, the similarities are very evident). The first part of the film almost put me to sleep with a lot of clumsy exposition. The film got its first kick of energy when Thor met up with Jane, and up another notch when Loki became part of the story. That made the second half significantly more enjoyable, and that carries on to the climax, which I thought is a very good blend of action and humor. Still, the feeling that all these various elements not quite gelling never leave. Overall I enjoyed it somewhat, but this is the worst effort from Marvel studio thus far. 6/10


Thu Nov 07, 2013 9:09 am
Profile
Critic
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:35 am
Posts: 7280
Location: Easton, MD
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
What's Up, Doc? (1972) ***

I'm not that big a fan of screwball comedies, unless they can somehow get beneath the absurdity and give me characters I care about. The Lady Eve is one such film. One of the few. What's Up Doc doesn't quite manage to fulfill this tall order, but it was very likable and pleasant throughout. Barbara Streisand was fairly delightful and Ryan O'Neal was decent as the square who falls in love with her. Ebert's review is pretty good, so I'll steal his point and say that it's nothing deep, but every so often that's fine too.

_________________
I'm lithe and fierce as a tiger


Thu Nov 07, 2013 3:19 pm
Profile
Second Unit Director

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 1:45 pm
Posts: 391
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
peng wrote:
I don't think I have seen you giving out 10/10 before, Unke. Has anything else recently has gotten that?


If you mean recent releases, 'Gravity' would be the first since 'The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowhisp on the Ring' or 'Mulholland Dr.' (both released in 2001). My ratings are meant to reflect how much I liked a film and 10/10 would be a personal favourite.


Thu Nov 07, 2013 5:10 pm
Profile
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jun 20, 2010 4:04 pm
Posts: 1667
Location: New Hampshire
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
To start off, I'd like to add that If... is one of my favorite films. I love its style; it's simply fantastic. As for the last movie I saw:

Memento

A critical and cult favorite, this is the film that announced that Chris Nolan was a director to be taken seriously. It is Rashomon-like in its structure and tone, and in some ways is equal to that Kurosawa classic. We know that a man is looking to take vengeance after his wife's murder, but everything else is a haze of confusion. Since the lead character (a stellar performance by Guy Pearce) has no short-term memory, it throws everything into question. Are the people who try to help him really trying to do so? What is his real identity? Was he even married? How much of this exists only in the reality he knows? I believe multiple people could watch this film and come away with entirely different conclusions. It is to Nolan's credit that Memento remains suspenseful throughout; this is a complex film, and there is much more to it than what is on the surface.

In short, Nolan would go on to make other worthwhile films, but to this day has not made anything this engaging and riveting in its complexity.

_________________
Death is pretty final
I'm collecting vinyl
I'm gonna DJ at the end of the world.


Thu Nov 07, 2013 11:04 pm
Profile
Cinematographer
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 2:41 pm
Posts: 639
Location: The Desert
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Finally wrapping up October:

Andrei Rublev - Andrei Tarkovsky’s highly-regarded 1966 epic had long been something of a cinematic white whale for me, a film I knew I needed to see but one that always seemed too daunting to attempt to overcome. The film has certainly built up a large reputation over the years, frequently appearing on lists of the greatest films ever made. But whether it was running length (205 minutes in the longest version) or just the thought of spending those 205 minutes in the hands of Tarkovsky who, while a brilliant filmmaker, does not have the most immediately approachable style, the prospect of giving the film my full time and attention had always been a little troublesome (the subpar condition of the 205-minute print used on the old Criterion DVD didn’t exactly help matters either; this is a film in dire need of a comprehensive restoration project). Now, after finally taking the time to watch Andrei Rublev in its entirety, I must admit to finding it a far more accessible film than I was expecting. Broken into seven episodes, along with a prologue and epilogue, the film follows the physical and spiritual voyage of the title character, a 15th century Russian icon painter desperately seeking divine inspiration for his work. Commissioned for a project to decorate the Cathedral of the Annunciation, Rublev embarks on a lengthy journey to Moscow, and on the way bears witnesses to the darkness in the world around him.

Looking for a sign from God that will grant him the means to continue his work, Rublev instead finds himself in the middle of a brutal Tartan raid, at the end of which he is forced to kill to protect another. Traumatized by this experience, he takes a vow of silence and ceases his work, which lasts for many years, until he finally witnesses something that allows him to regain his faith. To contextualize the film within Tarkovsky’s filmography, it is closer to the relatively straightforward storytelling of his debut Ivan’s Childhood than the more oblique constructions of later films like The Mirror and The Sacrifice. It’s also the first film of Tarkovsky’s to bring in a heavy spiritual component, which would come to define so much of his later work. Andrei Rublev is interested in the connection between art and spirituality, and how one man sees these two elements as inseparable from each other. In this examination of Rublev’s inner turmoil, the film is surprisingly intimate, but at the same time, the scope is incredibly epic. Much in the same vein as Frantisek Vlacil’s 1967 Czech epic Marketa Lazarova, Andrei Rublev focuses in on the early transitions from a godless to an enlightened era, and dramatizes the violent clashes that resulted from this transition. The film is sometimes unapologetic in its brutality, but the final episode and epilogue closes everything out with an affirmation of the possibility of a divine presence. It feels good to have finally taken the time to watch this film, and to be left at the end with a feeling that its lofty reputation is entirely justified. 10/10.

Drug War - Over the course of a year in new film releases, you can expect a fair share of disposable genre exercises, thrillers and comedies and horror films that are content to stay within their own preconceived boundaries. Most of these films come and go without much fanfare or consequence, but there are always one or two a year that take the traditional elements of their genre and expand on them in new and interesting ways. Johnnie To’s Drug War is one of those types of films, a brutal and efficient procedural thriller that offers up the requisite genre thrills while also subverting expectations and bringing along an extra layer of nuance and depth. To’s film opens by introducing a squad of drug enforcement officials, fresh off a major bust. Among the criminals captured is notorious meth manufacturer Timmy Choi (Louis Koo), who has inside knowledge on the members of a powerful drug ring. To bring down the bad guys, the crafty police captain Zhang Lei (Sun Honglei) offers Choi a deal. Desperate to avoid the death sentence that comes with being caught making a certain amount of illegal product, Choi agrees to help the police. The cop and the criminal form an uneasy alliance, but the true nature of this relationship will be constantly subverted through the rest of the film.

Lest you think this is one of those meta exercises that has a smug superiority over the genre in which it is operating, rest assured that Drug War remains true to certain traditions without ever coming across as self-aware. As far as its merits as a crime thriller go, the film contains some of the most memorable setpieces I’ve seen from the genre in many years. One tense operation that hinges on several identity bluffs will remind many viewers of a similar sequence in Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol, although here everything builds up to a memorably audacious final challenge. Another sequence sees the police force directing boat traffic on a dock in an attempt to fool watching drug lords. Elsewhere, two big shootouts recapture some of that old John Woo Hard Boiled energy. But To doesn’t settle with just providing terrific setpieces, and the final twenty minutes seriously shakes up the standard order of how these types of films usually play out, which caught me by surprise in a delightful way. Not to say the end of the film is delightful; in fact, it’s incredibly stark and, particularly in the final denouement, genuinely uncomfortable. While my first reaction to these concluding moments was that they didn’t quite gel with what came before, after some contemplation I came to the conclusion they give the film a good deal of extra punch that a more traditional genre film would not have been brave enough to attempt. For that willingness to stretch beyond genre norms, To gets a well-deserved tip of the cap. 8/10.

The Lords Of Salem - I may never be able to shake my primary mental image of Rob Zombie as the guy responsible for those irritating head-bangers I always hear at sporting events, but if he keeps making films in the same vein as The Lords Of Salem, that image may very well be replaced one day with one of a semi-competent horror director. Zombie’s newest film stars his wife Sheri Moon Zombie as radio personality and recovering drug addict Heidi Hawthorne. One day, she receives a vinyl record in the mail from a band called The Lords. The satanic noises that emanate from the grooves have a powerful, hypnotic effect on Heidi and the other women of the town of Salem, and that’s when things start to get more than a little weird. Who are The Lords, and why have they sent their record specifically to Heidi? What’s the deal with the ominous red glow coming from the apartment room down the hall? And speaking of apartments, why does Heidi’s complex seem oddly vacant, apart from a trio of ominous women who suddenly decide to take an active interest in Heidi’s life?

Nothing that I’ve previously gandered from Zombie’s earlier films has inspired me with much confidence to seek them out, which makes the classical approach he employs in The Lords Of Salem a real surprise. For the better part of the film’s first hour and a half, Zombie creates a genuinely creepy atmosphere with his $2.5 million production budget, getting the most out of his “Kubrickian” shot compositions and insidious ambient soundscape (although he does go a little overboard with the overexposure; there’s more lens flare here than in a J.J. Abrams film). The film has no problem with cribbing directly from its influences, Rosemary’s Baby in particular, but Zombie for most of the running length is able to ride on the right side on that line between silly and scary. He finally does cross over that line in the final climactic moments, when everything suddenly turns into a music video, with awkward video effects and ludicrously over-the-top satanic imagery. Silly conclusion notwithstanding, I found The Lords Of Salem something of a modest success. Not sure if it’s enough to get me to go back and assess his other films, but skepticism has now been replaced by mild optimism for Zombie’s future as a filmmaker. 6/10.

_________________
"The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool."
Letterboxd Profile


Thu Nov 07, 2013 11:11 pm
Profile WWW
Critic
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:35 am
Posts: 7280
Location: Easton, MD
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blonde Almond wrote:
Finally wrapping up October:

Andrei Rublev - Andrei Tarkovsky’s highly-regarded 1966 epic had long been something of a cinematic white whale for me, a film I knew I needed to see but one that always seemed too daunting to attempt to overcome. The film has certainly built up a large reputation over the years, frequently appearing on lists of the greatest films ever made. But whether it was running length (205 minutes in the longest version) or just the thought of spending those 205 minutes in the hands of Tarkovsky who, while a brilliant filmmaker, does not have the most immediately approachable style, the prospect of giving the film my full time and attention had always been a little troublesome (the subpar condition of the 205-minute print used on the old Criterion DVD didn’t exactly help matters either; this is a film in dire need of a comprehensive restoration project). Now, after finally taking the time to watch Andrei Rublev in its entirety, I must admit to finding it a far more accessible film than I was expecting. Broken into seven episodes, along with a prologue and epilogue, the film follows the physical and spiritual voyage of the title character, a 15th century Russian icon painter desperately seeking divine inspiration for his work. Commissioned for a project to decorate the Cathedral of the Annunciation, Rublev embarks on a lengthy journey to Moscow, and on the way bears witnesses to the darkness in the world around him.

Looking for a sign from God that will grant him the means to continue his work, Rublev instead finds himself in the middle of a brutal Tartan raid, at the end of which he is forced to kill to protect another. Traumatized by this experience, he takes a vow of silence and ceases his work, which lasts for many years, until he finally witnesses something that allows him to regain his faith. To contextualize the film within Tarkovsky’s filmography, it is closer to the relatively straightforward storytelling of his debut Ivan’s Childhood than the more oblique constructions of later films like The Mirror and The Sacrifice. It’s also the first film of Tarkovsky’s to bring in a heavy spiritual component, which would come to define so much of his later work. Andrei Rublev is interested in the connection between art and spirituality, and how one man sees these two elements as inseparable from each other. In this examination of Rublev’s inner turmoil, the film is surprisingly intimate, but at the same time, the scope is incredibly epic. Much in the same vein as Frantisek Vlacil’s 1967 Czech epic Marketa Lazarova, Andrei Rublev focuses in on the early transitions from a godless to an enlightened era, and dramatizes the violent clashes that resulted from this transition. The film is sometimes unapologetic in its brutality, but the final episode and epilogue closes everything out with an affirmation of the possibility of a divine presence. It feels good to have finally taken the time to watch this film, and to be left at the end with a feeling that its lofty reputation is entirely justified. 10/10.


FINE. FINE. I'll watch this movie!

Seriously, thanks for the write-up. Definitely one of my white whales too

_________________
I'm lithe and fierce as a tiger


Fri Nov 08, 2013 11:06 am
Profile
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 10:42 pm
Posts: 1349
Location: Bangkok
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Ministry of Fear (1944)

My second Fritz Lang after Metropolis, which I love. This is a step down, I feel. There are some great individual moments, but as a whole it's not quite satisfying, with a few logical holes and stock type characters. Still, enjoyable enough for the nicely byzantine plot and full of mesmerizing visuals. 7/10

Shaun of the Dead (2004)
Hot Fuzz (2007)

Both first rewatches. My opinion of Shaun remains about the same (really enjoy it even if it loses a little steam in the third act). Hot Fuzz improves considerably, though still less than Shaun for me. I still feel Fuzz's length, even though I notice more details and gags than the first time for it not to never get boring, and it has the best ending stretch of the trilogy. 8/10 both

The World's End (2013)

This is a relatively saner one in the trilogy, both in term of direction and characters. For about its first one or two acts, I thought this might have a chance of surpassing Scott Pilgrim as my favorite of Edgar Wright. The more realistic approach to characters/story and the melancholic rumination about youth really appeal to me, without losing the humor (even though that becomes more relaxed, as befit the tone). However, after the sci-fi element becomes more pronounced in the second half, it loses its energy a bit, and the climax is messy. Still, the positives are strong enough for this to be my favorite of the trilogy (if not of Edgar Wright). It also contains more all-around quality performances, especially Simon Pegg, who proves really adept at both humor and pathos. Easily his best performance yet. 8/10


Fri Nov 08, 2013 2:59 pm
Profile
Cinematographer
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2012 9:35 pm
Posts: 654
Location: Puerto Rico
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Sexual Chocolate wrote:
Memento

A critical and cult favorite, this is the film that announced that Chris Nolan was a director to be taken seriously. It is Rashomon-like in its structure and tone, and in some ways is equal to that Kurosawa classic. We know that a man is looking to take vengeance after his wife's murder, but everything else is a haze of confusion. Since the lead character (a stellar performance by Guy Pearce) has no short-term memory, it throws everything into question. Are the people who try to help him really trying to do so? What is his real identity? Was he even married? How much of this exists only in the reality he knows? I believe multiple people could watch this film and come away with entirely different conclusions. It is to Nolan's credit that Memento remains suspenseful throughout; this is a complex film, and there is much more to it than what is on the surface.

In short, Nolan would go on to make other worthwhile films, but to this day has not made anything this engaging and riveting in its complexity.


I'd be inclined to agree, although I'm a huge fan of The Prestige and would put it a notch below Memento. Still, I agree that Memento is a nearly excellent film.

_________________
"Get busy living, or get busy dying"

Visit my site: Thief12 profile


Fri Nov 08, 2013 8:30 pm
Profile WWW
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 30, 2009 1:35 am
Posts: 2022
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
peng wrote:
Ministry of Fear (1944)

My second Fritz Lang after Metropolis, which I love. This is a step down, I feel. There are some great individual moments, but as a whole it's not quite satisfying, with a few logical holes and stock type characters. Still, enjoyable enough for the nicely byzantine plot and full of mesmerizing visuals. 7/10


I saw Lang's Nibelungen duology a long time ago, but what really me hooked on him was seeing Metropolis, M, and The Testament of Dr. Mabuse back to back, which are all classics. I'm closing in on 20 Langs, and disliked only one (Clash by Night). I really like his early silent Destiny (aka Weary Death, Tired Death and Der müde Tod), which is the film The Seventh Seal is supposed to be.* Ministry of Fear is minor Lang, which shows you how good he is. Check out his films with Edward G. Robinson. It's a match made in heaven. He's up there with Hitchcock, Spielberg, Scorsese and Kurosawa in the director pantheon.

* So is Victor Sjöström's The Phantom Carriage. I'm going to have to rant on The Seventh Seal in "Can a Movie Be a Classic Without Being Good?"

_________________
Evil does not wear a bonnet!--Mr. Tinkles


Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:14 pm
Profile
Critic
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:35 am
Posts: 7280
Location: Easton, MD
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
All Is Lost (2013) ***1/2

Does any one know where the love of God goes when the waves turn the minutes to hours?

You know, 2013 is starting to look like a pretty stellar year for movies: I would say that All Is Lost had guaranteed itself a spot in my EotY Top 10, but then I've said that about seven times this year and we're barely in November. Still, it's really quite a film. Minimalist in the best possible way. Bresson at sea! Despite jettisoning all dialogue and backstory, the film makes us care profoundly for Robert Redford's character. He's credited as "Our Man," and that's very fitting, as I can rarely remember being so filled with empathy for a character. As such, it's really quite a cinematic journey. It's one I recommend you all take.

Also, I predict that lazy English teachers will use this forever to explain "Man vs. Nature," for it's pretty much the epitome of the theme.

_________________
I'm lithe and fierce as a tiger


Fri Nov 08, 2013 11:43 pm
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 6:26 pm
Posts: 2157
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
Bresson at sea!

Look, Robin: Commissioner Kunz has lit the Ken-Signal! WE HAVEN'T A MOMENT TO LOSE.

*cue theme music*

_________________
The temptation is to like what you should like--not what you do like... another temptation is to come up with an interesting reason for liking it that may not actually be the reason you like it.


Sat Nov 09, 2013 12:18 am
Profile
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 10:42 pm
Posts: 1349
Location: Bangkok
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Syd Henderson wrote:
I saw Lang's Nibelungen duology a long time ago, but what really me hooked on him was seeing Metropolis, M, and The Testament of Dr. Mabuse back to back, which are all classics. I'm closing in on 20 Langs, and disliked only one (Clash by Night). I really like his early silent Destiny (aka Weary Death, Tired Death and Der müde Tod), which is the film The Seventh Seal is supposed to be.* Ministry of Fear is minor Lang, which shows you how good he is. Check out his films with Edward G. Robinson. It's a match made in heaven. He's up there with Hitchcock, Spielberg, Scorsese and Kurosawa in the director pantheon.


Gonna see M and Testament real soon. I look up his films with Edward G. Robinson, and there are two of them right?

Frances Ha (2013)

Woody Allen's Manhattan meets HBO's Girls (Adam Driver's presence only made the connection more pronounced), and it's very delightful with a natural, charming performance by Greta Gerwig. As a character she's very flawed, but the way Gerwig played her we are never less than invested in her life and wished for her to get a break. The main relationship with her best friend (Sting's daughter!) is never overplayed but portrayed with enough truth and gravitas for it to pay off poignantly in an amazing scene at the end. It's not much of a long-arc story, more like glimpses of Frances' life as she tried to make a place for herself in New York. Speaking of, NY looked absolutely magical and timeless in gorgeous black-and-white. 8.5/10

In April the Following Year There Was a Fire (2012)

Sigh. Sometimes I think Thailand has only two modes of cinema: free-fall indie and narrative(or fight)-fueled commercial, with a small number of often wonderful exceptions in between. I haven't seen much or possibly any of the former (Apichatpong Weerasethakul and his ilks), but this movie is one of them, and I'm not too impressed with it.

The film attempts to blur the lines between childhood memories of the filmmaker and a narrative story, mainly about a man coming back from Bangkok to his northeast hometown and reconnect with his past, with a slightly meta edge of him being an engineering drop-out wanting to be an indie filmmaker. The film has some dry wit in this meta regard, with talks about Uncle Boonmee, indie filmmaking, and even a cheesy romantic scene turning out to be a film shoot. It even attempts a political bent, referencing the 2006 Thai coup in the news. Some northeast culture may be to some interest, but ultimately, the blurring of two potentially interesting aspects shouldn't have been this lifeless, drab, and unimaginative. 4/10


Sat Nov 09, 2013 1:24 am
Profile
Critic
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:35 am
Posts: 7280
Location: Easton, MD
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Ken wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
Bresson at sea!

Look, Robin: Commissioner Kunz has lit the Ken-Signal! WE HAVEN'T A MOMENT TO LOSE.

*cue theme music*


This made me laugh for perhaps a solid half minute. Well-played sir. And yes, do see the movie

_________________
I'm lithe and fierce as a tiger


Sat Nov 09, 2013 10:12 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15725 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 667, 668, 669, 670, 671, 672, 673 ... 787  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forum/DivisionCore.
Translated by Xaphos © 2007, 2008, 2009 phpBB.fr