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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
Pacific Rim
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1663662/
Giant dinosaurs ravaging cities. Been there: Godzilla.
Giant robots ravaging cities. Been there, done that: Transformers.
Hackneyed script, with cardboard characters obsessed with a "we must save the world or die trying" mandate. Been there, done that, bought the t-shirt: Armageddon.
Pacific Rim is all of that but preciously little else. Originality is certainly not this film's strong point, if indeed there is one (I don't count "blowing shit up real good" in numerous literally indistinguishable battle scenes as a strong point). The premise of the story of building giant robots to fight giant dinosaurs in hand to hand combat makes no sense whatsoever, given that these creatures could be trivially taken out with laser guided bunker busters at 40,000 feet with no risk of retaliation.
The hero, Charlie Hunnam, shows zero range, basically reprising his Son's of Anarchy persona, right down to the "I'm so cool it hurts" slurry dialogue and ridiculous swaggering gait. Incidentally, another Son's regular, Ron Perlman, plays a supporting role.
I was frankly in a state of disbelief for most of this movie's overlong 2:11 running length, given my high levels of respect and enjoyment of director Guillermo del Toro previous efforts. This is absolutely not an example of his best work.
5.5/10.


You didn't like the quirky little touches? Newton's cradles and Ron Perlman's shoes and Charlie Day's enthusiasm? I agree it's a bit too derivative, but there were lots of little moments to treasure

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Sun Oct 13, 2013 11:45 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
You didn't like the quirky little touches? Newton's cradles and Ron Perlman's shoes and Charlie Day's enthusiasm? I agree it's a bit too derivative, but there were lots of little moments to treasure

They were of the blink and you miss it variety. I forgot to mention the unbelievably clichéd eccentric wacky "scientists" in Pacific Rim. Why can't we have proper scientists doing proper science in our media? I guess it started with Back to the Future (Christopher Lloyd) and now you see it constantly in film and TV whenever a scientist is required: Fringe (John Noble), NCIS (Pauley Perrette) Big Bang Theory etc. No wonder no one wants to do science anymore - you apparently have to be (or will become) a wacky nutjob! As a scientist, it's getting seriously old now.


Last edited by nitrium on Sun Oct 13, 2013 3:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.



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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Patlabor: The Movie is based on an anime and manga about a mobile police force. It is set in 1999 (ten years in the future when the film was made) and Japan has developed giant robots capable of being operated by humans, or, as they discover, can operate independently. These are being used to create islands in Tokyo Bay, something called the Babylon Project. (Actually, I got the impression that all of Tokyo Bay was to be filled in, which seems like a stupid idea since Yokohama's a major seaport.) However, someone has infected the robots' operating system with a virus which causes them to free themselves from their operators' control and go berserk. The virus is triggered by infrasonic vibrations. Now there is a typhoon heading toward Tokyo that will produce enough infrasonic to set off all 8000+ robots.

Amazingly, for a movie in which thousands of robots go berserk, this is a dull film with uninteresting characters, except for those characters who are truly irritating. (One of the police officers seems to have the maturity of a ten-year-old.) Animation isn't anything special; this is before Miyazaki upgraded Japanese animation. Del Toro claims it as an influence on Pacific Rim. (3 of 10; it was a struggle to get through.)

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
You didn't like the quirky little touches? Newton's cradles and Ron Perlman's shoes and Charlie Day's enthusiasm? I agree it's a bit too derivative, but there were lots of little moments to treasure

They were of the blink and you miss it variety. I forgot to mention the unbelievably clichéd eccentric wacky "scientists" in Pacific Rim. Why can't we have proper scientists doing proper science in our media? I guess it started with Back to the Future (Christopher Lloyd) and now you see it constantly in film and TV whenever a scientist is required: Fringe (John Noble), NCIS (Pauley Perrette) Big Bang Theory etc. No wonder no one wants to do science anymore - you apparently have to be (or will become) a wacky nutjob! As a scientist, it's getting seriously old now.

I feel the opposite, for me characters like that actually make science more interesting, BTW Pauly Perrette actually does have background in criminology, so she is a legitimate scientist. I did find the wacky scientists in PR to be a too over-the-top though, they had some sorta funny moments. Personally I thought PR was an OK film, good but not as amazing as critics made it out to be, quite honestly I prefer the Transformers films.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
At least we don't have so much of the previous scientist stereotype anymore--the dispassionate machinelike man in the white coat invariably examining a test tube through impenetrable glasses.

Flash fact: scientists are regular people. Sure, they're smarter, have cooler jobs, and probably have a much larger collection of esoteric nerd memorabilia, but still... they like to fart around as much as anybody else.

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Ken wrote:
Flash fact: scientists are regular people. Sure, they're smarter, have cooler jobs, and probably have a much larger collection of esoteric nerd memorabilia, but still... they like to fart around as much as anybody else.

Exactly, but we are mostly not near crazy. The "scientists" in film and TV generally appear to have recently escaped from insane asylums.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Captain Phillips

My wife wanted to see this and I went with her. It is a decent thriller, with the expected amount of pro-USA cheats beating, but director Greengrass does stop here and there to show glimmers of the desperation that is ever- present in Somali society. Overall, not bad.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Exorcist Even though I've always considered this film one of the greatest horror films out there, I actually hadn't seen it in probably ten years or more. This morning I decided to revisit it, and man, does it ever hold up. After 40 years, the film still remains a disturbingly effective film. I admired how Friedkin takes his time to build everything and doesn't rush into things. Plus, all the performances were top-notch, particularly Burstyn, Miller, and Von Sydow. Blair had one or two spotty lines near the beginning, but that would be nitpicking. Kudos to her for tackling this challenging role at such a young age. Truth of the matter is that, even with all the years and all the advances, and with so many Exorcist films after that, not a single one can touch this one. Grade: A

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Byzantium (2013)

Its disparate elements coupled with some awkward dialogue in the first half don't gel for me at first, but by the end this is one of the better vampire stories I've seen. The direction by Neil Jordan is superb and atmospheric as usual. Gemma Arterton is a revelation in the role that suited her alluring presence perfectly, while Saoirse Ronan gives a great performance that may be my favorite of her yet. A haunting and beautiful film. 8.5/10

The Devil's Backbone (2001)

More a supernatural coming-of-age drama than horror, the film feels at times like the prototype for the great Pan's Labyrinth, which has many of the same elements but executes them far better for me. Still, it is a tender, soulful story told well, with Del Toro's visual enhancing it considerably. 8/10

The Body Snatcher (1945)

The story doesn't grab me all the way, but the film benefits greatly from Robert Wise's crisp direction and some very chilling scenes (the one where the singing girl disappeared into the darkness being a standout). Boris Karloff is committed and memorable as the villain. 7.5/10


Mon Oct 14, 2013 12:36 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
peng wrote:


The Devil's Backbone (2001)

More a supernatural coming-of-age drama than horror, the film feels at times like the prototype for the great Pan's Labyrinth, which has many of the same elements but executes them far better for me. Still, it is a tender, soulful story told well, with Del Toro's visual enhancing it considerably. 8/10



We had a pretty good discussion about this some years ago:

http://reelviews.net/reelviewsforum/viewtopic.php?f=27&t=2531&start=0&hilit=the+devil+s+backbone

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Birth - Letting go of the past can be a difficult process. Ten years after the death of her late husband Sean, Anna (a pixie-haired Nicole Kidman) is engaged to a respectable businessman and seems ready to finally move on from the tragedy in her past. But then the past comes back to her in the form of a ten-year-old boy, who claims to be her dead husband. Anna and her fiancé brush off his behavior at first, but the boy is persistent, and knows certain private information that he should have no way of knowing. As his claims and actions continue to carry more and more weight, Anna is forced to make a decision: reject the boy’s affections and move on with her life, or risk abandoning everything to stay with the reincarnation of her true love. Along the way, this 2004 film from director Jonathan Glazer keeps raising tantalizing questions. Is Sean truly Anna’s dead husband reincarnate, or is it all just an elaborate trick? If he is telling the truth, was he always conscious of that truth, or was there a sudden moment of revelation (when his mother starts up an elaborate bedtime ritual, he dismisses her by saying “I’m not your stupid boy anymore.”)? How could this boy really be Sean, when Sean openly rejected such possibilities when he was alive? And how come he doesn’t remember his secret affair with another woman (Anne Heche)?

They are interesting questions to consider, but Glazer, in his second feature film after the considerably more dialogue-heavy Sexy Beast, doesn’t seem all that concerned with providing answers. That refusal to include any explanations is what separates Birth from more conventional fare, and I can just picture how easily this film could have been transformed into something less special. It would have been a horror story, with a creepy kid insidiously worming his way into the lives of respectable people, and the whole thing would have ended in violence. It certainly wouldn’t have had the strange appeal of Glazer’s film, which plays out instead almost like a dark fairytale, with the boy becoming something of a literal manifestation of one woman’s hesitancy to let go. And it wouldn’t have kept those lingering questions open for the viewer to consider. But they are questions that really can’t be answered in any definitive way, and I’m happy the film decided to keep them mysterious. 9/10.

This Is The End - Sometimes I wonder if there's something off about my sense of humor. I know I have one, but it's one that doesn't seem to align very well with many of the so-called "comedies" released in recent years. Case in point: this apocalyptic outing from the writing team of Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, here also making their directing debut. It opens innocuously enough, with the arrival of Jay Baruchel into Los Angeles to spend some time with his buddy Seth Rogen (everyone in the film plays themselves). Baruchel isn't a fan of the L.A. lifestyle, an attitude Rogen hopes to change by dragging him to a big party at James Franco's new house. After about 15 minutes of celebrity cameos, all hell breaks loose, quite literally. The blessed are beamed up into the sky, and the sinners (including Jonah Hill, Craig Robinson, and Danny McBride, along with Baruchel, Rogen, and Franco) are left on Earth to scramble to survive and do battle with the forces of Hell.

Despite never much caring for anyone involved in this production, I went into it optimistic, hoping the premise would inspire something a little more adventurous than normal. There are certainly laughs to be had here, particularly in the celebrity satire that makes up the first 30 minutes (even though it's nowhere near as sharp or fun as 2008's Tropic Thunder). But it doesn't take long for everyone to reach back into their bottomless grab bag of dick and weed jokes. Very little is done with the "actors playing themselves" conceit; essentially, everyone gets one defining trait to run into the ground. Franco has an obvious crush on Rogen, Hill is overly eager to please, McBride is loud and obnoxious (big stretch there), and so on. For every pointed one-liner, there are ten more that fall completely flat, and at a certain point the comedy just devolves into people shouting at each other. The entire thing feels like a bunch of buddies spending a weekend riffing with each other, consistency and coherency be damned. While that kind of thing can be amusing up to the point, all this overly-chummy, lightly self-deprecating backslapping between people who think they're much more clever than they actually are gets tiring quickly. I realize plenty of people find these guys incredibly funny, but I'm just left pondering how many times they can make the same movie before everyone realizes they really don't have much else to offer. 4/10.

Autumn Sonata - An invitation from a daughter to her estranged mother sets in motion the events that make up this 1978 film from Ingmar Bergman. Eva, who lives in the country with her husband Viktor and her severely-disabled sister Helena, has not seen her mother Charlotte for seven years. Charlotte leads a busy life as a concert pianist, but there is the sense that there are other reasons why she has remained separate from her family for so long. Upon her arrival to the country home, Charlotte is greeted by Eva in a friendly manner. But it doesn’t take long for all their pent-up hostilities to come flooding out, culminating in one emotional evening, at the end of which the relationship between the two women might be forever scarred. In its confrontation between two women, the film brought to mind Bergman’s Persona (a piano piece played individually by both mother and daughter recalls that earlier film’s famous monologue repetition). But Autumn Sonata is less opaque, its main intention to explore the nature of rifts that can form between family members over the course of decades.

For both its director and lead star, the making of Autumn Sonata was a very personal ordeal. For Ingmar Bergman, the film was an opportunity to explore some of the conflicting emotions he felt towards his parents and his upbringing. Even though the main confrontation in the film is between two women, there are definite parallels to be drawn between Eva’s misgivings and Bergman’s. For Ingrid Bergman, it was to be her last feature film appearance. Terminally ill with cancer during the film’s production, she saw echoes in the role of the frequently-absent mother of her absences from her own children. As a director, Ingmar Bergman was a master at these kind of intimate chamber pieces, and in Ingrid Bergman and Liv Ullmann, he had two of the best actors to voice his material. Strangely though, I find myself most drawn to the character of Eva’s husband, Viktor, played by Halvar Björk. Although a minor character, he is the one who introduces the situation at the beginning, breaking the fourth wall to bring the viewer into the film’s world. Much like the viewer, he senses the inevitable clash that will occur between the two women, but he is only able to observe from a distance. He understands like the viewer that, even though the results might be painful, there needs to be an airing out of grievances. One gets the sense that Ingmar and Ingrid Bergman had a similar goal in mind when making the film. 8/10.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blonde Almond wrote:
This Is The End - Sometimes I wonder if there's something off about my sense of humor. I know I have one, but it's one that doesn't seem to align very well with many of the so-called "comedies" released in recent years. Case in point: this apocalyptic outing from the writing team of Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, here also making their directing debut.
Despite never much caring for anyone involved in this production, I went into it optimistic, hoping the premise would inspire something a little more adventurous than normal. The entire thing feels like a bunch of buddies spending a weekend riffing with each other, consistency and coherency be damned. While that kind of thing can be amusing up to the point, all this overly-chummy, lightly self-deprecating backslapping between people who think they're much more clever than they actually are gets tiring quickly. I realize plenty of people find these guys incredibly funny, but I'm just left pondering how many times they can make the same movie before everyone realizes they really don't have much else to offer. 4/10.

I for one, am in complete agreement with your views here. Didn't enjoy much of what was on screen at all. Possibly the worst comedy I have seen this year.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
Blonde Almond wrote:
This Is The End - Sometimes I wonder if there's something off about my sense of humor. I know I have one, but it's one that doesn't seem to align very well with many of the so-called "comedies" released in recent years. Case in point: this apocalyptic outing from the writing team of Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, here also making their directing debut.
Despite never much caring for anyone involved in this production, I went into it optimistic, hoping the premise would inspire something a little more adventurous than normal. The entire thing feels like a bunch of buddies spending a weekend riffing with each other, consistency and coherency be damned. While that kind of thing can be amusing up to the point, all this overly-chummy, lightly self-deprecating backslapping between people who think they're much more clever than they actually are gets tiring quickly. I realize plenty of people find these guys incredibly funny, but I'm just left pondering how many times they can make the same movie before everyone realizes they really don't have much else to offer. 4/10.

I for one, am in complete agreement with your views here. Didn't enjoy much of what was on screen at all. Possibly the worst comedy I have seen this year.

I thought it was OK and funny in parts, but definitely not as good as some critics made it out to be, for me both The Heat and We're The Millers were much funnier (and less low-brow) comedies.

Another comedy film this year that I found overrated was The World's End, it was considerable step down from Hot Fuzz. Compared to that film the jokes were much more hit and miss, the attempts at drama with Gary were really poor and unconvincing, and the ending and epilogue didn't seem to fit in well with the rest of the film at all.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
Blonde Almond wrote:
This Is The End - Sometimes I wonder if there's something off about my sense of humor. I know I have one, but it's one that doesn't seem to align very well with many of the so-called "comedies" released in recent years. Case in point: this apocalyptic outing from the writing team of Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, here also making their directing debut.
Despite never much caring for anyone involved in this production, I went into it optimistic, hoping the premise would inspire something a little more adventurous than normal. The entire thing feels like a bunch of buddies spending a weekend riffing with each other, consistency and coherency be damned. While that kind of thing can be amusing up to the point, all this overly-chummy, lightly self-deprecating backslapping between people who think they're much more clever than they actually are gets tiring quickly. I realize plenty of people find these guys incredibly funny, but I'm just left pondering how many times they can make the same movie before everyone realizes they really don't have much else to offer. 4/10.

I for one, am in complete agreement with your views here. Didn't enjoy much of what was on screen at all. Possibly the worst comedy I have seen this year.


I enjoyed it immensely. But I'd be highly selective in my recommendation of it. One person's Dumb and Dumber is another's ...Holy Grail and vice-versa.

Comedy is such a funny thing.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blonde Almond wrote:
Birth - Letting go of the past can be a difficult process. Ten years after the death of her late husband Sean, Anna (a pixie-haired Nicole Kidman) is engaged to a respectable businessman and seems ready to finally move on from the tragedy in her past. But then the past comes back to her in the form of a ten-year-old boy, who claims to be her dead husband. Anna and her fiancé brush off his behavior at first, but the boy is persistent, and knows certain private information that he should have no way of knowing. As his claims and actions continue to carry more and more weight, Anna is forced to make a decision: reject the boy’s affections and move on with her life, or risk abandoning everything to stay with the reincarnation of her true love. Along the way, this 2004 film from director Jonathan Glazer keeps raising tantalizing questions. Is Sean truly Anna’s dead husband reincarnate, or is it all just an elaborate trick? If he is telling the truth, was he always conscious of that truth, or was there a sudden moment of revelation (when his mother starts up an elaborate bedtime ritual, he dismisses her by saying “I’m not your stupid boy anymore.”)? How could this boy really be Sean, when Sean openly rejected such possibilities when he was alive? And how come he doesn’t remember his secret affair with another woman (Anne Heche)?

They are interesting questions to consider, but Glazer, in his second feature film after the considerably more dialogue-heavy Sexy Beast, doesn’t seem all that concerned with providing answers. That refusal to include any explanations is what separates Birth from more conventional fare, and I can just picture how easily this film could have been transformed into something less special. It would have been a horror story, with a creepy kid insidiously worming his way into the lives of respectable people, and the whole thing would have ended in violence. It certainly wouldn’t have had the strange appeal of Glazer’s film, which plays out instead almost like a dark fairytale, with the boy becoming something of a literal manifestation of one woman’s hesitancy to let go. And it wouldn’t have kept those lingering questions open for the viewer to consider. But they are questions that really can’t be answered in any definitive way, and I’m happy the film decided to keep them mysterious. 9/10.


I've been picking and dropping this film at video rentals for years. I might have to check it out one of these days.

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This Is The End - Sometimes I wonder if there's something off about my sense of humor. I know I have one, but it's one that doesn't seem to align very well with many of the so-called "comedies" released in recent years. Case in point: this apocalyptic outing from the writing team of Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, here also making their directing debut. It opens innocuously enough, with the arrival of Jay Baruchel into Los Angeles to spend some time with his buddy Seth Rogen (everyone in the film plays themselves). Baruchel isn't a fan of the L.A. lifestyle, an attitude Rogen hopes to change by dragging him to a big party at James Franco's new house. After about 15 minutes of celebrity cameos, all hell breaks loose, quite literally. The blessed are beamed up into the sky, and the sinners (including Jonah Hill, Craig Robinson, and Danny McBride, along with Baruchel, Rogen, and Franco) are left on Earth to scramble to survive and do battle with the forces of Hell.


A 4/10 is about what I would give it as well. I would just say again that it seems more concerned with loud musical montages and special effects than with humor.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Gravity I've already talked about this in other threads, but suffice to say it is the most excited I've ever been in a theater. All of the cliched descriptions apply: "Edge of My seat," "Thrill ride," "powerful, etc, etc." I can't compare this to the other movies I'm listing however, because this movie will lose something, maybe A LOT, when viewed on a normal living room tv. And I'm not referring to what some have called a simple plot. I actually think the plot is very powerful; albeit a person not giving up no matter what in face of such impending death is a very powerful thing, at least to me. I just mean the scope of the film. But I think Cuaron made this to bring the magic back to the theater, and he succeeded immensely. Upon viewing this in IMAX 3D, 10/10.

Prisoners A very powerful, complex, deep, deep movie, filled with complex imagery and symbolism. I need to watch it again to catch every little nuance, but I felt this was a masterfully told story that will stand up to multiple repeat viewings. 9.5/10.

Captain Phillips Tom Hanks best performance since Cast Away, and another thrilling movie at that. The story unfolds at just the right pace, and the tension at the end is almost unbearable. I also applaud Greengrass for attempting to give the pirates, especially Muse, humanity.
[Reveal] Spoiler:
in the end, when Muse asks where are my friends and he gets taken down, and the Navy officer says your friends are dead, I didn't celebrate, I actually felt sorry for muse
. That first time actor did a masterful job, and held his own to Hanks.

Also, I know a lot of the crew have multiple problems with the way Phillips was portrayed (as a sacrificing hero), but I can't judge the movie on real life scenarios. As a movie, it is one of the best of the year. 9/10.

Rush A good biopic on two characters about a sport I know next to nothing about. It was interesting to see two people take completely different approaches and yet both excel in different ways. The race scenes were well done, and I've heard the character who played Nikki Lauda got him almost exactly right, and deserves a best supporting nod. It was a good time. 7/10.

Mud This movie just hit all of the right notes for me. I loved the tom sawyer references, and appreciate that this was told from the perspective of a kid. He saw this grand story open up before his eyes, and couldn't come to terms with the (adult problems) that were actually present. Mcconaughey gave maybe the best performance of his career, and I loved seeing Sam Shepard in his role as well. 9/10.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Collateral

I can't remember what prompted me to rewatch this, but it was on my list. The last time I saw it was its theatrical run. My recollection of it was that it was Tom Cruise blowing people away and dragging Jamie Foxx around with him.

A strange thing happened during the rewatch. My impression of it most of the way through was that it was a tight-knit, small scale thriller, cool as a cucumber and with just enough characterization to make it more compelling than a mere technical exercise. Then, as with so many reasonably intelligent movies, its seams started to show during the third act--the clockwork of the narrative structure started to peek through. The movie was pushing my suspension of disbelief with one or two improbabilities too many.

That's pretty much the death knell for my investment in a movie, and, I assume, for just about anybody else's. I understand that part of the art of narrative filmmaking is that the storytellers want the stuff that happens earlier in the movie to have a poetic payoff later on. Making the whole movie of a piece and presenting it as a unified composition is one of the great pleasures to be had in storytelling, but it's also a precarious balancing act. The line between irony and unacceptable contrivance is razor-thin. The movie blew it and it lost me.

Then, in the final scene, the strange thing happened: I reinvested. The movie won me back. How often does that happen? The sequence is like something out of Hitchcock--a subtly excellent piece of suspense-thriller moviemaking. I found myself involved again, actually much more than I had been before the movie went briefly off the rails. That's a good metaphor, because what Collateral pulled off with me was as unlikely as a train going off the rails and getting safely back on them again.

Anyway, great movie.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
God Bless America

Bobcat Goldthwait's film may be the most uncompromising satire I've seen in a while.

The comparison to Falling Down is spot on. If that movie was a story of what happens when one realizes that the American Dream is likely to remain just that, this one is a blast against the corruption of it, the transition away from work hard and be a good person to one of entitlement and it's a dream to be famous just for being famous.

I can't say for sure if the lead character is a proxy for Goldthwait or if just a microcosm for a lot of pissed off people. But his anger is definitely understandable, his on-going rant against a society where civility seems to be a thing of the past is spot-on.

The ending is similar to Bonnie And Clyde in a few regards. But in some ways, this may be the most effective of a group of recent films (Pain And Gain, Spring Breakers, The Bling Ring) that rant against societal devolution into a pile of BS.

***

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Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:18 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Jeff Wilder wrote:
God Bless America

Bobcat Goldthwait's film may be the most uncompromising satire I've seen in a while.

The comparison to Falling Down is spot on. If that movie was a story of what happens when one realizes that the American Dream is likely to remain just that, this one is a blast against the corruption of it, the transition away from work hard and be a good person to one of entitlement and it's a dream to be famous just for being famous.

I can't say for sure if the lead character is a proxy for Goldthwait or if just a microcosm for a lot of pissed off people. But his anger is definitely understandable, his on-going rant against a society where civility seems to be a thing of the past is spot-on.

The ending is similar to Bonnie And Clyde in a few regards. But in some ways, this may be the most effective of a group of recent films (Pain And Gain, Spring Breakers, The Bling Ring) that rant against societal devolution into a pile of BS.

***

For me that film was not very effective as satire because I did not find the lead characters sympathetic in the least, while I could understand some of Goldwaithe's points, at times it just seemed like he was blindly ranting about how much this generation sucks without really going into more detail as to why. killing a girl just for being spoiled and shooting someone just for talking in a movie theater just comes across as petty and disturbing(the movie theater scene especially after Aurora) and largely undermines his point about social devolution since the lead characters are arguably just as if not moreso screwed up then all the people they claim to hate so much, the ending was especially bad, learning that
[Reveal] Spoiler:
Roxy and Frank don't even have freudian excuses for their actions(Frank not having cancer and Roxy having a normal family) so i'm supposed to cheer for them shooting up a talent show? Yeah I don't think so
Personally I think all of those films you mentioned were much more effective then this film was, because they felt much less heavy-handed and over-the-top adn they made their points in a much lless contrived and half-assed manner. I pretty much agree with Roger Ebert's review on the film.


Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:28 pm
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