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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
MunichMan wrote:
KWRoss wrote:
The Help-- ***1/2
Yeah, I know a certain someone on this board is going to give me a lot of shit for this one. So come at me, bro.


And exactly how will that shit be delivered? ;)


Behind a spoiler tag and/or inside a pie.

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Sun Jun 09, 2013 8:29 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:

Ross! Hey...how's it going? Glad to see you're watching some movies and...oh...you just gave The Help 3.5 stars. Well that's a horse of a different color isn't it? I'm going to put my rant behind a spoiler tag so you can just ignore it if you want, k?

In any case...

[Reveal] Spoiler:
WHAT THE EVERLOVING SHIT, MAN? This is a movie about race relations in the 1960s that
A. Focuses on the true drama of the story...whether an "unattractive" girl played by Emma Stone can get a book deal
B. Is so poorly constructed that it wants us to feel sorry for a person who steals from her employer and gets in trouble for it
C. FEATURES BLACK PEOPLE SHITTING IN WHITE PEOPLE'S PIES FOR HUMOR'S SAKE. This was the 1960s, the last decade in which blacks had to suffer through legalized, codified racism and discrimination, and (most importantly) violence. This was not a time when black people, again, shat in white people's pies and giggled about it or (maybe) at worst lost their jobs. Look at Emmett Till. Look at EMMETT MOTHERFUCKING TILL. Now I'm not saying the 1960s was anywhere close to this bad, but imagine a Holocaust movie where the zany concentration camp inmates took dumps in the Commandant's pies so the audience could laugh when he took a bite.


Alrighty then, let's dance.

Point A: I personally found Emma Stone more attractive than most of the women in this movie, with the possible exception of Jessica Chastain.... giggity. But anyway, her dating life was a subplot, not the main focus. And I ultimately appreciate how the movie decides she doesn't need a man to complete her.

Point B: That ring was lost behind the couch, so the maid happens to stumble upon it and think she can pawn it for the money to send her sons to college. I get your point, but it's a little different than if she had actually stolen the ring from it's proper place, like a dresser or nightstand.

Point C: Hilly was a real bitch, but she was so embarrassed about the situation (and who wouldn't be? you just ate a pie with shit in it without knowing it until being told?) that she didn't want word getting out. Having Minny killed would've opened up a huge controversy and murder trial that would've interfered with her political efforts. And no, the 1960s wasn't anywhere near as bad as a concentration camp, where not even "equality under the law" comes into play, so I can't imagine this scene being used in a movie like that. A zany inmate would be shot on sight for this.

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Sun Jun 09, 2013 8:32 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Monty Python's The Meaning of Life

The Pythons take on birth, death, middle age and everything else in their usual goofy, irreverent style. Not as good as Holy Grail or Life of Brian, but it has its funny moments.

Back to School

Rodney Dangerfield is a funny guy, but this film hasn't aged very well, and it's an absolute drag whenever Dangerfield isn't on screen. I suppose it's alright as a lazy time passer, but there's better comedies from the 80s.

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Sun Jun 09, 2013 8:04 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
KWRoss wrote:
Point B: That ring was lost behind the couch, so the maid happens to stumble upon it and think she can pawn it for the money to send her sons to college. I get your point, but it's a little different than if she had actually stolen the ring from it's proper place, like a dresser or nightstand.


Regardless, the movie is set up so that Hilly is evil for getting her arrested. I'm about as liberal as they come, and I was going "Pffffft: you do the crime, you consent to the time"

KWRoss wrote:
Point C: Hilly was a real bitch, but she was so embarrassed about the situation (and who wouldn't be? you just ate a pie with shit in it without knowing it until being told?) that she didn't want word getting out. Having Minny killed would've opened up a huge controversy and murder trial that would've interfered with her political efforts. And no, the 1960s wasn't anywhere near as bad as a concentration camp, where not even "equality under the law" comes into play, so I can't imagine this scene being used in a movie like that. A zany inmate would be shot on sight for this.


I don't think you get my point. The movie, and the pie scene, takes a terrible, dark time fraught with danger and trivializes it. This was a time in which black people were killed for such things, and in the movie it's high comedy. This diminishes how bad things really were in the South in a really pernicious way.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:

KWRoss wrote:
Point C: Hilly was a real bitch, but she was so embarrassed about the situation (and who wouldn't be? you just ate a pie with shit in it without knowing it until being told?) that she didn't want word getting out. Having Minny killed would've opened up a huge controversy and murder trial that would've interfered with her political efforts. And no, the 1960s wasn't anywhere near as bad as a concentration camp, where not even "equality under the law" comes into play, so I can't imagine this scene being used in a movie like that. A zany inmate would be shot on sight for this.


I don't think you get my point. The movie, and the pie scene, takes a terrible, dark time fraught with danger and trivializes it. This was a time in which black people were killed for such things, and in the movie it's high comedy. This diminishes how bad things really were in the South in a really pernicious way.


My point is that while yes, blacks were killed for things like this, I looked at this as a specific instance involving specific characters. Hilly would be the laughingstock of the town if word got out that she ate feces and didn't realize it. That's why she wanted to keep a low profile about it. At least that's how I perceived it.

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Sun Jun 09, 2013 10:17 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Days Of Being Wild - Kar Wai Wong's second feature film is really the first glimpse at what would become something of a trademark style. The film is the director's first collaboration with cinematographer Christopher Doyle, it features a cast of some of the biggest stars in Chinese cinema, it deals with themes of romantic longing and unrequited love, and it's all supported by a brilliant and eclectic music selection. It's a mix that would work brilliantly in films like Chungking Express and In The Mood For Love, but here you get the sense that, apart from his inspired use of Brazilian guitar duo Los Indios Tabajaras, Kai hasn't quite figured out how to employ everything to the best effect. Leslie Cheung plays Yuddy, an aimless playboy who halfheartedly seduces two women, played by Maggie Cheung and Carina Lau, before carelessly tossing them away in favor of new conquests. For reasons that are never quite made clear, the two women are devastated by his dismissals, so much so that they ignore the clear affections of others that come into their lives. Yuddy's careless attitude towards relationships is revealed to be a byproduct of a dysfunctional relationship with his adoptive mother, but even with this excuse it's tough to really sympathize with his character. Not that being sympathetic is absolutely necessary, but Yuddy also isn't very interesting, which creates a disconnect that isn't present in Kar's more successful films.

The film was originally meant to have multiple parts, but due to the low returns on its initial release, the opportunity to continue forward with a direct sequel never materialized. You can still see evidence of Kar's original intentions, particularly in the final scene, which features a brief appearance by Tony Leung, who had not appeared previously but would have been the main subject of the next film. Nowadays, the film is considered the first in a loosely-defined trilogy, along with In The Mood For Love and 2046, although the connections between the three films aren't overtly apparent beyond thematic similarities and the recurring appearances of a few characters (I can see 2046 looking different on another viewing; In The Mood For Love has a more self-contained narrative). Days Of Being Wild is for me the least compelling of the three films, serving more as an interesting but uneven introduction to the kind of material that Kar Wai Wong would essentially master in his later work. 5/10.

The Friends Of Eddie Coyle - My viewing of this film has been a long time coming. I bought it as part of a frenzied shopping spree during one of the semiannual Criterion sales at Barnes & Noble a couple years ago, back when I wasn't worrying too much about how many titles I snatched up at once. But then it sat on my shelf for awhile, for no other reason than I kept forgetting that it was there, my attention preoccupied with other films. Well, after a little less than two years since picking it up, I finally sat down to watch it. And I wish I had watched it sooner, because it's a damn good film, although admittedly a little different than what I was expecting. What I thought was going to be an action-packed crime film turned out to be more of a character drama than anything else, with a brilliant performance from Robert Mitchum standing front and center. He has a early monologue where he talks about why he has extra knuckles on his hands, and you're can't help but be reminded of a similar hand-related speech, the famous tale of Right Hand Left Hand in The Night Of The Hunter. He's playing a different character here though, not a psychopath but a surprisingly-sympathetic criminal, a working-class family man who relies on his associations with the criminal underworld to generate income, who finds himself in a bind from which he may have no real way out.

The director is Peter Yates, probably best known for Bullitt and its incredible car chase centerpiece. The Friends Of Eddie Coyle doesn't have any one sequence that replicates the high energy of that famous sequence; the film operates on a lower key, and apart from the staging of two lengthy bank robberies, one successful and one unsuccessful, it relies more on character interactions. Not often would I say that a film needed less action, but interestingly enough that's the case here. The two bank robberies, while tense and spare and effective, take up a good part of the running length, time that I wouldn't have minded spending in Mitchum's company, that's how good he is. His last-ditch efforts to save himself are heartbreaking, and Mitchum is perfect at conveying a man who knows the end is approaching and who quietly resigns to whatever fate might befall him. When the sudden and bleakly appropriate conclusion comes rolling along, you realize that in the criminal world, the idea of friendship really doesn't mean all that much, not in a world where everyone is looking out for themselves above anything else. It's the focus on that quiet recognition that elevates The Friends Of Eddie Coyle above the more typical films of its kind. 9/10.

Conversations With Other Women - At a wedding reception, a man and a woman trade glimpses with each other from across the room. He's played by Aaron Eckhart, he's there to witness his sister's marriage, and he recognizes someone across the room who he hasn't seen for a long time. She's played by Helena Bonham Carter, and she's a bridesmaid who took a flight from England to America, with the secret hope to run into him again, even if it's just for one night. The film will spend the rest of its time watching the two reconnect with each other, as they try to gleam hints of each other's lives and if there might still be something there between them. It might be too easy of a comparison to make, but director Hans Canosa's work here is reminiscent of Richard Linklater's Before films (especially the most recent entry Before Midnight), with their almost-exclusive emphasis on the melancholic/romantic conversations and chemistry between two lovers. But where Before Midnight took the stance that, even after many passing years and changing situations and obligations, people are at heart still the same people as they once were, Conversations With Other Women argues a person many years down the road will not be the same person as in the present time (this theme is hinted at in the title of the film; there is only one central woman, but she's not the same woman as she was many years before).

I probably shouldn't have made the comparison to the Before films; it's not really fair to Conversations With Other Women, which has plenty of merits that are distinctly its own, particularly in its unconventional storytelling approach. The entire film is told in split-screen, even though the action is exclusively conversation. Sometimes the two sides will show the same conversation from different angles, with the two characters occasionally occupying the same space but more often than not separated from each other by the break in the middle. Other times the action on one side will cut away, to show either the memories of the characters or an alternate version of a character's dialogue. At first, I was worried that this technique would end up distracting from the film's content, but you get used to it quickly and it ends up serving as a nice complement to the points the film is trying to get across. The two characters may be close together, but there is a disconnect between their memories of each other and the people they are now. Handled the wrong way, this stylistic device could have sunk the whole thing, but it comes together quite beautifully. I'm not sure how I managed to overlook this film before, but it deserves to be given a chance. 8/10.

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Sun Jun 09, 2013 10:40 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
KWRoss wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:

KWRoss wrote:
Point C: Hilly was a real bitch, but she was so embarrassed about the situation (and who wouldn't be? you just ate a pie with shit in it without knowing it until being told?) that she didn't want word getting out. Having Minny killed would've opened up a huge controversy and murder trial that would've interfered with her political efforts. And no, the 1960s wasn't anywhere near as bad as a concentration camp, where not even "equality under the law" comes into play, so I can't imagine this scene being used in a movie like that. A zany inmate would be shot on sight for this.


I don't think you get my point. The movie, and the pie scene, takes a terrible, dark time fraught with danger and trivializes it. This was a time in which black people were killed for such things, and in the movie it's high comedy. This diminishes how bad things really were in the South in a really pernicious way.


My point is that while yes, blacks were killed for things like this, I looked at this as a specific instance involving specific characters. Hilly would be the laughingstock of the town if word got out that she ate feces and didn't realize it. That's why she wanted to keep a low profile about it. At least that's how I perceived it.


That may well be, but I could plausibly invent one concentration camp guard who just can't tell anyone about the fact that he just ate some inmate shit and it doesn't change the fact that my movie would be trivializing and glossing over peoples' suffering

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Sun Jun 09, 2013 10:45 pm
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Hamburger Hill

Finally I made it through that movie after catching bits and pieces of it on tv over the years.

I am not sure what to make of it. Still: the performances of Courtney B. Vance, Don Cheadle and Dylan McDermott alone make this movie worthwhile.

I know this movie is basically a "thank you, you are not forgotten" to the young soldiers who faught (and died) in battles under unbelievable circumstances. I don't feel I have the right to type even one more letter about the subject (I never faught in any war), I still feel something's off in this movie (besides the fact that it seems to have no dramatic arc and no story at all).

Even though this movie seems like being anti war, it isn't. It does take sides. The enemy needs to be killed off because they take cheap shots and they are on top of the hill.

The first movie to set things straight (that I have seen) was: "The Thin Red Line". Same situation: trying to take a hill is pure carnage and soldiers are getting desperate having to watch their war buddies die from heavy machinegun fire from the top and grenades being thrown down. But once the hill is taken, we see who the "enemy" really is: half starved kids. Not saying that this was the case in 'Nam, but "Hamburger Hill" still has a strong patriotic pro-war message resonating. Even if it's just a desperate: "Do it for me, take the damn hill!". Taking the hill means killing just the same kids who perhaps all just want to go home. One single scene hints at it: even the enemy soldiers carry photos of their beloved ones.

I am not a lame pacifist who doesn't know what the shit he is talking about. No way. I cannot express what
I feel for young boys fighting in ridiculous conditions. Even in WWI the trenches and general strategies were outdated. Much more so during the 'Nam war - which definitely was one hell of a bad call.

Not sure there is much of a movie in "Hamburger Hill", but watching the small dramatic moments being carried out by very talented actors is more than enough reason to watch the flick. Graphic violence/carnage is kept to a minimum, well below the level of, say, "Saving Private Ryan".

As a musician I couldn't help but notice the absence of a score with the exception of the beginning and some final battle scenes. Philip Glass, a composer of orchestral minimalism, definitely was a bad choice. He was a brilliant choice in "The Truman Show" though. But I digress....

Anyway: good performances in a movie made (most likely) for 'Nam vets only. Well, why not?


Last edited by Threeperf35 on Sun Jun 09, 2013 11:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Sun Jun 09, 2013 10:57 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Two movies today as I seek to prove to Reelviews (and the world at large) that my nuttage is nothing less than adequate.

The Color of Money (1986) **1/2

I'm one of the few people in the world who doesn't really like The Hustler much at all. I think that it has some good moments and a nice George C. Scott performance, but it features a fairly simple sports-movie-type storyline (Man loses big event in beginning due to character flaws. Man matures. Man wins event in the end) and it takes too damn long to get to a place where it was obviously going in the first place.

By contrast, The Color of Money went in different directions than I was expecting, particularly in its interesting second half. However, the first half is so achingly familiar that it was irritating to watch. Tom Cruise is a callow youth and behaves in such a manner over, and over, and over again. Newman is fine and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio is much better than she has been in anything else I've seen her in, but the first half is a slog. Once Forest Whitaker shows up the movie takes a turn for the better, but not quite enough to make me want to recommend it.

The Train (1964) ***

Based on the true story (though incredibly juiced up for Hollywood's sake) of the French Resistance's attempts to save their artwork from the Nazis as World War II marched to a conclusion, this is one of the last big World War II movies I hadn't seen. Directed by John Frankenheimer (who, incidentally, had a hell of a run in the mid-1960s), The Train doesn't have much depth but it has some incredible long takes, riveting effects sequences in which trains go smashing into each other with the sound of twisting metal, and a final piece of editing that achieves poignancy. Worth seeing.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
Two movies today as I seek to prove to Reelviews (and the world at large) that my nuttage is nothing less than adequate.


Sorry, I just HAD to comment on this. Gotta love that word: "nuttage" as in "performance level of testicles" which itself is a metaphor of course. Just beautiful! :lol: :lol: :lol:


Sun Jun 09, 2013 11:05 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
A Serious Man - 3.5 Stars

Another exceptional effort from Ethan and Joel Coen, who go in a much different direction than they had for most of their work in the first decade of the millenium. It's a step below their top tier, but only because I didn't really like the first scene. It fits thematically but kinda drags. Everything else is spectacular, thought-provoking stuff. The decision to eschew name actors was a great one, because you don't have to worry about the actor getting in the way of the character. It doesn't always work, but when you're as adept at directing actors as the Coens are, it's a great choice. The only cast members I recognized were Richard Kind and Adam Arkin, but that's from their TV roles; they're not big film actors by any means. It seems like the biblical story of Job is mentioned in every review of this film, for good reason, but I appreciated mostly its major difference from Job: there's no cause identified at any point. In Job, God afflicts (or allows Satan to afflict) the title character with every misfortune imaginable because of a bet with Satan. Here whether God exists at all (and if he does, if he's testing the title character) is very much a key question.

The acting is all-around excellent, with special praise for Michael Stuhlbarg's Larry, who is relatable and enigmatic, often at the same time; Fred Melamed, whose Sy is oily, smarmy, and charming; Ari Hoptman, whose turn as the tenure committee member is absolutely delightful; and the aforementioned Kind and Arkin, who try to help Larry with his predicament. This is such a well-crafted motion picture, and it asks some intriguing questions, even for those who don't normally concern themselves with spiritual matters.


Mon Jun 10, 2013 5:48 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Beowulf - 3 Stars

Robert Zemeckis does a solid job adapting the widely-regarded first work of English literature, with much of the success going to the screenplay adapted by Neil Gaiman and Roger Avary. Yes, they take liberties with the classical source material, but the film references how oral tradition distorts the truth, so for me that's acceptable. It's a visually stunning movie, particularly in the final battle with the dragon, which really pushes the envelope for action sequences. The decision to make this an all-CGI mocap animation film was an interesting choice; on the one hand it allows the characters to age without costly makeup (and old-age makeup is notoriously difficult to pull off convincingly) and it also allows for much more rampant nudity than you'd see in a typical live-action film. One problem is the uncanny valley though. The acting suffers for it, so that there isn't a truly memorable performance, though Anthony Hopkins' dignified touch is much appreciated, as is Brendan Gleeson's. The women in particular look unconvincing for some odd reason, though the pale, waxy appearance of Angelina Jolie's skin and her otherworldly eyes may have been an artistic decision. I don't mind the look of the characters as much as some people do (I know people who say it freaks them out to such a degree that they can't even watch such films) but it's not advanced enough yet to the point where it doesn't look like a video game. Curiously enough, there were a few moments during which I thought I was watching a video game: the horses for whatever reason aren't realistic enough so they feel like an excerpt from a Zelda game, when Beowulf runs toward the bridge in the dragon battle I couldn't help thinking of God of War (Alan Silvestri's score is rather similar on the surface to that of God of War too), and some of the dialogue sequences (including the character's movements) reminded me of the Uncharted series. Now this isn't necessarily a bad thing, but watching this film on Netflix on my PS3 was a rather meta experience, to say the least.


Mon Jun 10, 2013 5:49 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
A Separation-- ****

I'm so glad I finally "nutted up" and decided to watch this one. I had it on the back burner for so long because the subject matter felt so dry to me in spite of the critical raves and Oscar it received. I'll be careful not to make that mistake again. This is the best foreign movie I've seen since City of God. It delivers so many multi-dimensional characters and keeps us guessing as to what actually happened to the housekeeper. This movie is so many things all in two hours; a courtroom thriller, a commentary on religious influence in Iran's government, a multi-layered family drama, and a tale of lies and mis-communication. It's one I'd happily watch again just to pick up on details I missed. And unlike a lot of acclaimed foreign films, which Hollywood is all-too-eager to remake into English, there's no way they could do it here. It's a distinctly Iranian story; take away the strictness of divorce law and the importance of swearing on the Quran, and there is no movie.

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Mon Jun 10, 2013 10:17 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Gwaihir wrote:
A Serious Man - 3.5 Stars

The Coens are so maddening, first and foremost because trying to pick favorites from their catalog is an exercise in frustration.

I'm fairly certain that Barton Fink is their greatest effort... but the second place position is such a damn contest. A Serious Man is definitely a contender.

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Mon Jun 10, 2013 11:41 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The People vs. George Lucas (2010) 2/4

We all know that people have strong feelings when it comes to George Lucas. Diehard fans of Star Wars hate his nonstop tinkering, and many fanboys claim that it has destroyed the very fabric of their childhoods. On the flip side, other people revere Lucas as genius--A man who inspired a generation in terms of imagination and originality. The main issue with The People vs. George Lucas is that it gives viewers old information through a pretty lukewarm lense. This doc is broken up into segments, some of which seem pretty repetitive. The viewer is given a brief history of Lucas where he is praised, and then the film cuts to a segment where fans and haters bash Lucas for a good amount of time. This system continues for the duration of the film. After about the first 25 minutes, viewers get the idea—we know people love and also hate Lucas. In this sense the documentary never brings anything new to light per se, and it ultimately may leave viewers with a bland taste in their mouths.

If a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front (2010) 3/4

I didn’t know anything about this documentary’s main topic. While I went in blind, by the end of the film I had learned quite a bit. Not only is this a solid piece on the influences of the “eco-terror movement,” but it’s also a great examination on political protests as a whole.

Stories We Tell (2012) 3.5/4

This is by far one of the best films I’ve seen all year. Director Sarah Polley crafts a stunning documentary that looks at the vey essence of memories, while embracing the contradictions that come with the act of remembering. Without trying to come across a hokey, I have to say, this is story telling at its finest. The structure of this film is nothing short of brilliant. Stories We Tell weaves a narrative out of the perspectives of multiple people. Everyone’s story is different to a degree, yet even as the central story is told from different viewpoints it all flows together perfectly. All of the elements in this film fit together to make a truly unique experience—from the super eight family videos that serve as “reenactments” to the superb editing—this is a film that will hook you from start to finish.

Frances Ha (2012) 3.5/4

I never got or reciprocated the love for Lena Dunham’s Tiny Furniture. The humor never worked for me, and it ultimately felt like an empty, failed attempt at creating a homage to Woody Allen. Frances Ha is different. This film captures the insecure mindset and outlook of the average college graduate in a light, moving way. It’s easy to sympathize with our protagonist. Many of us have felt the same emotions conveyed in this film. The twenty-something life crisis is real, and Frances Ha conveys it in a beautiful way. While the end of the third act rushes the narrative along a bit too quickly, this film is a pure joy to watch.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
It (1927) Clara Bow plays Pennywise, an evil clown who disguises himself as a spunky shopgirl so he/she can lure millionaires to his/her lair where they are seduced and devoured. Bow is very convincing despite having eight sexy legs and five expressive eyes. The screams continued in "It Happened One Night, "It Conquered the World" and "Whip It."

Tired of playing the same roles, Bow retired to a ranch in Montana to consume her victims at leisure. Her fame remains strong among those for whom the phrase "It Girl" has a dark and sinister meaning. (6.5 of 10)

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
As far as the real movie it, it has problems, although there is a lot to like about it. I usually like Clara Bow, but her character her alternates between being heroic, being spunky, and being dishonest, and the object of her manipulations strikes me as being unworthy of them. The comic relief, Monty Montgomery, is treated pretty badly, and is silly but actually would probably be a more decent husband. It's implied at the end that Monty and the rejected almost fiancee might wind up together, which is a better pairing than the two leads.

And, no, Monty is not gay. It's obvious that he's interested in the opposite sex (after all, he's the one who realized the only salesgirl who has "it" is the one who's played by Clara Bow, and promptly did his best to pick her up), but not that good at landing a girlfriend, because he's singularly lacking in "it."

It's odd that a film as popular and influential as it was actually lost for decades. You'd expect it of less important films, but not of a film that spawned a famous description like the 'It Girl.'

There's a frankly embarrassing cameo appearance by Elinor Glyn explaining what "it" is, which we've already had several explanations of. She was an adept and banal self-promoter who expressed a pretty obvious idea that Rudyard Kipling (of all people) had espressed decades before.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Ken wrote:
Gwaihir wrote:
A Serious Man - 3.5 Stars

The Coens are so maddening, first and foremost because trying to pick favorites from their catalog is an exercise in frustration.

I'm fairly certain that Barton Fink is their greatest effort... but the second place position is such a damn contest. A Serious Man is definitely a contender.


I still need to see Barton Fink, because I've been laboring under the misapprehension that Fargo was their best film. A Serious Man, I agree, is right up there though.

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Tue Jun 11, 2013 7:25 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Syd Henderson wrote:
It (1927) Clara Bow plays Pennywise, an evil clown who disguises himself as a spunky shopgirl so he/she can lure millionaires to his/her lair where they are seduced and devoured. Bow is very convincing despite having eight sexy legs and five expressive eyes. The screams continued in "It Happened One Night, "It Conquered the World" and "Whip It."

Tired of playing the same roles, Bow retired to a ranch in Montana to consume her victims at leisure. Her fame remains strong among those for whom the phrase "It Girl" has a dark and sinister meaning. (6.5 of 10)


Heh. I laughed

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JackBurns wrote:

Frances Ha (2012) 3.5/4

I never got or reciprocated the love for Lena Dunham’s Tiny Furniture. The humor never worked for me, and it ultimately felt like an empty, failed attempt at creating a homage to Woody Allen. Frances Ha is different. This film captures the insecure mindset and outlook of the average college graduate in a light, moving way. It’s easy to sympathize with our protagonist. Many of us have felt the same emotions conveyed in this film. The twenty-something life crisis is real, and Frances Ha conveys it in a beautiful way. While the end of the third act rushes the narrative along a bit too quickly, this film is a pure joy to watch.


Excellent. Think I'll go out of my way for this one then.

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Tue Jun 11, 2013 7:26 am
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