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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Sean wrote:
Blonde Almond wrote:
Berberian Sound Studio - It feels like I’m long overdue on seeing this one. British film critic Mark Kermode called it his favorite film of 2012, but it’s only just been given a release over here in the U.S., and a fairly paltry one at that. At least the wait was worth it. Toby Jones plays Gilderoy, a mild-mannered sound technician who finds himself working in an Italian studio on a Giallo horror film. Accustomed to more innocuous fare, Gilderoy doesn’t approve of the new material he is working on, resulting in some clashes of attitudes between himself and other members of the production crew (including the pretentious director who keeps insisting his work is art, in an attempt to excuse his own misogyny). As the post-production takes longer and longer to complete, and Gilderoy spends more and more time with the material, his psyche starts to fracture. The film is in part about the sense of personal worth someone can feel when involved with a project of questionable purpose. It’s also about the potential damaging effects of spending prolonged time with dark material; it isn’t much of a surprise when Gilderoy eventually starts having trouble distinguishing reality from fantasy, to the point where it appears his consciousness has somehow melded together with the film.

None of this material would be particularly memorable if Berberian Sound Studio was content to just ape past influences, generating meaning only through its associations with other works. What elevates the film above simple homage is director Peter Strickland’s unwillingness to fall back on the more predictable tropes of the films he references. He never shows onscreen any images from the incomplete Giallo film, instead placing all the emphasis on the sound design (one of the real pleasures of the film is watching the operations of the studio, and how non-violent objects are manipulated to create sounds of horrible violence). Unlike so many Giallo films, there is no overt violence, making it’s consistently-unsettling atmosphere all the more impressive. The soundtrack, from British experimental pop band Broadcast, is a key contributor as well, recreating many of the sounds from influential Giallo films while also working well as its own standalone piece. Overall, it’s an approach that bears more resemblance to the films of Polanski and Cronenberg than to Argento and Fulci and Bava, and it’s this approach that gives Berberian Sound Studio more staying power than what you’re likely to find in more commercial horror films. 9/10.

With Ebert gone, Kermode has quickly become my favorite critic, but didn't he say that A Royal Affair was his favorite movie of 2012?


I think it was a tie. He couldn't pick one over the other for the top spot, so he had two #1 films.

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Tue Jun 25, 2013 2:45 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blonde Almond wrote:
Berberian Sound Studio - It feels like I’m long overdue on seeing this one. British film critic Mark Kermode called it his favorite film of 2012, but it’s only just been given a release over here in the U.S., and a fairly paltry one at that. At least the wait was worth it. Toby Jones plays Gilderoy, a mild-mannered sound technician who finds himself working in an Italian studio on a Giallo horror film. Accustomed to more innocuous fare, Gilderoy doesn’t approve of the new material he is working on, resulting in some clashes of attitudes between himself and other members of the production crew (including the pretentious director who keeps insisting his work is art, in an attempt to excuse his own misogyny). As the post-production takes longer and longer to complete, and Gilderoy spends more and more time with the material, his psyche starts to fracture. The film is in part about the sense of personal worth someone can feel when involved with a project of questionable purpose. It’s also about the potential damaging effects of spending prolonged time with dark material; it isn’t much of a surprise when Gilderoy eventually starts having trouble distinguishing reality from fantasy, to the point where it appears his consciousness has somehow melded together with the film.

None of this material would be particularly memorable if Berberian Sound Studio was content to just ape past influences, generating meaning only through its associations with other works. What elevates the film above simple homage is director Peter Strickland’s unwillingness to fall back on the more predictable tropes of the films he references. He never shows onscreen any images from the incomplete Giallo film, instead placing all the emphasis on the sound design (one of the real pleasures of the film is watching the operations of the studio, and how non-violent objects are manipulated to create sounds of horrible violence). Unlike so many Giallo films, there is no overt violence, making it’s consistently-unsettling atmosphere all the more impressive. The soundtrack, from British experimental pop band Broadcast, is a key contributor as well, recreating many of the sounds from influential Giallo films while also working well as its own standalone piece. Overall, it’s an approach that bears more resemblance to the films of Polanski and Cronenberg than to Argento and Fulci and Bava, and it’s this approach that gives Berberian Sound Studio more staying power than what you’re likely to find in more commercial horror films. 9/10.


I've been wanting to check this out for quite some time--really glad to hear good things.

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Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:48 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The East (2013) 3/4

2011’s Sound of My Voice was arguably one of the year’s most interesting independent features. Sound of My Voice was made on a shoestring budget. It had no special effects, no A-List actors—but it did have a well-written, engaging story. Zal Batmanglij’s follow up, The East, still proves that the director has mass amounts of potential, signaling that he knows how to craft a pretty solid thriller while asking tough questions about the society that we live in. In many ways this film is a companion piece to the science fiction-cult drama Sound of My Voice, it follows a very similar path from a narrative standpoint and uses some of the same themes as its predecessor. The East starts out with an incredibly strong first half, but the second slowly starts to fizzle out from the ferocious strength of the first. With that said I can’t criticize this film too heavily (although there is an awful romantic subplot). There’s just something about Batmanglij’s films that draw me in and keep me glued to the screen, and for me that’s a great quality in itself.

Much Ado About Nothing (2013) 3/4

Joss Whedon has a knick for comedy, and how better to show it than through revitalizing a pretty stale Shakespeare classic. Much Ado isn’t a complete revision on the age-old play; instead the film sticks to its classical guns while interjecting great little spurts of humor that give the film a nice, memorable flare. This film consistently kept me grinning from ear to ear, and while it may not be as great as such modern day takes on Shakespeare such as Coriolanus, it still has a lot of heart and makes for completely enjoyable watch.

Before Midnight (2013) 3.5/4

No worries Reelviewers, I am not here to bash another Before film—quite the contrary actually. Before Midnight wooed me. Yes, it wooed me. I had my issues with Before Sunset, but such problems were not present here. Before Midnight perfectly shows the gradual decline of a relationship that was once nothing short of a fairy tale. At times I was completely taken aback by the films grim, coarse tone. The third act is where the film completely won me over. I’m not quite sure that I have ever seen such an accurate display of emotion on screen before. With that said the third act does seem a little long-winded at times and the note that the film ends on ultimately frustrated me a smidge. Regardless, Before Midnight is a truly beautiful film that captures the decay of love while weaving in strands of hope for a relationship that viewers are cheering for.

Monsters University (2013) 3/4

Finally, Pixar has dusted off its animated pants in order to give viewers a film that echoes the greatness of its Golden Age. Before I get into the good of Monsters University I have to say that I was sort of letdown by the implementation of formulaic character arcs in this film. Pixar is known for its originality, and with that viewers generally expect something that they haven’t seen before. Pixar doesn’t really deliver on this end. The plot is a little predictable, and the villain of the film comes across as utterly cliché. Yet as far as prequels go, Monsters University is a solid success. I have to say that I really liked this film. Yes parts are predictable, and the film spends quite a bit of time trotting along a very comfortable path, yet it also completely took me by surprise. The third act of this film (damn I keep harping on third acts—whatever) goes to places that no Pixar film has gone before. I don’t want to spoil anything for those of you who have not seen the film, but the duration of the third act has reinvigorated my hope for the animation studio. It’s just that good. I was caught between the 3-3.5 star range, but I had to hold back the Pixar fan boy inside.

Also, a shout out to the short film The Blue Umbrella. I’ve been hearing a lot of lukewarm comments concerning this short, but don’t listen to them! This is one of the best-animated shorts that I’ve seen in quite sometime.

This Is The End (2013) 2.5/4

Plenty of laughs and plenty of stupidity. This Is The End doesn’t suffer from a lack of bathroom humor or weed jokes—it just suffers from pure mediocrity. I can’t say that I didn’t enjoy this film to an extent; I just didn’t find it great or even good for that matter. I’m not quite sure what the point of using the actor’s real names served; having character names wouldn’t have really made a whole lot of difference. So yes This Is The End is a fun film, it has funny moments, it also has its dry ones—it’s just that nothing elevated this film to a realm of goodness for me.

Sansho the Bailiff (1954) 4/4

Kenji Mizoguchi’s Sansho the Baliff is a stunning film that examines the human spirit along with the human condition. The notion of a film being before its time can be overused and regurgitated until it becomes empty with meaning, but this notion encapsulates the story at the center of Sansho the Baliff. This particular narrative is constructed on an arguably epic scale, as it watches the lives of two young siblings in a place that is stripped of morals and decency. At the center of this ragged society, there is a man who stands up for the humanity of the people, but his methods are spark of light in a sea of darkness. The man teaches his son the values and merits of equality, making him memorize a few sentences that will hopefully guide him over a lifetime. In many ways this is a story about a son trying to honor the memory of his father by setting a group of people free. However, our protagonist can clearly never be free. He is haunted by the years of his life that made him cold and heartless, and is shackled to the memories of loved ones that are lost. Perhaps the newly freed slaves carry many of the same weights. By the end of the film a small question seems to be lurking around the edges of the aspect ratio—can freedom really make one free? Overall, Sansho the Bailiff is a truly devastating film that is nothing short of a true masterpiece.

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Wed Jun 26, 2013 12:08 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
American Graffiti (1973)
The movie follows four teenage friends during a single night in 1962 in Modesto, California: Two of them are about to leave to go to college the next day, whereas one of them has trouble splitting up with his girlfriend and the other one tries to meet an elusive mysterious woman in white. The other two friends spend their time cruising in hotrods and trying to pick up girls.
The keyword in any review of ‘American Graffiti’ is “nostalgia” and any viewer’s level of appreciation will directly correlate to his or her general feeling of nostalgia for either early 1960ies Americana or for teenage life and teenage problems in general. Frankly, the typical problems of a teenager, which are adressed in this movie (Will I get the girl of my dreams? etc.), seem rather shallow and don’t hold very much interest for me. Concerning the impeccable period stylings (cars, rock’n roll, surf music and doo wop on Wolfman Jack’s radio show), that’s all good and well, but the way in which it is presented and the choice of 1962 as the setting for this movie are strangely conservative, which I don’t mean in a political way, but more in a cultural one. Allow me to explain (and digress): In a recent TV documentary on the birth of rock music, it was convincingly argued that Rock’n Roll had lost its sense of rebellion and danger by the early 1960ies, after some key players had disappeared from the scene due to scandal (Jerry Lee Lewis marrying his 13 year old cousin), career choices (Elvis making movies after his military service) or death (Buddy Holly’s plane crash). From 1960 onwards, Rock ‘n Roll had become safe and respectable and the industry had discovered teenagers as consumers of records, clothes etc. Consequently, youth culture had become stale until the Beatles and other British bands shook it up again. ‘American Graffiti’ celebrates this exact moment in time, when youth culture was safe and mainstream and before the protests against the Vietnam War charged up the youth counterculture politically. In other words, this movie avoids controversy like the plague, which helps to make it more nostalgic for a wide audience but also makes it less interesting for me.
That being said, the movie is actually very well made on a technical level and concerning the script and acting. Its episodic nature means that some parts of it work better than others I didn’t much like the comedic bits featuring a nerd-ish character called “Toad” but it is very watchable overall. In my opinion, ‘American Graffiti’ isn’t quite the great movie it is sometimes made out to be, but it is still a good film. 7/10

Gangster Squad (2013)
It’s the 1940ies and L.A. underworld boss Mickey Cohen (Sean Penn) is about to control the whole city. Only a handpicked bunch of incorruptable renegade cops led by John O’Mara (Josh Brolin) stand in his way.
Every review of ‘Gangster Squad’ draws comparisons to Brian DePalma’s ‘The Untouchables’ and finds ‘Gangster Squad’ lacking a lot. There’s no reason to be original here: This comparison is absolutely fair and correct. However, most reviews fail to mention the utter stupidity and carelessness of the plot and the script in general. For example, O’Mara and his second in command Jerry Wooters (Ryan Gosling, who doesn’t have the heft for this type of role) argue about a caper, which nearly went wrong. Wooters demands better planning, stating that it’s sheer luck that they survived a game of hot potatoes with hand grenades. O’Mara, the supposed expert in guerilla wafare and tactics, answers “But it worked.” Hell, I can give better tactical advice than that after having read Sun Tsu’s 2,500 years-old “The Art of War” once a few years ago. Then there are two inane montage sequences which are close to self-parody. The dialogue is laughable at times, consisting mostly of really lame one-liners, which is still better than the cringeworthy voiceover at the beginning and at the end. As for the positives - or rather: the positive - the movie looks very glossy in the maner of a shiny new car. Finally, the movie is distinguished by extreme and graphic violence (for this type of genre), which was unnecessary and off-putting for me. I had the impression that the violence served as a means to hold up interest, where the plot and action failed. That’s not a good thing and cannot be excused by the pulpy natuire of the film. It is a bad movie. 3/10


Wed Jun 26, 2013 5:49 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
A few people mentioned these already, but in between the NBA and NHL Finals action, I caught up on two movies.

Despicable Me-- ***

This was so much fun. Better than a good chunk of Pixar's movies, although not their best. Yeah, it's ridiculous even for a cartoon to have these "supervillains" running around and no authorities to deal with them, but that's a minor quibble. I got a lot of laughs out of the minions (their garbled rendition of "Copacabana" had me dying), and the relationship between Gru and the girls is quite touching. I'll definitely see the second one.

Cloud Atlas-- ***

The very definition of an ambitious movie. I admired what the filmmakers were trying to do with these six stories, even though it didn't always work. Some of them are fitfully entertaining while others (the two futuristic tales) are spectacularly so. And while this is a long movie at about 2:45 sans credits, it never lost my attention. Interweaving the stories is the right call to maximize the film's pacing.

But having said that, I'm not entirely comfortable with various actors crossing racial lines in this movie. It's not just some of the godawful makeup jobs, but the fact that they couldn't just get actors of the proper race to play each role. I know, it's supposed to highlight how everything is connected, but it didn't work for me.

I still like this movie overall, but not without a few reservations.

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Wed Jun 26, 2013 8:49 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JackBurns wrote:
Sansho the Bailiff (1954) 4/4

Kenji Mizoguchi’s Sansho the Baliff is a stunning film that examines the human spirit along with the human condition. The notion of a film being before its time can be overused and regurgitated until it becomes empty with meaning, but this notion encapsulates the story at the center of Sansho the Baliff. This particular narrative is constructed on an arguably epic scale, as it watches the lives of two young siblings in a place that is stripped of morals and decency. At the center of this ragged society, there is a man who stands up for the humanity of the people, but his methods are spark of light in a sea of darkness. The man teaches his son the values and merits of equality, making him memorize a few sentences that will hopefully guide him over a lifetime. In many ways this is a story about a son trying to honor the memory of his father by setting a group of people free. However, our protagonist can clearly never be free. He is haunted by the years of his life that made him cold and heartless, and is shackled to the memories of loved ones that are lost. Perhaps the newly freed slaves carry many of the same weights. By the end of the film a small question seems to be lurking around the edges of the aspect ratio—can freedom really make one free? Overall, Sansho the Bailiff is a truly devastating film that is nothing short of a true masterpiece.


My number 1 movie of last year. Terrific film. Now go see Ugetsu.

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Wed Jun 26, 2013 8:49 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
JackBurns wrote:
Sansho the Bailiff (1954) 4/4

Kenji Mizoguchi’s Sansho the Baliff is a stunning film that examines the human spirit along with the human condition. The notion of a film being before its time can be overused and regurgitated until it becomes empty with meaning, but this notion encapsulates the story at the center of Sansho the Baliff. This particular narrative is constructed on an arguably epic scale, as it watches the lives of two young siblings in a place that is stripped of morals and decency. At the center of this ragged society, there is a man who stands up for the humanity of the people, but his methods are spark of light in a sea of darkness. The man teaches his son the values and merits of equality, making him memorize a few sentences that will hopefully guide him over a lifetime. In many ways this is a story about a son trying to honor the memory of his father by setting a group of people free. However, our protagonist can clearly never be free. He is haunted by the years of his life that made him cold and heartless, and is shackled to the memories of loved ones that are lost. Perhaps the newly freed slaves carry many of the same weights. By the end of the film a small question seems to be lurking around the edges of the aspect ratio—can freedom really make one free? Overall, Sansho the Bailiff is a truly devastating film that is nothing short of a true masterpiece.


My number 1 movie of last year. Terrific film. Now go see Ugetsu.


Very nice write-up. This was maybe the most no-brainer pickup for me ever when it was released on Bluray earlier this year. Ugetsu is damn good too.

Anyone else seen any other Mizoguchi films besides those two? I've been meaning to check out more of his work. Right now I've got a hold placed on The Life Of Oharu at my local library, and I've been eyeing that Criterion Eclipse collection Kenji Mizoguchi's Fallen Women whenever the next B&N sale rolls along.

JackBurns wrote:
Also, a shout out to the short film The Blue Umbrella. I’ve been hearing a lot of lukewarm comments concerning this short, but don’t listen to them! This is one of the best-animated shorts that I’ve seen in quite sometime.


I really liked this too. Maybe it's the similarities to last year's Paperman that have led to the more mixed reactions, but I thought it was lovely. The animation by itself was pretty stunning.

Agreed on Monsters University too, especially your thoughts on the third act. I'll have something more detailed written down on it in the next few days.

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Wed Jun 26, 2013 12:57 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Quote:
Anyone else seen any other Mizoguchi films besides those two?


saw Sisters of the Gion and Street of Shame. Both about geishas, both bummers(shocker)
Street of Shame is better(his final film)
Both are worth seeing.


Wed Jun 26, 2013 2:34 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
My number 1 movie of last year. Terrific film. Now go see Ugetsu.


Adding it to the queue!

Blonde Almond wrote:
Very nice write-up. This was maybe the most no-brainer pickup for me ever when it was released on Bluray earlier this year. Ugetsu is damn good too.


I will definitely be picking up Sansho on Bluray as well. I've heard the video quality is amazing.

Blonde Almond wrote:
I really liked this too. Maybe it's the similarities to last year's Paperman that have led to the more mixed reactions, but I thought it was lovely. The animation by itself was pretty stunning.

Agreed on Monsters University too, especially your thoughts on the third act. I'll have something more detailed written down on it in the next few days.


It seems that the majority of the complaints are rooted in its similarity to Paperman. I haven't gotten around to seeing it so I can't really comment. Regardless, the animation in The Blue Umbrella is breathtaking. I was literally questioning whether or not it was animation at times. Being able to create such realism is astounding, and I think its safe to say that its the best animation I've seen thus far from Pixar.

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Wed Jun 26, 2013 3:50 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
calvero wrote:
Quote:
Anyone else seen any other Mizoguchi films besides those two?


saw Sisters of the Gion and Street of Shame. Both about geishas, both bummers(shocker)
Street of Shame is better(his final film)
Both are worth seeing.


The Life of Ohara's good, if a bit repetitive. Women of the Night is sort of formulaic Mizoguchi until the last scenes which pack a real punch. I like Sisters of the Gion and Street of Shame. I really dislike Osaka Elegy (a switchboard operator becomes her boss's mistress in order to get him to pay off her father's debts, then gets another man to give her money for her brother's tuition, then, after getting herself and would-be fiance arrested, wonders why he and her family rejects her).

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Thu Jun 27, 2013 1:27 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Chaplin is a reasonably good movie with serious flaws. There are excellent performances, particularly by Robert Downey, Jr. as Chaplin himself, Diane Lane as Paulette Goddard, and to an extent Geraldine Chaplin as Hannah Chaplin (her own grandmother) and Dan Ackroyd as Mack Sennett. It generally looks great. There is one scene showing the first appearance of the Tramp, in a Mabel Normand short, which is not only great but considerably better than the original short.

But we see very little of Chaplin actually making films, with the exception of him putting Edna Purviance through 30 takes for one short, and composing and editing Modern Times. You get a much better idea how Mack Sennett made films, which is interesting but not exactly what you come to see. The big fault here is that Richard Attenborough used Chaplin's Autobiography as a source, and Chaplin didn't like to tell people how he made films. He thought it was like a magician revealing his tricks. So we get a film that mostly about other aspects of his life, and, since he lived more than 80 years, there's a lot of life to go through, much of it superficially.

However that brings up other problems in that the film tries to find explanations for aspects of his life by using pat formulas. Why did Chaplin like young girls? The film explains they all reminded him of his long-list first love, Hetty Kelly, to the point that Hetty and his fourth wife, Oona O'Neill Chaplin, are played by the same actress. (As near as I can tell, it's not mentioned that Oona was the daughter of Eugene O'Neill, which you'd think would get mentioned since O'Neill was outraged and cut his daughter off.) Why did Hoover pursue Chaplin? It comes down to a fictional dinner party where they argued.

I think Attenborough would have better off concentrating on one phase of Chaplin's life that trying to cover fifty years of it. And the framing device, where an editor is discussing what Chaplin left out of his autobiography, is awkward. So I can only give the film a 6, or at most a 6.5, out of 10.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Rolling Thunder (1977)
After years as a prisoner of war, traumatised Vietnam War veteran Rane (William Devane) returns home only to find himself alienated from his family and the small town community. When he is given a case of silver dollars - one for each day of his captivity - a gang attacks him in his house, maims his hand in a waste disposal unit and then shoots him and his family. Rane survives, but loses his hand, which is substituted by a prosthetic hook. Rane duly sharpens the hook, saws off a shotgun and goes to exact bloody revenge.
I stumbled across this 70ies exploitation film when I read that it was one of Quentin Tarantino's favourite movies. It is indeed exceptional for an exploitation flick because it features well-acted (Devane is an underrated actor anyway and the movie also features an incredibly young Tommy Lee Jones), realistic and three dimensional characters and, for half of its running time, is more concerned with the protagonist's problems in readjusting to a civilian life. Once the revenge plot kicks in, though, the movie becomes lacklustre and uninteresting. The movie was considered as extremely violent at the time of its release, but that in itself isn't enough to make it exciting and the action isn't much crop either. Overall, a mediocre movie. 5/10


Fri Jun 28, 2013 5:42 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Kill!

Two drifting swordsmen wander into a dusty town and end up getting themselves caught in the middle of a clan dispute. That's the plot, but for the simple description it's actually kind of muddy; many of the characters and subplots aren't fleshed out enough, making the story harder to follow than it needs to be. However, this is interesting to watch if you want to see just how much the western had influenced Japanese filmmaking. Kill! is practically a spaghetti western set in Japan, with its intense closeups and stirring music. The plot, though, was better executed in Yojimbo.

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Sat Jun 29, 2013 8:59 am
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On the flight from Paris to Mauritius (which is a cool thing to write, I must admit) I was largely charmed by Wreck-It Ralph, which I missed in theaters last year. I liked the energy and the score, the animation and the in-jokes, and I'm currently torn between *** and ***.5

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Sat Jun 29, 2013 11:17 am
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You're such a hipster, James ;)

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Sat Jun 29, 2013 1:40 pm
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One of my giddiest theater experiences. I felt geeked out every time those apartment people move in their 8-bit ways, especially when they go up stairs; I can't stop myself from grinning a long time at that.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
King of Beggars stars Stephen Chow as 19th Century Chinese aristocrat So Chan who, to win the hand of his true love, has to win a contest for Martial Arts Champion (a combination warrior and scholar). When it is discovered he had illicit help from his father, the General of Canton, So Chan and his father are stripped of their wealth though the mechanizations of an evil courtier, and sentenced to be beggars for the rest of their life. As it happens, the woman he loves is the daughter of the last King of Beggars, and he happened to be killed by the same evil courtier.

It has all the humor and style you expect from Chow, although it gets more serious toward the end. He didn't direct or write it, but it looks to me like he had a lot of input. Oh, and it's based on a historical character. But then, so is The Legend of Drunken Master. (7 of 10)

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Chinatown

[insert my standard I just don't get film noir monologue here]

Anyways, I didn't think this was too bad. Some nice acting on the part of Faye Dunway and Jack Nickleson. A few nice plot twists and turns. Some well done cinematography. But at the end of the day my overall feeling was "meh". This is basically a film about a consiracy involving water rights and real estate deals, with some tawdry incest thrown in at the end. In fact that's my biggest issue with this film, we spend so much time focused on the investigation into the water issue, that the incest material feels tacked on.

Which is a shame, as there was so much material here that would have been worth exploring. No, it didn't need to be shown, but what were the psychological effects on Evelyn? How does she deal with it in her everyday life? What exactly is the relationship (or rather how does it play out) between her and her sister/daughter? So many questions left unanswered while the film spends time focused on real estate deals.

Edit: There's also a glaring plot hole in that the attempt to discredit Ellis was destined to backfire and generally an obvious waste of effort from the outset. The more effective, "just kill him and dump in the river" method worked out much better, but by that time the baddies thought of it, they'd already dragged Gittes onto the case. Whoops.
-Jeremy

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Sun Jun 30, 2013 11:39 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Really off-topic, but I’ve been reading up old posts, and just realized: Has anyone known where Mark III has gone? For a period of time, he’s one of the more passionate and insightful film watchers on the site, and I enjoy reading him very much. I’ve never noticed he stopped posting until I stumbled on his avatar in an older post.


Mon Jul 01, 2013 6:24 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
peng wrote:
Really off-topic, but I’ve been reading up old posts, and just realized: Has anyone known where Mark III has gone? For a period of time, he’s one of the more passionate and insightful film watchers on the site, and I enjoy reading him very much. I’ve never noticed he stopped posting until I stumbled on his avatar in an older post.


Probably being the family man again.


Mon Jul 01, 2013 6:29 am
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