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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
MGamesCook wrote:
The Grandmaster by Kar Wai Wong Kar Wai

The action is astonishing and Ziyi Zhang is one of the most gorgeous women alive, for my money. Cut down for an American audience, some of the plot strands are indeed underdeveloped. It ends up being an exercise in pure aesthetics. And it's a terrific aesthetic, but I want to see the longer version.


Is it as visually "messy" as 'Ashes of Time' (of which I've only seen the "Redux" version)?


Mon Sep 02, 2013 12:27 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blue Jasmine (2013) 3.5/4

I don’t want to sound like a broken record; many of you have already commented on the film and it’s qualities—rightfully projecting praise towards Cate Blanchett. While I loved Blanchett’s turn as a broken, high-end housewife, I reveled in the return of “dark” Woody Allen. It’s been a while since we’ve seen Allen play with characters that seem like mirrors of our specific time period in society. Midnight, while an arguably great film, never constructed any hard-hitting truths about the current state of the world, essentially more whimsical and witty than reflective. However with Blue Jasmine, Allen crafts a film that is not only a pretty fantastic character study, but also a brilliant examination of our over-indulged, reluctant lifestyles.

Similar to the clever themes of morality demonstrated in works such as Crimes and Misdemeanors and Match Point, Blue Jasmine allows viewers to peer inside the lives of individuals who have made, lets say, interesting choices to protect their own livelihoods. However Blue Jasmine puts a spin on this familiar Allen trope. The deeds have already been done; the main characters involvement is vague. Blue Jasmine is special, not only because it looks at the aftermath of a series of events instead of simply watching them unfold, but because it breaks the bonds of simple characterization. This is a film where we experience the true mental decay of a human being. It’s not pretty, but it’s bold. I’m a fan of Woody Allen’s humor, but its here in the recesses of human emotion and pain, where Allen is truly masterful.

The Worlds End (2013) 3/4

Edgar Wright’s latest Pegg/Frost adventure begins where other Speilbergian efforts wistfully end. It takes a while for this film to really get going. A good chunk of time is set-aside in the first act to familiarize us with a band of main characters. Yes this is needed, but it doesn’t excuse it from nagging pacing issues along the way. Once The World’s End enters a pub restroom most of the preceding slowness wears off, and good bits of humor and action take precedent. Overall, The World’s End is a fresh breath of air in a mostly stale summer film climate, but I have to say that I expected a bit more.

Ain’t Them Bodies Saints (2013) 3.5/4

Some of the year’s best films have been rooted in the themes and meanings of fatherhood. Place Beyond The Pines presented an epic tale of two separate individuals weaved together into an ambitious piece of cinema that examined the age-old conundrum of “sins of the father.” While Sarah Polley’s Stories We Tell, concentrated on the hushed truths in our own lives; the stories that we all know, the ones that don’t seem relevant or important. yet cast a great deal of understanding on where we come from and who we are. David Lowery’s Aint Them Bodies Saints echoes many of these themes while embracing a quiet, softened sentiment towards fractured love and weary promises. Cinematographer Bradford Young captures a dreamy landscape to cradle our characters in—a visual, poetic aesthetic that resembles the work of Malick’s Bandlands and Days of Heaven. Yet blind criticism towards ATBS has been fueled by these similarities. Lowery’s debut film may harness a visible familiarity to the works of other directors, but the narrative, as simple as it may be, is wrought with an emotional depth that arguably trumps anything aforementioned.

The Spectacular Now (2013) 3.5/4

It’s refreshing to see a film about the recklessness of young love. A film that’s more concerned with an elevated sense of reality, and less concentrated on the formulaic constructs of the standard Hollywood romance. Like this year’s Frances Ha, The Spectacular Now tackles the angst and possible dread of moving forward in life to a place that’s not so comfortable and typical. There’s a prior relationship here that gets a tad daunting, but it never takes away from the film’s always-present, life-like pulse. This is a film that gets young love. It understands teenage mentality. But most importantly it feels authentic.

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Mon Sep 02, 2013 4:35 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JackBurns wrote:
Blue Jasmine (2013) 3.5/4

I don’t want to sound like a broken record; many of you have already commented on the film and it’s qualities—rightfully projecting praise towards Cate Blanchett. While I loved Blanchett’s turn as a broken, high-end housewife, I reveled in the return of “dark” Woody Allen. It’s been a while since we’ve seen Allen play with characters that seem like mirrors of our specific time period in society. Midnight, while an arguably great film, never constructed any hard-hitting truths about the current state of the world, essentially more whimsical and witty than reflective. However with Blue Jasmine, Allen crafts a film that is not only a pretty fantastic character study, but also a brilliant examination of our over-indulged, reluctant lifestyles.

Similar to the clever themes of morality demonstrated in works such as Crimes and Misdemeanors and Match Point, Blue Jasmine allows viewers to peer inside the lives of individuals who have made, lets say, interesting choices to protect their own livelihoods. However Blue Jasmine puts a spin on this familiar Allen trope. The deeds have already been done; the main characters involvement is vague. Blue Jasmine is special, not only because it looks at the aftermath of a series of events instead of simply watching them unfold, but because it breaks the bonds of simple characterization. This is a film where we experience the true mental decay of a human being. It’s not pretty, but it’s bold. I’m a fan of Woody Allen’s humor, but its here in the recesses of human emotion and pain, where Allen is truly masterful.

The Worlds End (2013) 3/4

Edgar Wright’s latest Pegg/Frost adventure begins where other Speilbergian efforts wistfully end. It takes a while for this film to really get going. A good chunk of time is set-aside in the first act to familiarize us with a band of main characters. Yes this is needed, but it doesn’t excuse it from nagging pacing issues along the way. Once The World’s End enters a pub restroom most of the preceding slowness wears off, and good bits of humor and action take precedent. Overall, The World’s End is a fresh breath of air in a mostly stale summer film climate, but I have to say that I expected a bit more.

Ain’t Them Bodies Saints (2013) 3.5/4

Some of the year’s best films have been rooted in the themes and meanings of fatherhood. Place Beyond The Pines presented an epic tale of two separate individuals weaved together into an ambitious piece of cinema that examined the age-old conundrum of “sins of the father.” While Sarah Polley’s Stories We Tell, concentrated on the hushed truths in our own lives; the stories that we all know, the ones that don’t seem relevant or important. yet cast a great deal of understanding on where we come from and who we are. David Lowery’s Aint Them Bodies Saints echoes many of these themes while embracing a quiet, softened sentiment towards fractured love and weary promises. Cinematographer Bradford Young captures a dreamy landscape to cradle our characters in—a visual, poetic aesthetic that resembles the work of Malick’s Bandlands and Days of Heaven. Yet blind criticism towards ATBS has been fueled by these similarities. Lowery’s debut film may harness a visible familiarity to the works of other directors, but the narrative, as simple as it may be, is wrought with an emotional depth that arguably trumps anything aforementioned.

The Spectacular Now (2013) 3.5/4

It’s refreshing to see a film about the recklessness of young love. A film that’s more concerned with an elevated sense of reality, and less concentrated on the formulaic constructs of the standard Hollywood romance. Like this year’s Frances Ha, The Spectacular Now tackles the angst and possible dread of moving forward in life to a place that’s not so comfortable and typical. There’s a prior relationship here that gets a tad daunting, but it never takes away from the film’s always-present, life-like pulse. This is a film that gets young love. It understands teenage mentality. But most importantly it feels authentic.


Sounds like a great weekend for you. Gotta see some of these

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Mon Sep 02, 2013 4:38 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
Sounds like a great weekend for you. Gotta see some of these


It was dude. Seeing solid films always brightens up the weekend. And you must see Ain't Them Bodies Saints and The Spectacular Now at some point.

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Mon Sep 02, 2013 4:54 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Quote:
The Worlds End (2013) 3/4

Edgar Wright’s latest Pegg/Frost adventure begins where other Speilbergian efforts wistfully end. It takes a while for this film to really get going. A good chunk of time is set-aside in the first act to familiarize us with a band of main characters. Yes this is needed, but it doesn’t excuse it from nagging pacing issues along the way. Once The World’s End enters a pub restroom most of the preceding slowness wears off, and good bits of humor and action take precedent. Overall, The World’s End is a fresh breath of air in a mostly stale summer film climate, but I have to say that I expected a bit more.


The Bill Nighy part is a blunt misstep, but mainly because it goes on for too long.

Quote:
Is it as visually "messy" as 'Ashes of Time' (of which I've only seen the "Redux" version)?


Haven't seen that one. But compared to the Wong movies I've seen, I would say it's definitely a lot cleaner than Blueberry Nights and 2046. The action is very slick. The shorter cut is really a remarkable balance of punchy action mixed with meditative romanticism. Overall, the movie feels like an attempt at two things: Wong trying his hand at intense action, and making his tragic romanticism more accessible. 2046 is one of the most depressing movies I've ever seen. Grandmaster kind of includes some of that unrequited love/loneliness theme, but in a very minimal and understated way.

Quote:
The Incredible Burt Wonderstone (2013)
Egotistic Burt Wonderstone (Steve Carell) and his partner Anton Marvelton (Steve Buscemi) are a pair of famous magicians performing their routine and stale show in Doug Munny’s (James Gandolfini) Las Vegas casino. The outrageous stunts by self-harming “street magician” Steve Gray (Jim Carrey) make their show look even more worn, so they try to outdo Gray by performing a spectacular illusion as well, resulting in disaster.
I’ll admit that David Copperfield-like magicians and their costumes and antics make for an easy target and that this film doesn’t even do a brilliant job of mocking them. I also concede that the plot is very lazy and that you’ll have seen very similar stories in a different setting. That being said, I have to judge a comedy on the basis of whether I thought it was funny and I laughed a lot during this movie, particularly during the hilarious credits sequence. Also, Jim Carrey is fantastic in a role which is quite different from his earlier zany comedies (not my cup of tea). Overall, I think it’s a good comedy without being anything special. 7/10


Glad to see a nod to this one. Some good laughs, and I liked the overall pace of it. The opening transition from childhood to adulthood is really well done. Main thing is there's too much Carell, not enough Carrey.


Tue Sep 03, 2013 2:31 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Red Shoes (1948)

Great classic film. It engages you instantly with its energy (young people enthusiastically almost stepping on each other to see a ballet) and sumptuous Technicolor. I would say though that the actual storyline is quite simplistic, not bad but just decent, which *almost* becomes a bit too thin over 2 hours (stunning ending though). The titular dance in the middle of the film, however, is amazing. The color, the movement, the story, and the touches of (often dark) fantasy combine to create an utterly mesmerizing tale. As for the performances, their over-the-top nature are for the most part entertaining, but only Anton Walbrook, as a charismatic tyrant, gives a great one. 9/10


Tue Sep 03, 2013 10:13 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Trip (2010)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1740047/
If the idea of a mockumentary (in the style of The Office or Christopher Guest films) about two British C-listers (Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing fictionalised versions of themselves) doing excruciating unfunny overlong impersonations of Michael Caine, Al Pacino and Sean Connery (amongst others) sounds like a winning formula, then this is a film for you. In fairness they do also waffle on about nothing of interest, drive around, sing, and eat. Directed by Michael Winterbottom from a script he may well have found in Ricky Gervais' garbage.
5/10.


Tue Sep 03, 2013 4:49 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
The Trip (2010)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1740047/
If the idea of a mockumentary (in the style of The Office or Christopher Guest films) about two British C-listers (Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing fictionalised versions of themselves) doing excruciating unfunny overlong impersonations of Michael Caine, Al Pacino and Sean Connery (amongst others) sounds like a winning formula, then this is a film for you. In fairness they do also waffle on about nothing of interest, drive around, sing, and eat. Directed by Michael Winterbottom from a script he may well have found in Ricky Gervais' garbage.
5/10.


Oh my God you didn't like the Michael Caine scene? Welcome to your club of one. I haven't even seen the movie and I love that scene.

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Tue Sep 03, 2013 6:10 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
Oh my God you didn't like the Michael Caine scene? Welcome to your club of one. I haven't even seen the movie and I love that scene.

Nope. It wasn't funny, and it dragged on for far too long. Incidentally, they milk that exact same gag THREE times at least in separate scenes. I didn't find it funny the first time, so by the time they do it a third time, I was just about ready to bolt. The best scene in the film imo is the final one, where Winterbottom juxtaposes Brydon's happy family life with Coogan's lonely empty apartment.
Ricky Gervais/Stephen Merchant have a series called Life's Too Short (starring Warrick Davis as himself) that covers the same sort of territory as The Trip but does it a whole lot better (and funnier).


Tue Sep 03, 2013 11:17 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Haywire (2012)

I have watched this a few times now and I enjoy it more each time. The fights have a realistic feel and give the impression that someone might actually get hurt. Carano is a great physical presence, and I like the way she moves; strong, but still feminine. I'd welcome a sequel.


Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:17 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
My second trip into Kieslowski after trying The Decalogue six years ago and turning it off after two stories because it didn't connect with me. Either these are better or I gain more perspective.

Three Colors: Blue (1993)

The color motif is beautiful and haunting throughout, and really exemplify the theme of being engulfed by tragedy and trying to break free from the past. It's not a happy story, but certainly powerful. The mix of cinematography and music are compelling, and is Juliette Binoche whose face reveals deep pain under such a still facade. 8.5/10

Three Colors: White (1994)

Blue might be more powerful, but I like White a little more, mainly because of the most enjoyable protagonist in quite a while. I just rewatched City Lights recently, and Zbigniew Zamachowski had a similar blend of physical humor and pathos as Chaplin. He exudes so much likeability, and is a great anchor through this darkly comic romp (a luminous Julie Delpy is very underused though). The emotions on his face at the end are amazing and highly moving. 8.5/10


Wed Sep 04, 2013 11:48 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Kick-Ass 2 (2013)
The bloom is kind of off the rose with this one. It is competently shot and acted, but the story with its main theme of "should I be a superhero, should I not be a superhero, who am I really?" is a redux of the original as well as most superhero movies these days. Jim Carrey does a good job of not being Jim Carrey (i.e. he doesn't ham it up) as Col. Stars and Stripes. All-in-all I got the impression from the original that the inital installment was almost a labor of love from director Matthew Vaughn. While no masterpiece, the original was put together a lot better than the sequel, where Vaughn merely serves as producer. Kick-Ass 2 is fun in a lot of places, but not all that innovative. It also has one of the least satisfying "post-credit Easter eggs" I've seen in a while. 2.5 / 4.0

Goodfellas (1990)

Wife had never seen it. Scorcese's mobster masterpiece still holds up well 23 years later. The complete story needed to be told, but by the time the story gets into the 1980's it starts to feel like the movie's going a bit long. 3.5 / 4.0


Last edited by Johnny Larue on Thu Sep 05, 2013 4:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Wed Sep 04, 2013 2:24 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Johnny Larue wrote:
Goodfellas (1990)

Wife had never seen it. Scorcese's mobster masterpiece still holds up well 23 years later. The complete story needed to be told, but by the time the story gets into the 1980's it starts to feel like the movie's going a bit long. 3.5 / 4.0

I agree with this, but I think that was the point. The last part with Hill's arrest in the 80's may have been paced as it was by Scorsese precisely to show how Hill's life was aiming towards to the slow lane of anonymity after enjoying the lifestyle of a gangster. However, he also made sure to make clear the reason why Hill had to go into the slow lane as a way to show the audience that sometimes, being a normal schmuck isn't that bad (as compared to getting a bullet in the eye).

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Wed Sep 04, 2013 2:56 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Hick (2011)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1205558/
Chloë Grace Moretz (aka Hit Girl) basically carries this otherwise mediocre film about an unwanted 13 year old who runs away from a small town in Nebraska to find a better life in Las Vegas. Chloë Grace Moretz definitely shows a lot of promise based on her excellent acting work here (the next Jennifer Lawrence perhaps). Controversy surrounding a scene depicting the attempted rape of a 13 year old are unfounded imo, appropriately fitting within theme of the film. The 5% Rotten Tomatoes score and 5.5 rating on imdb make no sense to me - yes, the movie is pretty generic, but it's nonetheless a solid watch. Based on a novel by Andrea Portes who also wrote the screenplay.
7/10.


Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:45 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
peng wrote:
My second trip into Kieslowski after trying The Decalogue six years ago and turning it off after two stories because it didn't connect with me. Either these are better or I gain more perspective.

Three Colors: Blue (1993)

The color motif is beautiful and haunting throughout, and really exemplify the theme of being engulfed by tragedy and trying to break free from the past. It's not a happy story, but certainly powerful. The mix of cinematography and music are compelling, and is Juliette Binoche whose face reveals deep pain under such a still facade. 8.5/10

Three Colors: White (1994)

Blue might be more powerful, but I like White a little more, mainly because of the most enjoyable protagonist in quite a while. I just rewatched City Lights recently, and Zbigniew Zamachowski had a similar blend of physical humor and pathos as Chaplin. He exudes so much likeability, and is a great anchor through this darkly comic romp (a luminous Julie Delpy is very underused though). The emotions on his face at the end are amazing and highly moving. 8.5/10


I also like White more. I'm the only person in the world who likes White the best

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Wed Sep 04, 2013 8:32 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
I also like White more. I'm the only person in the world who likes White the best

No you're not. I'm sure you'll be pleased to know it is also my favourite in the series.


Last edited by nitrium on Wed Sep 04, 2013 10:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Wed Sep 04, 2013 10:07 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
I also like White more. I'm the only person in the world who likes White the best

No you're not. It is also my favourite in the series.


Woot!

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Wed Sep 04, 2013 10:08 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I'm going to watch Red today and see if I will join your little club.


Wed Sep 04, 2013 11:11 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
I also like White more. I'm the only person in the world who likes White the best


No, you're not. I like White the best and Red the least, which is the opposite of most people.

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Wed Sep 04, 2013 11:21 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Syd Henderson wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
I also like White more. I'm the only person in the world who likes White the best


No, you're not. I like White the best and Red the least, which is the opposite of most people.


Me too! OMG I'm not alone!

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Thu Sep 05, 2013 6:28 am
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