Discussion of movies and ReelThoughts topics

It is currently Fri Sep 19, 2014 4:46 am




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16155 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 660, 661, 662, 663, 664, 665, 666 ... 808  Next
Last Movie You Watched 
Author Message
Director
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 5:07 pm
Posts: 1563
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Syd Henderson wrote:
He reminds me of Don Cheadle, which was one of the fun aspects of Talk to Me, where he was playing the 'Don Cheadle Role' while Cheadle was playing, what, the Samuel Jackson role? I suspect they could have exchanged parts with ease.

I was introduced to Chewy through Love Actually, though I really remember him from Serenity as well. As for Cheadle, my first awareness was in Traffic, although he was also in Boogie Nights. I bet he's more known for the Iron Man movies than Hotel Rwanda and Crash.


I first saw Cheadle in Devil In A Blue Dress, CHewy in Four Brothers or Inside Man.

_________________
This ain't a city council meeting you know-Joe Cabot

Cinema is a matter of what's in the frame and what's out-Martin Scorsese.

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1347771599


Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:01 am
Profile
Second Unit Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 10:51 pm
Posts: 426
Location: Durham, NC
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Hill (1965) 4/4

Every so often there is a film that is hiding from you—a film that is in one of your favorite director’s portfolio, yet somehow you’ve managed to overlook it, or in my case be completely oblivious to it. This was such the case with The Hill, a film set in a North African prison camp in World War II, starring Sean Connery as a by the books, yet against the system kind of guy. The acting in this film is phenomenal, but it’s Harry Andrews (as R.S.M. Wilson), a raw, gruff soul who spits his dialogue out through his clenched teeth, that truly steals the show. The Hill is not only a great commentary on punishment, but it also looks at the effects of war outside of the warzone; how a man can be pushed to his physical and mental limits through the daunting task of carrying out orders. It would be a travesty to not mention the beautiful cinematography and highly impressing long shots present within the film. Sidney Lumet has a great body of work, but I would go as far to say that The Hill embodies all the great elements of this director’s work, and should be placed within the grouping of Network, 12 Angry Men, and Fail Safe.

Captain Phillips (2013) 3.5/4

I think its safe to say that a lot of people are getting caught up on the “inaccuracies” of this film and are completely overlooking the excellent craft that went into making this overly satisfying thrill ride. After a slow, and arguably clunky first 10-15 minutes, Captain Phillips sets sails literally and figuratively. Even with a short amount of time to give viewers a sliver of character back-story, Greengrass does a pretty splendid job developing our two “main” leads as broken, strained individuals. Captain Phillips isn’t extremely deep; it does offer some light, interesting commentary on globalization and its spread of an arguable false notion of the American Dream. Yet Captain Phillips truly shines in its last act, which is in my opinion the best use of tension and spatial representation in a film this year.

Detropia (2012) 2.5/4

On a visual level, Detropia is extremely well shot and offers a great, looking glass quality to the city of Detroit. However Detropia seems largely unfocused at times, switching back and forth from issue to issue, solution to solution, without really commenting on the aspects of social and economic change that it is analyzing.

Drug War (2012) 3/4

This film is an absolute blast. Not only is To’s newest film clever, it is extremely intelligent and demands that viewers give it their full attention. Putting aside an extreme lack of character development and a shifty third act, Drug War is an extremely rewarding film that offers some pretty solid acting, a pulsating score, and an overall amusing, action oriented style.

Enough Said (2013) 2.5/4

I don’t want to be the guy that hates on Gandolfini’s last film, but Enough Said is a pretty standard, predictable film riddled with formula. Sure it’s warm and fuzzy. Even a good amount of grins and a handful of laughs are had here and there. Nevertheless, nothing raises this film above and beyond mediocrity. If I’m the guy who has to go against the 95% RT rating and say it, so be it.

_________________
"I have now come to claim that satisfaction."


Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:22 am
Profile
Cinematographer
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 2:41 pm
Posts: 649
Location: The Desert
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JackBurns wrote:
The Hill (1965) 4/4

Every so often there is a film that is hiding from you—a film that is in one of your favorite director’s portfolio, yet somehow you’ve managed to overlook it, or in my case be completely oblivious to it. This was such the case with The Hill, a film set in a North African prison camp in World War II, starring Sean Connery as a by the books, yet against the system kind of guy. The acting in this film is phenomenal, but it’s Harry Andrews (as R.S.M. Wilson), a raw, gruff soul who spits his dialogue out through his clenched teeth, that truly steals the show. The Hill is not only a great commentary on punishment, but it also looks at the effects of war outside of the warzone; how a man can be pushed to his physical and mental limits through the daunting task of carrying out orders. It would be a travesty to not mention the beautiful cinematography and highly impressing long shots present within the film. Sidney Lumet has a great body of work, but I would go as far to say that The Hill embodies all the great elements of this director’s work, and should be placed within the grouping of Network, 12 Angry Men, and Fail Safe.


Strange, I've never even heard of this. It's been bumped to the top of my Netflix queue. Have you seen The Offence? Another Lumet/Connery collaboration, very dark and gritty. One of Connery's best performances.

JackBurns wrote:
Drug War (2012) 3/4

This film is an absolute blast. Not only is To’s newest film clever, it is extremely intelligent and demands that viewers give it their full attention. Putting aside an extreme lack of character development and a shifty third act, Drug War is an extremely rewarding film that offers some pretty solid acting, a pulsating score, and an overall amusing, action oriented style.


This I added to the queue yesterday. I've been meaning to check out more of To's films. The only one of his I've seen is Vengeance, which was spoken highly of by a former forum member here. Really good, stylish fun.

_________________
"The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool."
Letterboxd Profile


Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:33 am
Profile WWW
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 10:42 pm
Posts: 1419
Location: Bangkok
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Drug War is awesome. I liked quite a bit more than you though. I feel the characters have the advantage of being types first then filled out by little quirks and loyalty enough that you don't need character development to be totally engage to their situation and game of mind. I'd also be curious what you think is "shifty" about the third act, which I personally think is the best part. All storylines and simmering conflicts explode in one of the most well-staged and exciting action scenes I've seen (hyperbole I know, but my hands were almost shaking after the scene).

Thanks for the recommendation. I'd keep an eye out for The Hill.


Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:45 am
Profile
Auteur
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 12:02 pm
Posts: 3603
Location: Zion, IL
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Jeff Wilder wrote:
Syd Henderson wrote:
He reminds me of Don Cheadle, which was one of the fun aspects of Talk to Me, where he was playing the 'Don Cheadle Role' while Cheadle was playing, what, the Samuel Jackson role? I suspect they could have exchanged parts with ease.

I was introduced to Chewy through Love Actually, though I really remember him from Serenity as well. As for Cheadle, my first awareness was in Traffic, although he was also in Boogie Nights. I bet he's more known for the Iron Man movies than Hotel Rwanda and Crash.


I first saw Cheadle in Devil In A Blue Dress, CHewy in Four Brothers or Inside Man.

I first saw Chewy in the made for TV film "Deadly Voyage"


Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:59 am
Profile
Second Unit Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 10:51 pm
Posts: 426
Location: Durham, NC
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blonde Almond wrote:
Strange, I've never even heard of this. It's been bumped to the top of my Netflix queue. Have you seen The Offence? Another Lumet/Connery collaboration, very dark and gritty. One of Connery's best performances.


I have not, but I'm adding that to the queue right now! And definitely check out Drug War, its a fun ride.

peng wrote:
Drug War is awesome. I liked quite a bit more than you though. I feel the characters have the advantage of being types first then filled out by little quirks and loyalty enough that you don't need character development to be totally engage to their situation and game of mind. I'd also be curious what you think is "shifty" about the third act, which I personally think is the best part. All storylines and simmering conflicts explode in one of the most well-staged and exciting action scenes I've seen (hyperbole I know, but my hands were almost shaking after the scene).

Thanks for the recommendation. I'd keep an eye out for The Hill.


See thats my issue. The characters do feel very "typed," and I never felt like they were conveyed as "characters"--more so white hat/black hat--I craved a bit more development and less archetype if that makes sense?

Also the third act:

[Reveal] Spoiler:
The film seems to be going down this really well crafted, tight route where Zhang is masterfully playing a chameleon to take down both sides (Honglei's acting is pretty superb when he's switching between Haha and Chang IMO) with the help of Choi. However, the reveal of Uncle Bill being a puppet really came out of nowhere, and I honestly felt shorted. Sure, the last shootout is awesome, but it really came out of left field. I'm usually a fan when films go to a different place, but this one didn't work for me as well, and just seemed a little too farfetched.


But yea, I can definitely see the love Peng. I'm a fan for sure. Maybe I'm lowballing it too much? :D

Oh and how great was the...

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Shoot out scene with the Deaf Brothers

_________________
"I have now come to claim that satisfaction."


Sun Oct 20, 2013 2:07 am
Profile
Assistant Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2012 2:42 pm
Posts: 942
Location: New Zealand
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Olympus has Fall... oh wait... sorry, White House Down.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2334879/
STUDIO A Exec: "Everybody stop what you're doing RIGHT NOW! We just got wind that Studio B is making an attack on The White House movie. Why did we not think of that!? Start writing, we can't let them own this space!"

After Olympus Has Fallen (which was actually pretty good), my expectations were that this would be at least ok in a knock-off sort of way. Yeah, nah. Once I saw "Roland Emmerich" during the titles I knew I was be in trouble, and that sinking feeling was soon confirmed. I was tempted to fast forward through the incredibly mundane action scenes, but I soon realised I wanted even more to fast forward through the even worse exposition scenes. Sometimes you're just better off enjoying the popcorn without the movie to go with it.
4/10.


Sun Oct 20, 2013 3:08 am
Profile
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 10:42 pm
Posts: 1419
Location: Bangkok
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JackBurns wrote:
See thats my issue. The characters do feel very "typed," and I never felt like they were conveyed as "characters"--more so white hat/black hat--I craved a bit more development and less archetype if that makes sense?


Understood. Just different stroke I guess. I am fine with the typed characters if the actors are good and they do more interesting with them later on, in which case I feel they accomplished that with the white hat one being a little more ruthless than I thought and the black hat gaining ambiguity.

Quote:
Oh and how great was the...

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Shoot out scene with the Deaf Brothers


That was pretty great, and what I meant when I think they brought in different storylines and conflicts into one big action scene quite well, and the reason why I don't mind when the film goes to a different place. Of course again, personal preference.


Sun Oct 20, 2013 3:19 am
Profile
Cinematographer
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2012 9:35 pm
Posts: 743
Location: Puerto Rico
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
On DVD...

The Descent Continuing my watch/rewatch of horror films, yesterday I revisited one of my favorite, recent horror films. The Descent is a tight and effective film that knows both how to make you jump, and how to take its time with its plot. During its first hour, the film handles perfectly its jump scares as well as the claustrophobic elements of being deep in a cave. But when it unleashes its real evil on the characters, it's relentless. There is perhaps one tiny, cheesy moment when the lead character gets a scream out, and the execution of the conflict between her and best friend Juno might not be perfect, but dammit, it still works beautifully. Grade: A-

On TV...

And just when I finished that one, Mission: Impossible III was starting on cable, and I've never been able to resist it. I really, really love this film, and the more I see it, the more I like it. To me, it's probably one of the best recent action films out there. Coming after the crapfest that was M:I-II, this part restores most of the team element of it all while providing great tension and action sequences (The Chesapeake Bay Bridge scene still remains as one of the greatest action scenes I've seen recently). Plus, Phillip Seymour Hoffman is just devilishly good as the bad guy. I do think the film loses a bit of momentum in its last moments, but it's still great, and probably tied with the first one as the best of the series for me. Grade: A-

_________________
"Get busy living, or get busy dying"

Visit my site: Thief12 profile


Sun Oct 20, 2013 8:28 am
Profile WWW
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 10:42 pm
Posts: 1419
Location: Bangkok
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Horror-tinged day.

Cat People (1942)

Two expertly suggestive scenes asides (street stalking and swimming pool), the film doesn't feel like a horror as its reputation would suggest. Still a very good noir drama and great directing, with one complex character at the center of it. And the men in this story are such dicks. 8/10

I Walked With A Zombie (1943)

It lacks a strong character as the one in the last Jacques Tourneur I watched above, but I liked this better. The story is more interesting, the setting evocative, and the atmosphere stronger. 8/10

Martin (1976)


I love George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead. It's one of my favorite films. I find Dawn of the Dead rich in ideas but flawed in execution. Now, his Martin takes what problems I have with Dawn and then multiplied by quite a degree. It has some very interesting ideas about the vampire genre, but it's undone by mostly shoddy camerawork (saved for a few memorable shots), generic to bad acting, and the rough flow of the narrative. 5/10

Friday the 13th Part II (1981)


The first one is one of the better slashers from those years for me (generic, sure, but go down easy and I rather like the third act), where as this sequel mirrored the first one a little too closely in the first two thirds, and I was not pleased with what happened to the intensely likeable lead from the first one; luckily it has another Final Girl as equally likeable to root for (Ginny). The third act delivered a fair bit, even though it's lacking the punch of its predecessor's last two or three scenes. 6.5/10


Sun Oct 20, 2013 10:36 am
Profile
Critic
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:35 am
Posts: 7419
Location: Easton, MD
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blonde Almond wrote:
JackBurns wrote:
The Hill (1965) 4/4

Every so often there is a film that is hiding from you—a film that is in one of your favorite director’s portfolio, yet somehow you’ve managed to overlook it, or in my case be completely oblivious to it. This was such the case with The Hill, a film set in a North African prison camp in World War II, starring Sean Connery as a by the books, yet against the system kind of guy. The acting in this film is phenomenal, but it’s Harry Andrews (as R.S.M. Wilson), a raw, gruff soul who spits his dialogue out through his clenched teeth, that truly steals the show. The Hill is not only a great commentary on punishment, but it also looks at the effects of war outside of the warzone; how a man can be pushed to his physical and mental limits through the daunting task of carrying out orders. It would be a travesty to not mention the beautiful cinematography and highly impressing long shots present within the film. Sidney Lumet has a great body of work, but I would go as far to say that The Hill embodies all the great elements of this director’s work, and should be placed within the grouping of Network, 12 Angry Men, and Fail Safe.


Strange, I've never even heard of this. It's been bumped to the top of my Netflix queue.



Oh yay! I recommended it to Jack, then him to you, and we can all have Sidney Lumet love.

_________________
I'm lithe and fierce as a tiger


Sun Oct 20, 2013 11:14 am
Profile
Critic
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:35 am
Posts: 7419
Location: Easton, MD
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JackBurns wrote:


Captain Phillips (2013) 3.5/4

I think its safe to say that a lot of people are getting caught up on the “inaccuracies” of this film and are completely overlooking the excellent craft that went into making this overly satisfying thrill ride. After a slow, and arguably clunky first 10-15 minutes, Captain Phillips sets sails literally and figuratively. Even with a short amount of time to give viewers a sliver of character back-story, Greengrass does a pretty splendid job developing our two “main” leads as broken, strained individuals. Captain Phillips isn’t extremely deep; it does offer some light, interesting commentary on globalization and its spread of an arguable false notion of the American Dream. Yet Captain Phillips truly shines in its last act, which is in my opinion the best use of tension and spatial representation in a film this year.


Ahem, neither boat is a sailing boat!

I also want to single out, in the last act that (as you mentioned) is terrific, the scene where Hanks is suffering from shock and being treated by the brisk doctor is some terrific acting. First nod for Hanks since Cast Away coming up?

_________________
I'm lithe and fierce as a tiger


Sun Oct 20, 2013 11:18 am
Profile
Second Unit Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 10:51 pm
Posts: 426
Location: Durham, NC
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
peng wrote:
Understood. Just different stroke I guess. I am fine with the typed characters if the actors are good and they do more interesting with them later on, in which case I feel they accomplished that with the white hat one being a little more ruthless than I thought and the black hat gaining ambiguity.


I concede that there is quite a bit of ambiguity in both of the characters; Zhang seems to love what he is doing throughout the film. (i.e. taking on new personas)

JamesKunz wrote:
Ahem, neither boat is a sailing boat!

I also want to single out, in the last act that (as you mentioned) is terrific, the scene where Hanks is suffering from shock and being treated by the brisk doctor is some terrific acting. First nod for Hanks since Cast Away coming up?


Oh man, typos are very prevalent in that post---it would be sets sail, not "sets sails" jeez--- my apologies. And way to completely ruin my phrasing JamesKunz! :cry:

_________________
"I have now come to claim that satisfaction."


Sun Oct 20, 2013 2:10 pm
Profile
Cinematographer
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 2:41 pm
Posts: 649
Location: The Desert
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Hana - Hirokazu Koreeda’s 2008 film Still Walking was for me about as perfect an introduction to a filmmaker as you could possibly have. After being completely captivated by that film, I suppose it was inevitable that my second pick from the director would feel like a comedown, and this 2006 effort probably wasn’t the best choice for a follow-up. Set in the early 1700s during Japan’s Genroku era, the film follows a young samurai who has ventured out into the world to seek out his father’s killer and take revenge, despite his almost complete lack of skill with the sword. His journey leads him to a slum, where he ends up settling down and getting distracted by the plights of the local poor. During his stay there, he grows to care about the various people, and contributes to the small society by setting up writing classes, taking part in local theater activities, and lightly courting a widowed mother. His pursuit of revenge falls by the wayside for a good while, at least until he discovers that the man he’s been searching for is a part of the community.

The film carries the subtitle The Tale of a Reluctant Samurai, but a traditional chambara film, this is not. There are no swordfights, or really any scenes of violence for that matter. Instead, the film plays more as a mash-up of a bunch of other types of films, combining surprisingly lowball comedy, a charming romance, and even some heartwarming moments that wouldn’t feel out of place in a Frank Capra film. The focus ends up being less on samurai exploits and more on the interactions between the peasants and the various relationship issues that play out between them. There is a parallel story that concerns the classic Japanese legend of the 47 ronin, but Hana is more about what was happening off to the side when this famous story was going on close by. With Still Walking, there was an easy connection to make to the films of Yasujiro Ozu, and that connection, although less overt, can also be made here. The film has a relaxing pace, almost too relaxing I’d say, to the point where it sometimes come across as aimless. It seems content to glide unassumingly by, even if that means never making a particularly strong impression on the viewer. 6/10.

Argento’s Dracula 3D - 30 years ago, the prospect of Italian horror master Dario Argento tackling Bram Stoker’s Dracula would have been incredibly tantalizing. Today, not so much, but that didn’t stop the 73 year-old director from trying anyway. You should know the story by now: naive Jonathan Harker (Unax Ugalde, who bears a strong resemblance to Keanu Reeves; in fact, it seems like everyone in this film has been cast to look like their counterparts in Francis Ford Coppola’s famous 1992 adaptation) journeys to an isolated Transylvanian town to work for the reclusive Count Dracula (Thomas Kretschmann, the sensitive Nazi captain from The Pianist). Soon enough, Jonathan discovers the Count’s abnormal thirst for blood and finds himself a prisoner in his secluded castle. It is then that the Count turns his attentions to Jonathan’s virginal fiancé Mina (Winona Ryder lookalike Marta Gastini). It’s up to her and renowned vampire hunter Van Helsing (a craggy Rutger Hauer, looking like someone just woke him up from his nap) to battle back against the evil vampire, all leading to a hilarious final confrontation. To put it simply, Argento’s Dracula 3D is a disaster, the kind of film where you’re just left shaking your head, wondering how it could’ve all gone so horribly wrong. It’s with a certain degree of sheepishness that I admit the film’s greatest virtue is in its levels of skin shown. It’s not quite on the same level as something like Blood For Dracula, but it comes close, and at the very least you can say Argento brought back some eroticism to what has always been a tale full of simmering sexuality.

It would be easy to point to the terrible acting, or the cheesy digital effects, or the mangling of a classic story as the main reason why Argento’s Dracula 3D crashes and burns, but what stood out to me to be the most perplexing element is just how damn bright the whole thing is. Not in that colorful way that Argento is famous for, but in a “why is everything so overlit?” way. My guess is that it has something to do with shooting in digital and in 3D, and the filmmakers overcompensated on their lighting to combat the darkening effects of the 3D glasses (for the record, I saw the film in 2D On Demand at home). Whatever the reason, the overwhelming lightness results in one of the more non-atmospheric horror films I’ve seen. I’m tempted to throw out the old “so bad it’s actually really entertaining” chestnut, but honestly there’s something disheartening about seeing a formerly-great horror director completely losing the plot. Maybe the film will have some life down the road as a sort of ironic cult classic, but I feel it’s just as likely that people will go out of their way to forget it. 3/10.

_________________
"The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool."
Letterboxd Profile


Sun Oct 20, 2013 4:27 pm
Profile WWW
Critic
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:35 am
Posts: 7419
Location: Easton, MD
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Catching Hell (2011) ***

If you're a baseball fan, you know who Steve Bartman is. A fan thrust into the spotlight in 2003 when he attempted to catch a foul ball that Cubs outfielder Moises Alou likely would have come down with, Bartman has become a legendary -- and infamous -- figure in Cubs lore ever since. This documentary looks to examine what happened that day, and does a very good job of it. I wouldn't recommend it to people who don't have at least a passing interest in baseball, but to those who do, it's a solid doc.

_________________
I'm lithe and fierce as a tiger


Sun Oct 20, 2013 4:50 pm
Profile
Director

Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2012 7:44 pm
Posts: 1712
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Prom

One of the more amusing and solidly directed highschool chick flicks. Definitely not bad as a reminder of what girls sometimes want to see.


Sun Oct 20, 2013 5:07 pm
Profile
Cinematographer
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2012 9:35 pm
Posts: 743
Location: Puerto Rico
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
Catching Hell (2011) ***

If you're a baseball fan, you know who Steve Bartman is. A fan thrust into the spotlight in 2003 when he attempted to catch a foul ball that Cubs outfielder Moises Alou likely would have come down with, Bartman has become a legendary -- and infamous -- figure in Cubs lore ever since. This documentary looks to examine what happened that day, and does a very good job of it. I wouldn't recommend it to people who don't have at least a passing interest in baseball, but to those who do, it's a solid doc.


I love this doc. I've seen it a couple of times and find myself engaged every time. I think it does a great job of presenting the story and juxtaposing it with other similar situations. It's a really impressive thing what happened, but what I admire more is the integrity with which Bartman has faced the situation. Everyone else would've cashed in on what happened, and I admire him for the way he has faced it all.

_________________
"Get busy living, or get busy dying"

Visit my site: Thief12 profile


Sun Oct 20, 2013 7:32 pm
Profile WWW
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 10:42 pm
Posts: 1419
Location: Bangkok
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Bling Ring (2013)

All actors give very good and convincing performances for some pretty soulless characters. It went on for too long (even at barely 90 minutes) without varying its points or story beats, but the cinematography is great. 7/10

The Way, Way Back (2013)

From the premise, I didn't expect the film to be so rooted in realism as it is. It really feels like something that could happen a hundred times over in many family. Although this makes the film almost too low-key in the early going, for me it has a cumulative effect of us getting very involved in all the characters and their situations by the end. 8/10

Freaks (1932)

The setting and characters elevate the melodrama-type story a lot. Surprisingly good first-time performances abound from key characters, freaks or otherwise, in the circus. And the ending is certainly disturbing and memorable. 7.5/10


Mon Oct 21, 2013 12:52 am
Profile
Producer

Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2009 11:04 am
Posts: 2191
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
All on a **** scale:

Escape Plan - ***

Lots of fun. Arnold and Caviezel are especially great.


After Earth - **

Not as terrible as I had heard, but not very good either. It's just kind of meh. Felt flat for me. Gorgeous looking movie though.


August: Osage County - ** 1/2

It might have worked as a play, but it doesn't work as a movie. Hard to say why I didn't care for it. But it's so messed up, and so melodramatic and so soap opera-y, I was chuckling through much of the movie. I mean, even in scenes that are not suppose to be funny. It's well acted and the movie looks great (awesome cinematography) and there are a few scenes here and there that worked. But this movie just didn't work for me.


12 Years a Slave - ***

Some individual moments that are powerful and great and gut wrenching and hard to watch, but the movie itself, as a whole, just falls shy of greatness. Not sure why. Maybe it's the pacing. It's not THAT long, just slightly over two hours, but it felt long. Pacing is off and on. Ebbs and flow. Ultimately, I feel like the movie's whole is not the sum of it's parts. The ending is incredibly moving though. And Chiwitel Ejiofor deserves all of the accolades being bestowed upon him.


Mon Oct 21, 2013 2:14 am
Profile
Critic
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:35 am
Posts: 7419
Location: Easton, MD
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
peng wrote:

The Way, Way Back (2013)

From the premise, I didn't expect the film to be so rooted in realism as it is. It really feels like something that could happen a hundred times over in many family. Although this makes the film almost too low-key in the early going, for me it has a cumulative effect of us getting very involved in all the characters and their situations by the end. 8/10
]


You didn't find it achingly familiar? Or that the main character was really rather dislikable, or at the very least bland?

_________________
I'm lithe and fierce as a tiger


Mon Oct 21, 2013 6:27 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16155 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 660, 661, 662, 663, 664, 665, 666 ... 808  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forum/DivisionCore.
Translated by Xaphos © 2007, 2008, 2009 phpBB.fr