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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
NotHughGrant wrote:
peng wrote:
Let the Right One In (2008)

Wow. I love Let Me In and was curious how the original which most people prefer would compare. It still think LMI is better in a few aspects, especially in some plot-related details and Owen/Oskar character, but the original's atmosphere just can't be beat (the remake's is pretty great in itself, so that's saying something). So chilling you can almost feel the cold. I love both version pretty much the same now, with maybe a very, very slight edge towards LMI. Still, it's great to find two versions of the same story to be at the top of their genre. 9/10


I think I'm the only person I know who didn't like Let the Right One In.

What am I missing? Because I just can't see the attraction.

You're not the only one, I didn't see the attraction either, the remake 'Let Me In" was a mild improvement, though not by very much.


Fri Oct 18, 2013 12:51 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
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I think I'm the only person I know who didn't like Let the Right One In.

What am I missing? Because I just can't see the attraction.


A touching and horror-tinged relationship between two social outcasts who find acceptance in each other, in which the expertly filmed and chilling atmosphere in Sweden, apart from being a great setting, further emphasized the feeling of loneliness in which the characters faced. And then there'er the haunting hints of Eli's past and Oskar's future, which could render the pure relationship of now turning toxic down the line as happened with her previous handler.

That about sums it up for me, but you know... different stroke. I'm curious though how you would feel about the remake. It's basically the same story (slightly more focused on the relationship), but with enough subtle differences to maybe get you to feel more for it. No local (and cat) subplot, the boy lead is better, Moretz both warmer and scarier, and so on.


Fri Oct 18, 2013 1:13 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
NotHughGrant wrote:
peng wrote:
Let the Right One In (2008)

Wow. I love Let Me In and was curious how the original which most people prefer would compare. It still think LMI is better in a few aspects, especially in some plot-related details and Owen/Oskar character, but the original's atmosphere just can't be beat (the remake's is pretty great in itself, so that's saying something). So chilling you can almost feel the cold. I love both version pretty much the same now, with maybe a very, very slight edge towards LMI. Still, it's great to find two versions of the same story to be at the top of their genre. 9/10


I think I'm the only person I know who didn't like Let the Right One In.

What am I missing? Because I just can't see the attraction.


Not a damn thing. All that movie had was a nice idea and great cinematography but other than that it was just plain old European garbage.


Fri Oct 18, 2013 4:20 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
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I think I'm the only person I know who didn't like Let the Right One In.

What am I missing? Because I just can't see the attraction.


I didn't really like it either. Byzantium was more interesting and psychological.


Fri Oct 18, 2013 4:51 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
patrick wrote:
NotHughGrant wrote:
peng wrote:
Let the Right One In (2008)

Wow. I love Let Me In and was curious how the original which most people prefer would compare. It still think LMI is better in a few aspects, especially in some plot-related details and Owen/Oskar character, but the original's atmosphere just can't be beat (the remake's is pretty great in itself, so that's saying something). So chilling you can almost feel the cold. I love both version pretty much the same now, with maybe a very, very slight edge towards LMI. Still, it's great to find two versions of the same story to be at the top of their genre. 9/10


I think I'm the only person I know who didn't like Let the Right One In.

What am I missing? Because I just can't see the attraction.


Not a damn thing. All that movie had was a nice idea and great cinematography but other than that it was just plain old European garbage.


Oh, Patrick...

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Fri Oct 18, 2013 11:34 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Near Dark (1987)

I have a slightly blasphemous opinion of Point Break not doing much for me, so I am surprised by how much I love Near Dark. The film just exudes both coolness and horrific beauty. I feel Bigelow's directorial touches fit this material perfectly, highlighting the vampires' nastiness (that bar scene is something), touching love story, and western-like performances in a way that's hugely entertaining. 8.5/10

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920)

A film I admire far more than enjoy. The set designs are spectacular and arresting, and the ending, of which I should have seen coming, surprises me and elevates the film a lot, but other than that it's a rather passive viewing. It does manage a few creepy passages (the somnambulist approaching the girl; his first appearance) though. Much prefer Nosferatu. 7/10


Sat Oct 19, 2013 1:52 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
peng wrote:
Near Dark (1987)

I have a slightly blasphemous opinion of Point Break not doing much for me, so I am surprised by how much I love Near Dark. The film just exudes both coolness and horrific beauty. I feel Bigelow's directorial touches fit this material perfectly, highlighting the vampires' nastiness (that bar scene is something), touching love story, and western-like performances in a way that's hugely entertaining. 8.5/10

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920)

A film I admire far more than enjoy. The set designs are spectacular and arresting, and the ending, of which I should have seen coming, surprises me and elevates the film a lot, but other than that it's a rather passive viewing. It does manage a few creepy passages (the somnambulist approaching the girl; his first appearance) though. Much prefer Nosferatu. 7/10

Whereas I have the slightly blasphemous opinion of not loving Near Dark, I found most of the characters to be rather uninteresting and in some cases outright annoying(the kid) and the love story really didn't do much for me, usually i'm a sucker for those types of stories but this one just didn't grab me. The one thing that really bugged me was
[Reveal] Spoiler:
vampires who have been alive for hundreds of years weren't smart didn't consider to block their car windows beforehand so that they wouldn't get burned to a crisp
.


Sat Oct 19, 2013 3:09 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Yours isn't unpopular opinion since Point Break is way better regarded around the net, at least from what I've seen.


Sat Oct 19, 2013 4:12 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
patrick wrote:
NotHughGrant wrote:
peng wrote:
Let the Right One In (2008)

Wow. I love Let Me In and was curious how the original which most people prefer would compare. It still think LMI is better in a few aspects, especially in some plot-related details and Owen/Oskar character, but the original's atmosphere just can't be beat (the remake's is pretty great in itself, so that's saying something). So chilling you can almost feel the cold. I love both version pretty much the same now, with maybe a very, very slight edge towards LMI. Still, it's great to find two versions of the same story to be at the top of their genre. 9/10


I think I'm the only person I know who didn't like Let the Right One In.

What am I missing? Because I just can't see the attraction.


Not a damn thing. All that movie had was a nice idea and great cinematography but other than that it was just plain old European garbage.


Bang on! Eurotrash indeed.

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Sat Oct 19, 2013 5:50 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
peng wrote:
Yours isn't unpopular opinion since Point Break is way better regarded around the net, at least from what I've seen.


Wait...Point Break is well-liked? Since when?

And this is coming from somebody who likes Point Break


Sat Oct 19, 2013 8:33 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
patrick wrote:
peng wrote:
Yours isn't unpopular opinion since Point Break is way better regarded around the net, at least from what I've seen.


Wait...Point Break is well-liked? Since when?

And this is coming from somebody who likes Point Break


I've also read a lot of people around the web praising it. Not Die Hard-level praise, but still.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Thin Red Line (1998)

My second Malick after Days of Heaven, and I like it quite a bit more. For about two very absorbing hours, this is heading to be one of my favorite movies. I love the fluid camera work that tracked through lush nature and brutal battle field, and how it weaved in and out of each soldier's point of view, full of terror of what they are going into. But then after the main conflict is over, the film drops in coherence, and its ponderous nature threatens to go over the top. Even so, although it regretfully doesn't stick the landing, the film is still a beautiful, unique experience. 8/10

Despicable Me 2 (2013)


Or as might have been called, the prequel to Minions. The film still has its charm and humor, but the plot is barely thought out and the filler (the eldest daughter's story, for one) is obvious and strained to fill out the running time. However, the film stills light up every time the minions have their hijinks, and I thought it beefs up their roles and integrates them into the storyline quite well. Pleasant diversion but not much more. 7/10

Jacob's Ladder (1990)

Oh man, what a horror trip. Now I'm freaked out before bed. Such a sad, haunting story wrapped in a nightmarish landscape, with so many startling images. A "waking nightmare" film that puts both the protagonist and the audience through the nightmare thoroughly. Tim Robbins's award-worthy performance draws us in and is the key in us being as invested in this world as he is. 9.5/10


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
patrick wrote:
peng wrote:
Yours isn't unpopular opinion since Point Break is way better regarded around the net, at least from what I've seen.


Wait...Point Break is well-liked? Since when?

And this is coming from somebody who likes Point Break


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
12 Years a Slave-- ****

So much praise has been heaped upon this film that there's little I can add. It is indeed as difficult to watch as they say; this movie presents slavery as the monstrosity that it really was, without a Django revenge fantasy moment in sight. In fact, as good as Tarantino's movie was, this movie goes places with the complexity of master/slave relationships that one could only dream of. And while this is a far more mainstream piece of work for Steve McQueen, he still retains a similar style from his previous movies; long takes (some of which are close-ups), scenes of minimalist dialogue, and very little in the way of emotional manipulation. And as for the acting? Oscar noms all around methinks, including Lead Actor (Chiwetel Ejiofor), Supporting Actress (Lupita Nyong'o in her feature debut), and possibly Supporting Actor (Michael Fassbender).

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
KWRoss wrote:
12 Years a Slave-- ****

So much praise has been heaped upon this film that there's little I can add. It is indeed as difficult to watch as they say; this movie presents slavery as the monstrosity that it really was, without a Django revenge fantasy moment in sight. In fact, as good as Tarantino's movie was, this movie goes places with the complexity of master/slave relationships that one could only dream of. And while this is a far more mainstream piece of work for Steve McQueen, he still retains a similar style from his previous movies; long takes (some of which are close-ups), scenes of minimalist dialogue, and very little in the way of emotional manipulation. And as for the acting? Oscar noms all around methinks, including Lead Actor (Chiwetel Ejiofor), Supporting Actress (Lupita Nyong'o in her feature debut), and possibly Supporting Actor (Michael Fassbender).


This hasn't shown up here yet, but it looks like one of the top contenders for Best Picture, along with Gravity. We're also being given a Hollywoodish treatment of the life of Nelson Mandela, but this looks like much the better film. I'd love to see Chiwetel Ejiofor get an Oscar and possibly win, assuming this is one of his best performances. He's a fine actor and I want to hear them pronounce his name. (SF fans call him "Chewy.")

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Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:12 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Syd Henderson wrote:
KWRoss wrote:
12 Years a Slave-- ****

So much praise has been heaped upon this film that there's little I can add. It is indeed as difficult to watch as they say; this movie presents slavery as the monstrosity that it really was, without a Django revenge fantasy moment in sight. In fact, as good as Tarantino's movie was, this movie goes places with the complexity of master/slave relationships that one could only dream of. And while this is a far more mainstream piece of work for Steve McQueen, he still retains a similar style from his previous movies; long takes (some of which are close-ups), scenes of minimalist dialogue, and very little in the way of emotional manipulation. And as for the acting? Oscar noms all around methinks, including Lead Actor (Chiwetel Ejiofor), Supporting Actress (Lupita Nyong'o in her feature debut), and possibly Supporting Actor (Michael Fassbender).


This hasn't shown up here yet, but it looks like one of the top contenders for Best Picture, along with Gravity. We're also being given a Hollywoodish treatment of the life of Nelson Mandela, but this looks like much the better film. I'd love to see Chiwetel Ejiofor get an Oscar and possibly win, assuming this is one of his best performances. He's a fine actor and I want to hear them pronounce his name. (SF fans call him "Chewy.")


Doesn't he know that the letters i and w never go together in English? Come on, man! That aside, I've liked him ever since his tremendous performance in Serenity. Can't wait to see this film -- the acclaim it's received is astonishing

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Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:14 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
He reminds me of Don Cheadle, which was one of the fun aspects of Talk to Me, where he was playing the 'Don Cheadle Role' while Cheadle was playing, what, the Samuel Jackson role? I suspect they could have exchanged parts with ease.

I was introduced to Chewy through Love Actually, though I really remember him from Serenity as well. As for Cheadle, my first awareness was in Traffic, although he was also in Boogie Nights. I bet he's more known for the Iron Man movies than Hotel Rwanda and Crash.

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Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:26 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Syd Henderson wrote:
He reminds me of Don Cheadle, which was one of the fun aspects of Talk to Me, where he was playing the 'Don Cheadle Role' while Cheadle was playing, what, the Samuel Jackson role? I suspect they could have exchanged parts with ease.

I was introduced to Chewy through Love Actually, though I really remember him from Serenity as well. As for Cheadle, my first awareness was in Traffic, although he was also in Boogie Nights. I bet he's more known for the Iron Man movies than Hotel Rwanda and Crash.

My first introduction to Cheadle was in the Dennis Hopper film "Colors"


Sat Oct 19, 2013 11:02 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Charisma - Not often do you come across a film that fashions itself as an “existentialist eco-thriller,” but it’s a label that feels strangely appropriate for this 1999 film from director Kiyoshi Kurosawa. The film opens with a city detective shaken by his failure to negotiate his way through a hostage situation, which resulted in the deaths of both the hostage and the hostage-taker. The detective is given a reprieve from his duties after it becomes clear he was strongly affected by the outcome. Looking for a change in his surroundings, he travels out into the country, where he finds himself caught in the middle of a spirited fight over a very old tree that supposedly carries some sort of mystical significance but is also sapping the life from the rest of the forest. As the detective moves between the two sides of the fight, those who want to save the tree and those who want to destroy it, he finds himself presented with a dilemma: is the life of a single special tree worth sacrificing the health of the forest around it?

The only Kurosawa films I had seen before this one are Cure and Pulse, both of which I found to be incredibly rewarding experiences. Charisma is a tougher film to get a handle on, with its constant changes in tone and character actions that are more metaphorical than realistic. Attempting to find some much-needed context for what I just watched, I was relieved to discover an interview on the DVD where the filmmaker expresses his own doubts on the type of film he ended up making. It definitely feels like a film that was made without a clear idea of what was trying to be accomplished, but that doesn’t mean there’s nothing to admire here. Compared to the more urban-set narratives of Cure and Pulse, the forest environment of Charisma is a welcome change. The different setting doesn’t hinder Kurosawa from his usual mastery of conjuring up atmospheric dread out of seemingly nothing, which in itself is something of an accomplishment. But Kurosawa also seems to recognize the sillier nature of the film’s premise; in the later stages of the film, a supporting character makes a remark to the detective about how the entire situation is just a little ridiculous. It’s a statement that seems appropriate for the film as a whole, but Kurosawa deserves some credit for taking that ridiculous scenario and presenting it in a way that manages to be strangely compelling, even if it never feels entirely successful. 6/10.

Escape From Tomorrow - There probably isn’t any way to talk about this film without getting into the unique methods behind its production, so let’s get right into it. To tell the story of a schlubby, recently-unemployed dad’s nightmarish day at Disney World and his creepy stalking of a pair of French teenage girls, director Randy Moore and his production team brought cameras into the Magic Kingdom/Epcot and “covertly” shot footage within the park premises, without the permission of Disney. The way the publicity campaign has hyped up this fact, you’d be forgiven for thinking the filmmakers got away with murder during production. But it seems to me all this talk about Moore’s “guerrilla” filmmaking style is much ado about nothing. As far as I’m aware, Disney theme parks allow cameras to be brought onto the premises, and there’s nothing really risky about any of the footage that has been shot within the parks; despite the sometimes-artfully composed black-and-white images, this isn’t ever too far removed from simple home movie footage. Whatever “objectionable” content is present in the film comes entirely from terrible, obvious green-screen work or closed-off sets that are clearly not part of the park. The more remarkable story here is that the film has been given a commercial release at all. On that point, Disney has taken the stance of refusing to acknowledge the film’s existence, and I would urge any interested viewers to do the same.

The reason there has been so much emphasis on how the film was made is because it’s a much more interesting topic than the value of the film itself. I’m not completely adverse to the idea of a horror film set inside a Disney theme park. If done properly, I could see that being a really fun idea. In fact, it has been done properly, in a short film called Missing In The Mansion (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0M-yetCGm-A), which explores some of the more sordid Disney lore in a playful way. Even though I am someone who grew up with Disney vacations and still enjoy going to this day, I can sympathize with the idea that there is something inherently creepy about the “Happiest Place On Earth.” But Escape From Tomorrow forgoes any kind of invention in favor of cheap exploitation and obnoxious snobbery. I was reminded of the moment I lost patience with the Banksy film Exit Through The Gift Shop, when the notorious street artist went into Disneyland and set up an inflatable doll of a Guantanamo inmate, sparking panic in the process. My feeling both then and now is that subversive graffiti art is one thing, displaying an image with associations to terrorism in a highly-populated vacation destination is something else entirely. I felt there was a level of mocking derision directed at something that’s never particularly warranted it, and there is an element of that in Escape From Tomorrow. And because Moore’s film isn’t involving in either its construction or its commentary, that “let’s thumb our noses from atop our mighty throne” feeling takes center stage and never exits. My advice is to skip this completely; go watch Westworld instead, or the “Itchy & Scratchy Land” episode of The Simpsons. They make similar points, only with a sense of wit and ability that is almost completely absent here. 2/10.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blonde Almond wrote:

Escape From Tomorrow - There probably isn’t any way to talk about this film without getting into the unique methods behind its production, so let’s get right into it. To tell the story of a schlubby, recently-unemployed dad’s nightmarish day at Disney World and his creepy stalking of a pair of French teenage girls, director Randy Moore and his production team brought cameras into the Magic Kingdom/Epcot and “covertly” shot footage within the park premises, without the permission of Disney. The way the publicity campaign has hyped up this fact, you’d be forgiven for thinking the filmmakers got away with murder during production. But it seems to me all this talk about Moore’s “guerrilla” filmmaking style is much ado about nothing. As far as I’m aware, Disney theme parks allow cameras to be brought onto the premises, and there’s nothing really risky about any of the footage that has been shot within the parks; despite the sometimes-artfully composed black-and-white images, this isn’t ever too far removed from simple home movie footage. Whatever “objectionable” content is present in the film comes entirely from terrible, obvious green-screen work or closed-off sets that are clearly not part of the park. The more remarkable story here is that the film has been given a commercial release at all. On that point, Disney has taken the stance of refusing to acknowledge the film’s existence, and I would urge any interested viewers to do the same.

The reason there has been so much emphasis on how the film was made is because it’s a much more interesting topic than the value of the film itself. I’m not completely adverse to the idea of a horror film set inside a Disney theme park. If done properly, I could see that being a really fun idea. In fact, it has been done properly, in a short film called Missing In The Mansion (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0M-yetCGm-A), which explores some of the more sordid Disney lore in a playful way. Even though I am someone who grew up with Disney vacations and still enjoy going to this day, I can sympathize with the idea that there is something inherently creepy about the “Happiest Place On Earth.” But Escape From Tomorrow forgoes any kind of invention in favor of cheap exploitation and obnoxious snobbery. I was reminded of the moment I lost patience with the Banksy film Exit Through The Gift Shop, when the notorious street artist went into Disneyland and set up an inflatable doll of a Guantanamo inmate, sparking panic in the process. My feeling both then and now is that subversive graffiti art is one thing, displaying an image with associations to terrorism in a highly-populated vacation destination is something else entirely. I felt there was a level of mocking derision directed at something that’s never particularly warranted it, and there is an element of that in Escape From Tomorrow. And because Moore’s film isn’t involving in either its construction or its commentary, that “let’s thumb our noses from atop our mighty throne” feeling takes center stage and never exits. My advice is to skip this completely; go watch Westworld instead, or the “Itchy & Scratchy Land” episode of The Simpsons. They make similar points, only with a sense of wit and ability that is almost completely absent here. 2/10.


Yikes. I was going to rent this off of iTunes last weekend but hesitated, and after reading your post I'm glad I waited.

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