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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
Jeff Wilder wrote:
Southland TalesThe fact that it requires you to read three graphic novels prior to watching in order to make sense speaks of the hubris.
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Oh, was that where I went wrong. I don't remember seeing that mentioned in trailers/posters/DVD jacket. I found Southland Tales to completely incomprehensible, now I finally know why.

The novels may explain the film better, but they don't make the film itself any better. I'm all for being ambitious, but this is one script I really wish Hollywood execs had either shot down in a hurry or at least re-tooled it so the average person could make sense of it without having to read THREE freaking novels.


Sun Apr 21, 2013 11:17 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Tsotsi was the second film in a double feature with The Three Lives of Thomasina, which is an odd couple, but that happens when two people order films from Netflix.

I hadn't seen Thomasina since I was a child, but I still remembered the scene in cat heaven with Bast and all the Siamese cats. Anyway, Patrick McGoohan plays Andrew McDhui, a town veterinarian in Scotland who is great with "useful" animals, but is insensitive to the love people feel for their pets. Karen Dotrice is his daughter Mary, who is deeply attached to her cat Thomasina. However, Thomasina suffers an injury and is stiff and in pain, and McDhui, who is busy with a seeing-eye dog that's been run over, sees how stiff Thomasina is, casually diagnoses her with tetanus, and orders his assistant to put her to sleep. This shatters Mary's faith in her father, and when the kids in town stage a funeral, Mary feels it's her father she's burying.

However, local "witch" Lori MacGregor (Susan Hampshire) inadvertently interrupts the funeral and scares the kids away. She discovers Thomasina is still alive and takes the cat to her cabin where she weaves and administers first aid and love to injured animals. Thomasina's lost her memories of her first life, but keeps having these nagging feelings.

I loved this as a kid, and it's really best when you're young or have kids. It's sentimental, but it has some very good scenes about veterinary practice in 1912, and the need for both skill and caring when working with animals. Susan Hampshire is charming, lovely and has a pretty singing voice as well. She joins in on "Loch Lomond," Thomasina's funeral song, and I had tears in my eyes. (Which is odd, because I never felt that way about the song before.)

Karen Dotrice and Matthew Garber, who plays Mary's young friend Geordie, are best known for playing the children in Mary Poppins. Susan Hampshire would go on to win three Emmies in four years in the early 70s, notably for The Forsyth Saga and The First Churchills. McGoohan, you've probably heard of. (6.5 for general public, 7.5 for kids and parents.)

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Two Jakes (1990)
Years after the events shown in the classic movie ‘Chinatown’, private eye Jake Gittes (Jack Nicholson) is running a formidable investigaton business, although he still personally takes on the odd adultery case. In the case of Jake Berman (Harvey Keitel), Gittes is simply supposed to orchestrate a situation, in which his client will interrupt a tête-à-tête between Berman’s wife and her lover, so Gittes can make a sound recording. Unexpectedly, the other Jake packs a gun and shoots his rival and, as it turns out, business partner in a property developing scheme. Soon, Gittes starts to suspect that there is more to the crime than an act of jealousy and he finds a connection to past events, which still haunt him.
You’ve read this correctly: ‘Chinatown’, which must be one of the movies least suitable for a continuation of their story, has a sequel. My interest in ‘The Two Jakes’ was piqued even further by the fact that the same writer, producer and star involved in ‘Chinatown’ were at work here, too. The only notable absence is Roman Polanski, whose directing duties are fulfilled by none other than Jack Nicholson himself!
Of course, ‘The Two Jakes’ isn’t nearly as good as ‘Chinatown’. Few movies are. Nevertheless, it’s nice to see Jake Gittes back in action, although he has become slightly less cynical and more remorseful with age. The unnecessary continuation of the story begun in ‘Chinatown’ makes some sense, too, although you don’t really have to have seen ‘Chinatown’ before watching ‘The Two Jakes’. In fact, knowing ‘Chinatown’ may make you appreciate ‘The Two akes’ less, because the latter movie doesn’t have the same depth and edge to it. It’s still a pretty good detective story and one of the better neo noirs, which I have seen. 7/10

Days of Heaven (1978)
After accidentally killing a man in a fight, Bill (Richard Gere) and his lover Abby (Brooke Adams), who he is passing of as his sister, as well his real younger sister flee depression era Chicago and head south, taking up work as farmhands in the Texan panhandle. When Bill overhears that the wealthy farmer (Sam Shepard) has a terminal illness and is expected to only live another year, he convinces Abby to accept the farmer’s advances and to marry him so they may strike it rich once the farmer dies. Of course, the farmer’s health improves and he also starts to notice that Bill and Abby don’t exactly behave like siblings.
The basic plot could have been taken from a 1940ies film noir with men’s eyes being shadowed by the brims of their fedoras and cigarette smoke curling towards low ceilings in badly lit rooms until past misdemeanours catch up with the protagonist’s past. Because ‘Days of Heaven’ is a Terrence Malick picture, we are treated to gorgeous pictures of wide open prairie, pheasants and hares hiding in the grass and endless fields of wheat, instead. The movie’s outdoor scenes have been filmed in the morning or evening twilight, which makes the film extraordinary beautiful to look at and enhances its elegiac mood. Just like in all other Malick movies, which I have seen, plot is secondary to mood, if of any importance at all, and the characters are kept at a distance, which hurts ‘Days of Heaven’ a little, because the love triangle is after all based on human emotions. It doesn’t help that much of the plot is conveyed by a voiceover by the young sister. This is also a technique typical for Terrence Malick’s films, but it only worked well in ‘Badlands’ while coming across as terribly prententious and laughably self-important in ‘The Thin Red Line’ and ‘The Tree of Life’. (I fell asleep every time I tried to watch ‘The New World’, so I cannot comment on that one.) In ‘Days of Heaven’, the voiceover could have easily been omitted if Malick had chosen to include only a little bit more dialogue. Actually, now that I’m thinking about it, the whole “little sister” character could have been omitted without a loss of quality. Quite on the contrary, without the girl character, the (actually rather short) film could have ended earlier and disposed of the rubbish ending.
While ‘Days of Heaven’ has its fair share of problems, it cannot be overemphathised how great it is to look at this film. The cinematography is simply stunning and has been justly awarded an Oscar. Also, the Ennio Moricone soundtrack is fantastic and greatly helps in setting the mood. The acting is all fine, even by Richard Gere, whom I’m normally not very fond of. (It doesn’t help that UK fim critic Mark Kermode once described Gere’s acting style as “blinking and breathing” and now I notice Gere’s ticks blinking and exhaling - every time I see one of his performances.) So if you can tolerate a lack of interest in the plot by the filmmaker and mostly interested in visuals, you’re in for a treat. Overall, I consider this to be not qite a masterpiece, but still a very good movie, in spite of its problems. 8/10

Bringing out the Dead (1999)
Burnt-out New York paramedic Frank Pierce (Nicolas Cage) has to endure three successive nightshifts with changing partners (played, inter alia, by John Goodman and Ving Rhames) while battling his own demons: He hasn’t saved anybody’s life in months and desperately hopes that a heart-attack victim, who is hospitalised on his first day of duty and with whom’s daughter (Patricia Arquette) he strikes up a relationship, will survive the ordeal - or be put out of his misery.
Having now seen 16 movies by Martin Scorsese, I feel qualified to state that ‘Bringing out the Dead’ is a second-tier movie in his filmography. Second-rate Scorsese is still pretty good, though. The screenplay by Paul Schrader and that fact that the action mostly takes place in New York’s underbelly at night invite comparison with ‘Taxi Driver’, but the similarities end there, because Nicolas Cage’s Frank may be on the edge due to sleep deprivation, stress and depression, but he isn’t a socially alienated and borderline psychotic character like Travis Bickle. Speaking of Nicolas Cage: He seems to be the go-to guy for direct to video schlock these days and he is sleepwalking though a lot of these roles, which has greatly damaged his reputaton as a fine actor. ‘Bringing out the Dead’ shows that he can be excellent in the right role, because the whole movie hinges on his performance and he carries it off. The acting is fine throughout in general I particularly liked Ving Rhames’s turn. It could be argued that the film is over-directed, i.e. that it is flashy in parts and that the direction is calling attention to itself. However, I’d argue that Scorsese wanted to create a feverish, nightmarish atmosphere and that his directorial flourishes help him to achieve this aim. ‘Bringing out the Dead’ is not a realistic depiction of a paramedic’s daily routine, but I didn’t mind that because it serves as an antidote, a sort of counter-fiction, to what is being served up in TV series such as ‘ER’. To sum up, ‘Bringing out the Dead’ is a good and engaging film, just don’t expect a ‘Raging Bull’ or ‘GoodFellas’. 7/10

Our Man in Havana (1959)
Jim Wormold (Alec Guiness) is a British expat vacuum cleaner salesman in pre-revolutionary Havana, who is troubled by financial problems and the affections shown to his daughter by the ruthless captain of police. When he is offered to work for the British secret service, he gladly takes the money and starts to invent a network of spies - with unforeseen consequences.
Direction by Carol Reed, screenplay by Graham Greene (based on his novel, only released a year before the movie) this is the writer/director team, which gave us ‘The Third Man’! Nevertheless, ‘Our Man in Havana’ is completely different in tone, although Mr. Reed was surely fond of tilting the camera a lot. In contrast to’The Third Man’, it is mostly a comedic story with a satirical edge concerning government bureaucracy, but ‘Our Man in Havana’ also has three-dimensional characters and real drama as well as a little dash of suspense. All of these aspects are intertwined expertly and the movie manages to be consistently funny throughout while also making the dramatic scenes work. This is greatly helped by a fantastic cast (Burt Ives, Noel Coward, Maureen O’Hara) and first and foremost Alec Guiness, who gives an acting masterclass. It is a shame that he will probably be most fondly remembered as Obi-Wan Kenobi rather than for a more challenging role. The movie looks great in crisp black and white and the filming on location in Cuba helps to establish the atmosphere really well. The only negative thing to say about this movie is that the story works a little bit better on page than on screen, but that shouldn’t keep anybody from watching the movie. Very good: 8/10


Mon Apr 22, 2013 11:13 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Unke wrote:
Our Man in Havana (1959)
Jim Wormold (Alec Guiness) is a British expat vacuum cleaner salesman in pre-revolutionary Havana, who is troubled by financial problems and the affections shown to his daughter by the ruthless captain of police. When he is offered to work for the British secret service, he gladly takes the money and starts to invent a network of spies - with unforeseen consequences.
Direction by Carol Reed, screenplay by Graham Greene (based on his novel, only released a year before the movie) this is the writer/director team, which gave us ‘The Third Man’! Nevertheless, ‘Our Man in Havana’ is completely different in tone, although Mr. Reed was surely fond of tilting the camera a lot. In contrast to’The Third Man’, it is mostly a comedic story with a satirical edge concerning government bureaucracy, but ‘Our Man in Havana’ also has three-dimensional characters and real drama as well as a little dash of suspense. All of these aspects are intertwined expertly and the movie manages to be consistently funny throughout while also making the dramatic scenes work. This is greatly helped by a fantastic cast (Burt Ives, Noel Coward, Maureen O’Hara) and first and foremost Alec Guiness, who gives an acting masterclass. It is a shame that he will probably be most fondly remembered as Obi-Wan Kenobi rather than for a more challenging role. The movie looks great in crisp black and white and the filming on location in Cuba helps to establish the atmosphere really well. The only negative thing to say about this movie is that the story works a little bit better on page than on screen, but that shouldn’t keep anybody from watching the movie. Very good: 8/10


This sounds really interesting. I didn't realize there was another Reed/Greene collaboration outside of The Third Man and The Fallen Idol. Will definitely have to check this one out.

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Mon Apr 22, 2013 5:06 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Once Upon a time in Anatolia

This is a unique film. Its plot is minimal, it's very long, and moves slowly...but I didn't find it boring. Nor did I find it a mind-blowing experience. I thought the conversations and character exchanges were interesting, but ultimately this rates as decent.

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Mon Apr 22, 2013 6:19 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Unke wrote:
The Two Jakes (1990)
Years after the events shown in the classic movie ‘Chinatown’, private eye Jake Gittes (Jack Nicholson) is running a formidable investigaton business, although he still personally takes on the odd adultery case. In the case of Jake Berman (Harvey Keitel), Gittes is simply supposed to orchestrate a situation, in which his client will interrupt a tête-à-tête between Berman’s wife and her lover, so Gittes can make a sound recording. Unexpectedly, the other Jake packs a gun and shoots his rival and, as it turns out, business partner in a property developing scheme. Soon, Gittes starts to suspect that there is more to the crime than an act of jealousy and he finds a connection to past events, which still haunt him.
You’ve read this correctly: ‘Chinatown’, which must be one of the movies least suitable for a continuation of their story, has a sequel. My interest in ‘The Two Jakes’ was piqued even further by the fact that the same writer, producer and star involved in ‘Chinatown’ were at work here, too. The only notable absence is Roman Polanski, whose directing duties are fulfilled by none other than Jack Nicholson himself!
Of course, ‘The Two Jakes’ isn’t nearly as good as ‘Chinatown’. Few movies are. Nevertheless, it’s nice to see Jake Gittes back in action, although he has become slightly less cynical and more remorseful with age. The unnecessary continuation of the story begun in ‘Chinatown’ makes some sense, too, although you don’t really have to have seen ‘Chinatown’ before watching ‘The Two Jakes’. In fact, knowing ‘Chinatown’ may make you appreciate ‘The Two akes’ less, because the latter movie doesn’t have the same depth and edge to it. It’s still a pretty good detective story and one of the better neo noirs, which I have seen. 7/10


Thanks for reviewing this. I had it on my queue for a while before admitting that I just didn't want to watch it. I'm too afraid it would be like what happened when I read the belated, poor sequel to the great Watership Down (Tales from Watership Down) and I just felt vaguely depressed

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Mon Apr 22, 2013 10:12 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Trance (2013) 2.5/4

A dirty throwback to classic Boyle style—with this style intact Boyle delivers an entertaining film that sadly gets extremely messy, delivering a ball buster of a third act that hinges too much on an almost science fiction notion.

The Place Beyond the Pines (2012) 3.5/4

Derek Cianfrance proved that he could masterfully examine the destruction of a complicated relationship with Blue Valentine. Like Blue Valentine, The Place Beyond The Pines crafts excellent, grounded relationships. These relationships ultimately form an epic scaled father-son story that encompasses moral issues along with an interesting display of grief. While the third act falters a bit, this film creates such a compelling atmosphere that completely captured my attention from the brilliant opening sequence to its cyclical ending. Easily the best film of 2013 so far.

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Tue Apr 23, 2013 1:30 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Trance - The latest effort from Oscar-winning director Danny Boyle had been sitting on the shelf for a little while. Normally a delayed release signals a lack of confidence from the studios in a film's quality, but the circumstances surrounding Boyle's film are different. After a series of casting changes, principal photography was completed back in 2011 before Boyle went off to handle Olympic opening ceremony duties, and when all that was done he came back to finish up post-production. Still, even though the film had a perfectly legitimate reason for sitting on the shelf awhile, some of the negative associations with normal delayed releases unfortunately ring true here as well. It's a film that was more than likely green-lighted based on the success of Inception, a stylish, sexy crime thriller that uses dreams and memory as its core narrative hooks. But apart from a couple genuinely bizarre and memorable story elements (including a fairly extraordinary nude scene from Rosario Dawson that seems to come out of nowhere), most of the material in the film consists of riffs on ideas done better elsewhere.

Still though, the film is fun enough for the first hour, in its own inconsequential way. But what initially starts as a jaunty and cheerfully-violent venture eventually morphs into a kind of sub-Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind exposé on the memories of a fractured relationship, and when this shift into darker territory occurs it sort of takes the wind out of the film's sails. It's interesting to watch as the script constantly subverts your feelings towards each character (Vincent Cassel plays his usual skuzzy criminal role, but he actually garners the most sympathy as events progress), but in the end it's all just a little too exhausting for not much in the way of a payoff. In some ways, it feels like the work of a younger, less confident filmmaker, instead of an established name with several noteworthy titles to their credit. Fans of the director should find enough material of interest in the film, but it's tough to shake the feeling it's nothing more than a bridge between more worthwhile efforts. 4/10.

Sound Of My Voice - Brit Marling is one of the more interesting news names in independent film at the moment. She made a big breakthrough in 2011 at the Sundance film festival with two films she both starred in and co-wrote, the somewhat-noodly, vaguely sci-fi drama, Another Earth, and this somewhat-noodly, vaguely sci-fi drama, Sound Of My Voice. Both films use subtle sci-fi elements as extra flavoring to stories of people attempting to cope with past tragedy. In the former film, Marling played a young woman who was responsible for the deaths of a mother and child in a car accident, and who attempts to reconnect with the grieving father, while an alternate version of the Earth hovers above them. In this film, she plays a cult leader who claims to be from the future, while two documentarians, one of whom has a tragedy in his past linked to cult obsession, infiltrate the ranks to expose her true nature.

In its best moments, Sound Of My Voice reminded me of recent films like Martha Marcy May Marlene and Kill List, films that slowly and subtly built atmospheres of uneasy horror. This one is a little less successful, in part because it has a bit of a hard time connecting all the pieces together in a way that is successful. The film consistently jumps about awkwardly in tone. The scenes within the cult can be quietly unsettling, but they can also be somewhat comic, or sometimes a mixture of both at the same time, particularly in a scene that makes memorable use of the song 'Dreams' by the Cranberries. An over-elaborate handshake initiation also dissolves much of the potential tension, but it ends up playing a crucial role in the endgame. Speaking of the ending, it's one of those finales that changes the perspective of everything that has come before, but like the rest of the film, it comes and goes too quickly to really register as anything substantial. At under 90 minutes, the film could have used extra time to give everything more weight; instead, it all feels more like a rough sketch of an idea rather than a fully-realized piece. It's worth watching for Marling, who might break out soon as a major talent. 6/10.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Lords of Salem

I give it a D- or 1 star out of 4.


I appreciate Rob Zombie trying to go for the slow burn route and there are a few moments of quiet eeriness here and there. Unfortunately, Zombie has no real sense of pacing. The first 2/3rd's are mostly just slow and dull, with occasional moments of cheesiness but then for the last 20 minutes, it completely lost me going so over the top that it was just laughably bad. It's not scary nor disturbing, just unintentionally funny. And not even that funny. It just felt weird for the sake of weirdness. It was totally awful.

It's not as bad as Halloween II. That still remains the career nadir for Zombie. But it comes awfully close. Worst movie of the year so far. I'm starting to wonder if Zombie will ever make a good movie. Guess not.


Wed Apr 24, 2013 7:01 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JackBurns wrote:
Trance (2013) 2.5/4

A dirty throwback to classic Boyle style—with this style intact Boyle delivers an entertaining film that sadly gets extremely messy, delivering a ball buster of a third act that hinges too much on an almost science fiction notion.


Blonde Almond wrote:
Trance - it's tough to shake the feeling it's nothing more than a bridge between more worthwhile efforts. 4/10.


These kinds of lukewarm/poor reviews seem to be the norm for that movie. Even the positive reviews tend to be on the more lukewarm side. I've been wanting to go see this, but I might wait until it's on Blu Ray or Netflix. It sounds like a gigantic step down from 127 Hours, which I thought was an absolute masterpiece, and easily his best film. That's pretty disappointing.

JackBurns wrote:
The Place Beyond the Pines (2012) 3.5/4

Derek Cianfrance proved that he could masterfully examine the destruction of a complicated relationship with Blue Valentine. Like Blue Valentine, The Place Beyond The Pines crafts excellent, grounded relationships. These relationships ultimately form an epic scaled father-son story that encompasses moral issues along with an interesting display of grief. While the third act falters a bit, this film creates such a compelling atmosphere that completely captured my attention from the brilliant opening sequence to its cyclical ending. Easily the best film of 2013 so far.


Well said, and agreed. The thing about the last shot that I haven't really seen mentioned much anywhere, is how it's virutally the exact opposite of the opening shot. The movie opens with the camera following Gosling as he walks to his motorcycle and rides it into the cage with the 2 other stuntmen and goes round and round (an obvious metaphor for the cyclical ideas the film is going to show us). The final shot is a static camera watching Gosling's son as he rides off into the distance on his own motorcycle. Many have put forth that it's the film telling us he's doomed to repeat the sins of his father, but I like to think there's at least a smidge of hope in that final shot since it's so drastically different to the opening.

ilovemovies wrote:
The Lords of Salem

I give it a D- or 1 star out of 4.


I appreciate Rob Zombie trying to go for the slow burn route and there are a few moments of quiet eeriness here and there. Unfortunately, Zombie has no real sense of pacing. The first 2/3rd's are mostly just slow and dull, with occasional moments of cheesiness but then for the last 20 minutes, it completely lost me going so over the top that it was just laughably bad. It's not scary nor disturbing, just unintentionally funny. And not even that funny. It just felt weird for the sake of weirdness. It was totally awful.

It's not as bad as Halloween II. That still remains the career nadir for Zombie. But it comes awfully close. Worst movie of the year so far. I'm starting to wonder if Zombie will ever make a good movie. Guess not.


I can't say I'm completely surprised to hear this, but I honestly do want to like Zombie the director. I genuinely liked The Devil's Rejects (and Scott Tobias gives the film a hell of a defense here), but his other movies have just been horrible. I probably only want to like him because I want my own appreciation of his one movie I like validated. There's really no other reason I can think of to care about him.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
PeachyPete wrote:
ilovemovies wrote:
The Lords of Salem

I give it a D- or 1 star out of 4.


I appreciate Rob Zombie trying to go for the slow burn route and there are a few moments of quiet eeriness here and there. Unfortunately, Zombie has no real sense of pacing. The first 2/3rd's are mostly just slow and dull, with occasional moments of cheesiness but then for the last 20 minutes, it completely lost me going so over the top that it was just laughably bad. It's not scary nor disturbing, just unintentionally funny. And not even that funny. It just felt weird for the sake of weirdness. It was totally awful.

It's not as bad as Halloween II. That still remains the career nadir for Zombie. But it comes awfully close. Worst movie of the year so far. I'm starting to wonder if Zombie will ever make a good movie. Guess not.




I can't say I'm completely surprised to hear this, but I honestly do want to like Zombie the director. I genuinely liked The Devil's Rejects (and Scott Tobias gives the film a hell of a defense here), but his other movies have just been horrible. I probably only want to like him because I want my own appreciation of his one movie I like validated. There's really no other reason I can think of to care about him.


I liked The Devil's Rejects. It's the one Rob Zombie film I can say I found good (unless you count his Grindhouse trailer).

Sure TDR is gory as hell. But that's the point. Sure it has a nihilistic tone. But that's the point. Zombie set out to make the goriest most nihilistic throwback to 70s exploitation movies that he could and he damn well succeeded. Plus the humor mixed in well unlike in House Of 10000 Corpses where the humor and horror didn't mesh that well.

The rest of ZOmbie's output (cinematically anyway: Musicwise I liked White Zombie and own two albums by them even though I could never get into his solo work) ranges from mediocre (the aforementioned House, Halloween) to awful (Halloween II).

I once read about an October 1980 issue of Satuday Review that had a picture on the cover of Martin Scorsese, Brian De Palma, Paul Schrader and Walter Hill underteh headline "The Brutalists: Making Movies Mean And Ugly". I would not be surprised if a similar cover appeared today with a picture of Tarantino, Rodriguez, Roth and Zombie.

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Wed Apr 24, 2013 9:59 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
American: The Bill Hicks Story

Although I had never seen or heard Bill Hicks' comedy, I had read of him being called one of the great comedians. That Denis Leary ripped him off. That he had opened for Tool. That his style influenced many, many other comedians. I was hoping to get to see some of his material on this documentary on the man...and I did, but very little of it as the film focused more on the biography of Mr. Hicks. Using archive footage, interviews and still photography animation, it gets into the details of his life (apparently never seen before) and how it shaped his comedy. This would be an interesting watch for those of you who are a fan of his. For me, I'm gonna see about finding Rant in E Minor.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
ram1312 wrote:
American: The Bill Hicks Story

Although I had never seen or heard Bill Hicks' comedy, I had read of him being called one of the great comedians. That Denis Leary ripped him off. That he had opened for Tool. That his style influenced many, many other comedians. I was hoping to get to see some of his material on this documentary on the man...and I did, but very little of it as the film focused more on the biography of Mr. Hicks. Using archive footage, interviews and still photography animation, it gets into the details of his life (apparently never seen before) and how it shaped his comedy. This would be an interesting watch for those of you who are a fan of his. For me, I'm gonna see about finding Rant in E Minor.

I wouldn't say Leary ripped him off, though I have heard stories about how comedy clubs would refuse to book both of them on the same night because of how similar their acts were.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
ilovemovies wrote:
The Lords of Salem

I give it a D- or 1 star out of 4.


I appreciate Rob Zombie trying to go for the slow burn route and there are a few moments of quiet eeriness here and there. Unfortunately, Zombie has no real sense of pacing. The first 2/3rd's are mostly just slow and dull, with occasional moments of cheesiness but then for the last 20 minutes, it completely lost me going so over the top that it was just laughably bad. It's not scary nor disturbing, just unintentionally funny. And not even that funny. It just felt weird for the sake of weirdness. It was totally awful.

It's not as bad as Halloween II. That still remains the career nadir for Zombie. But it comes awfully close. Worst movie of the year so far. I'm starting to wonder if Zombie will ever make a good movie. Guess not.

I actually both of his Halloween films, but I did not care for House For 1000 Corpses, that one just mostly fell flat for me, Lords Of Salem dosen't sound terribly impressive.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blonde Almond wrote:
Sound Of My Voice - Brit Marling is one of the more interesting news names in independent film at the moment. She made a big breakthrough in 2011 at the Sundance film festival with two films she both starred in and co-wrote, the somewhat-noodly, vaguely sci-fi drama, Another Earth, and this somewhat-noodly, vaguely sci-fi drama, Sound Of My Voice. Both films use subtle sci-fi elements as extra flavoring to stories of people attempting to cope with past tragedy. In the former film, Marling played a young woman who was responsible for the deaths of a mother and child in a car accident, and who attempts to reconnect with the grieving father, while an alternate version of the Earth hovers above them. In this film, she plays a cult leader who claims to be from the future, while two documentarians, one of whom has a tragedy in his past linked to cult obsession, infiltrate the ranks to expose her true nature.

In its best moments, Sound Of My Voice reminded me of recent films like Martha Marcy May Marlene and Kill List, films that slowly and subtly built atmospheres of uneasy horror. This one is a little less successful, in part because it has a bit of a hard time connecting all the pieces together in a way that is successful. The film consistently jumps about awkwardly in tone. The scenes within the cult can be quietly unsettling, but they can also be somewhat comic, or sometimes a mixture of both at the same time, particularly in a scene that makes memorable use of the song 'Dreams' by the Cranberries. An over-elaborate handshake initiation also dissolves much of the potential tension, but it ends up playing a crucial role in the endgame. Speaking of the ending, it's one of those finales that changes the perspective of everything that has come before, but like the rest of the film, it comes and goes too quickly to really register as anything substantial. At under 90 minutes, the film could have used extra time to give everything more weight; instead, it all feels more like a rough sketch of an idea rather than a fully-realized piece. It's worth watching for Marling, who might break out soon as a major talent. 6/10.


Nice review. I think I probably liked it a bit more than you, though. The film is not that substantial, but it did stay with me for a while. Good performances from most of the cast. All around, a solid and interesting watch.

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Wed Apr 24, 2013 7:24 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
A couple overdue thoughts on two classics:

All About Eve - Over the past week, I finally caught up with two undisputed cinema classics, both of which revolve around the world of theater, and neither of them fell short of expectations. The first is this 1950 film from director Joseph L. Mankiewicz, a film that forgoes much in the way of onstage action in favor of backstage politics. A film like this really comes down to script and the characters, and fortunately All About Eve excels in both those areas. The portrayal of relationships within the theater world is extremely cynical, not very surprising considering the film’s main characters consist of an alcoholic star past her prime, a manipulative up-and-comer, and a dominating critic. The script never shows much in the way of favoritism, letting each one of these compelling personalities have enough screen-time to register.

Most of the attention over the years has gone towards Bette Davis, who sinks her teeth into her role of the aging star Margo Channing with relish, but I found Anne Baxter’s performance as the title character to be equally impressive. An early scene when Eve tells the story of her past initially seems at first a little visually flat due to the decision by Mankiewicz to not embellish her words with any accompanying flashbacks, but Baxter sells it through the intensity and subtly off-putting forthrightness of her performance. Roger Ebert puts it beautifully in his Great Movies review, when he writes of “the girl whose look is a little too intense, whose eyes a little too focused, whose modesty is somehow suspect.” Along with those two, you also have George Sanders stealing every scene he’s in as the theater critic Addison DeWitt, in a performance that won him an Oscar. He ends up as the most sinister presence in the film, a man who knows he has power and uses it to control the fates of any rising talent. Perhaps the film’s best achievement is being able to juggle everyone around without anyone coming off as neglected and underused. Hell, there’s even enough room made for an early Marilyn Monroe performance, who comes in briefly as the current object of DeWitt’s fascination. It’s not a short film by any means, but the time flies by and you feel at the end you could have spent even longer in the company of these characters. 10/10.

Children Of Paradise - The second theater-related classic I watched in the past week is this 1945 effort from director Marcel Carné, considered to be one of the greatest French films ever made. The film has a history of being compared with Gone With The Wind, and indeed both films have an epic sweep to them that few films have ever come close to replicating. But where that film dealt more with the roles of wealthy Southerners during wartime, this film focuses mainly on entertainers living in poverty and struggling to get by. Set in the Boulevard of Crime, the film follows these eclectic characters, mostly performers and criminals, and the relationships that emerge between them, usually revolving around the beautiful and enigmatic Garance (played by French icon Arletty), with four men competing for her attention. The narrative is essentially melodrama, albeit very effective melodrama, with characters you care end up caring about and wishing for their success. But what really separates the film from the pack is the direction. Much of the time in this 190-minute epic is spent watching onstage performances, and a common theme throughout the film is how the onstage and offstage personas often intersect with each other. There are many wonderful moments throughout the film when a performance will be interrupted by something offstage, breaking the illusion the performer is trying to create.

Any mention of the film would not be complete with relating a little bit the circumstances under which it was made. Working under Nazi influence in occupied France, Carne was forced to work under extremely limited circumstances. Both resistance members and Nazi sympathizers served as extras. A couple members of the production team were Jewish and had to keep their identities a secret. Apart from all the production issues, the Vichy administrations forbid the release of a film over 90 minutes, so Carne split the film into two parts, titled Boulevard Of Crime and The Man In White, and showed them separately in theaters. It’s unbelievable that the film was able to get made at all, but even without knowing any of the back-story, it’s easy to be impressed with how smoothly everything gels together. Definitely a film that completely warrants its status as an all-time classic. 10/10.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Thief12 wrote:
Blonde Almond wrote:
Sound Of My Voiceans, one of whom has a tragedy in his past linked to cult obsession, infiltrate the ranks to expose her true nature.


Nice review. I think I probably liked it a bit more than you, though. The film is not that substantial, but it did stay with me for a while. Good performances from most of the cast. All around, a solid and interesting watch.


Thanks! I do agree that it is solid and interesting, but I definitely think there are better things to come for Marling. Still though, it's definitely compelling enough for an early effort.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blonde Almond wrote:


Children Of Paradise - The second theater-related classic I watched in the past week is this 1945 effort from director Marcel Carné, considered to be one of the greatest French films ever made. The film has a history of being compared with Gone With The Wind, and indeed both films have an epic sweep to them that few films have ever come close to replicating. But where that film dealt more with the roles of wealthy Southerners during wartime, this film focuses mainly on entertainers living in poverty and struggling to get by. Set in the Boulevard of Crime, the film follows these eclectic characters, mostly performers and criminals, and the relationships that emerge between them, usually revolving around the beautiful and enigmatic Garance (played by French icon Arletty), with four men competing for her attention. The narrative is essentially melodrama, albeit very effective melodrama, with characters you care end up caring about and wishing for their success. But what really separates the film from the pack is the direction. Much of the time in this 190-minute epic is spent watching onstage performances, and a common theme throughout the film is how the onstage and offstage personas often intersect with each other. There are many wonderful moments throughout the film when a performance will be interrupted by something offstage, breaking the illusion the performer is trying to create.

Any mention of the film would not be complete with relating a little bit the circumstances under which it was made. Working under Nazi influence in occupied France, Carne was forced to work under extremely limited circumstances. Both resistance members and Nazi sympathizers served as extras. A couple members of the production team were Jewish and had to keep their identities a secret. Apart from all the production issues, the Vichy administrations forbid the release of a film over 90 minutes, so Carne split the film into two parts, titled Boulevard Of Crime and The Man In White, and showed them separately in theaters. It’s unbelievable that the film was able to get made at all, but even without knowing any of the back-story, it’s easy to be impressed with how smoothly everything gels together. Definitely a film that completely warrants its status as an all-time classic. 10/10.


Man I really need to see this one

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Iron Man 3 3 1/2 stars
This is now my favourite entry in the Iron Man movie franchise! A lot of fun for the whole family. Centred solely on Iron Man/Tony Stark and with not connection with Avengers 2 although The Avengers gets briefly mentioned. As usual for Marvel films stays after the credits ends to see some extra footage (funny in this case). I saw it in 3D and the conversion was good as it is normally in the case of Marvel Films :-)

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Last edited by unwindfilms on Wed Apr 24, 2013 10:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Wed Apr 24, 2013 10:39 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
unwindfilms wrote:
Iron Man 3 3 1/2 stars
This is now my favourite entry in the Iron Man movie franchise! A lot of fun for the whole family. Centred solely on Iron Man/Tony Stark and with not connection with Avengers 2 although The Avengers gets briefly mentioned. As usual for Marvel films stays after the credits ends to see some extra footage (funny in this case)

Was this an advance screening you got to attend, or has the film opened in Australia?

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