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Unsung Great Films 
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
H.I. McDonough wrote:
Mark III wrote:
My Winnipeg is an unsung, GREAT film. One of my 'best films' of those years 2000-2009, a wonderful meditation on truth, art and truth in art. Among other things. Not only is some of the imagery some of the greatest you're likely to find in a recent film, the movie is sweet and hilarious and thought-provoking and amazing.

Guy Maddin is an unsung great filmmaker in general. He's like if David Lynch made movies during the silent/early talkie era. I don't think "My Winnipeg" ranks among his best, though. I prefer "The Saddest Music in the World," "Brand Upon the Brain!," ""Careful," "Archangel," and "Tales from Gimli Hospital." Maybe even "Cowards Bend the Knee" as well.


I've written some on Maddin and completely support all love directed at his movies. I would put My Winnipeg above every title you've listed though I wouldn't argue it til blue in the face. They're all creative. My Winnipeg is also more conventionally flavorful making it the preferred dish for an introductory lesson.

Haven't seen his latest, Keyhole or something to that end. It's available on Netflix Instant for those who haven't stopped reading or don't make a habit of ignoring support of bizarro film makers.

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Sat Nov 17, 2012 9:18 pm
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
Update: I've knocked out A Simple Plan and Kind Hearts and Coronets over the weekend, and posted my thoughts. I'm hopefully going to be watching Ace In The Hole later tonight, so I will more than likely post my thoughts tomorrow. Keep the recommendations coming!

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Sun Nov 18, 2012 9:22 pm
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
Well you can't go wrong with the amazing

They Shoot Horses, Don't They (1969) in which

desperate contestants in the Great Depression undergo unimaginable agony and indignity in a grueling dance marathon, trying to outlast each other by dancing every hour, every day, every week to win that pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. An unforgettable film

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Sun Nov 18, 2012 9:27 pm
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
Ace in the Hole (1951), recommended by calvero and Sexual Chocolate.

Really, really enjoyed this film. In many ways this film reminded me of the Alexander Mackendrick's Sweet Smell of Success (1957)--both examine the world of the press, and the dark ends that one will go to reach fame and fortune-- perhaps Ace in the Hole paved its way. This film examines the media, and how it can be used as a political and monetary tool. When living in a society where news organizations pride themselves in being the first to report the latest breaking news, Ace in the Hole feels often familiar. A story at any cost, seems to be central to Ace in the Hole, and also parallels our own times-- its not about the despair that is caused by terrible events that may effect people in cruel ways, but rather about if the story can sell, if it can appeal to readers, and spike some sort of gleaning interest. Ace In the Hole offers tight direction, and great social commentary. This is a Billy Wilder film that should not be missed! 3.5/4

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Mon Nov 19, 2012 2:34 pm
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
Quote:
Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949), recommended by many of you.

This day and age a good comedy is hard to come by. Most are overly formulaic, and tend to stick to Blake Snyder's Save The Cat: a 90 page script formula where everything is meant to happen on specific pages for an overall easy writing style(ie couple gets together or friends are presented, they fight, and zaam back together before the final act is over). However,this is a film made long before books were written to closely guide comedians and poor writers to make "comedy art" of their own. Kind Hearts and Coronets is a film that feels truly ahead of its time-- its dark, humorous, and tells an exceptional story of comic revenge. I have nothing but praise for this film. No complaints or nitpicks, or issues to argue over. 4/4


If you liked this, you should check out some of the other Ealing/Alec Guinness movies - The Man in the White Suit, Lavender Hill Mob, Ladykillers.


Tue Nov 27, 2012 2:44 pm
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
JamesKunz wrote:
Well you can't go wrong with the amazing

They Shoot Horses, Don't They (1969) in which

desperate contestants in the Great Depression undergo unimaginable agony and indignity in a grueling dance marathon, trying to outlast each other by dancing every hour, every day, every week to win that pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. An unforgettable film


This. So much this. Never thought a movie about dancing could be so grueling, it feels constantly propelled towards tragedy. This one has stuck with me for a good five years now.

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Tue Nov 27, 2012 4:31 pm
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
calvero wrote:
Quote:
Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949), recommended by many of you.

This day and age a good comedy is hard to come by. Most are overly formulaic, and tend to stick to Blake Snyder's Save The Cat: a 90 page script formula where everything is meant to happen on specific pages for an overall easy writing style(ie couple gets together or friends are presented, they fight, and zaam back together before the final act is over). However,this is a film made long before books were written to closely guide comedians and poor writers to make "comedy art" of their own. Kind Hearts and Coronets is a film that feels truly ahead of its time-- its dark, humorous, and tells an exceptional story of comic revenge. I have nothing but praise for this film. No complaints or nitpicks, or issues to argue over. 4/4


If you liked this, you should check out some of the other Ealing/Alec Guinness movies - The Man in the White Suit, Lavender Hill Mob, Ladykillers.


Not just the Alec Guinness ones-- Whisky Galore, Passport to Pimlico...

Nice to see Ealing Studios making a comeback with Notting Hill, Shaun of the Dead, A Christmas Carol, Burke and Hare...


Tue Nov 27, 2012 5:37 pm
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
Will gladly add My Winnipeg and They Shoot Horses, Don't They

Also watched The War Zone recently which was recommended by one or two of you, and posted my thoughts on "Last Movie Watched" thread.

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Wed Nov 28, 2012 2:51 pm
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
JJoshay wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
Well you can't go wrong with the amazing

They Shoot Horses, Don't They (1969) in which

desperate contestants in the Great Depression undergo unimaginable agony and indignity in a grueling dance marathon, trying to outlast each other by dancing every hour, every day, every week to win that pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. An unforgettable film


This. So much this. Never thought a movie about dancing could be so grueling, it feels constantly propelled towards tragedy. This one has stuck with me for a good five years now.


Right on, brotha

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Wed Nov 28, 2012 6:56 pm
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
John Huston's 1975 The Man Who Would Be King. Kunzie boy will vouch for this delightful treasure as well. It has Sean Connery and Michael Caine as two men who are confused with gods in a small village in Kafiristan; today part of Afghanistan. Christopher Plummer has a smaller role as Rudyard Kipling as well (the film is adapted from his short story of the same name). Wonderful movie, not nearly seen enough.

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Sun Dec 02, 2012 4:11 am
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
JJoshay wrote:
John Huston's 1975 The Man Who Would Be King. Kunzie boy will vouch for this delightful treasure as well. It has Sean Connery and Michael Caine as two men who are confused with gods in a small village in Kafiristan; today part of Afghanistan. Christopher Plummer has a smaller role as Rudyard Kipling as well (the film is adapted from his short story of the same name). Wonderful movie, not nearly seen enough.


Oh you better believe I'll vouch for it. This movie used to make me cry EVERY TIME I watched it. Even after I grew a pair, I still love it

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Sun Dec 02, 2012 11:00 am
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
JamesKunz wrote:
JJoshay wrote:
John Huston's 1975 The Man Who Would Be King. Kunzie boy will vouch for this delightful treasure as well. It has Sean Connery and Michael Caine as two men who are confused with gods in a small village in Kafiristan; today part of Afghanistan. Christopher Plummer has a smaller role as Rudyard Kipling as well (the film is adapted from his short story of the same name). Wonderful movie, not nearly seen enough.


Oh you better believe I'll vouch for it. This movie used to make me cry EVERY TIME I watched it. Even after I grew a pair, I still love it


I'll third, fourth, whatever this one. I love this film. One of my favorites.


Sun Dec 02, 2012 11:30 am
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
Did anyone mention "The Hit" (1984) yet? Not sure if this can be called a great film. I like it a lot. Just check out the great cast. It is definitely rather unsung. I think it is a candidate for qualifying.


Sun Dec 02, 2012 3:58 pm
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
I love The Man Who Would Be King , great great film.

Threeperf35, The Hit will be added!

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Sun Dec 02, 2012 5:54 pm
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
Threeperf35 wrote:
Did anyone mention "The Hit" (1984) yet? Not sure if this can be called a great film. I like it a lot. Just check out the great cast. It is definitely rather unsung. I think it is a candidate for qualifying.


I'll second this one. You're right, it might not be great, but it's a very good underseen movie.


Sun Dec 02, 2012 7:22 pm
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
One very good unsung crime film is Bill Duke's Deep Cover starring Laurence Fishburne and Jeff Goldblum.

Was re-watching it not too long ago and noted how its been forgotten by much of the general public. It really should be better known. The main reason for its eglect nowadays is most likely because ti got released in the mist of teh urban drama boom of the early 90s and kinda got lost in the shuffle. It also didn't help that New Jack City had been released a year earlier and was being regarded by many as a defining film. Today Deep Cover has aged much better and can be seen as a much better film. The characterizations are deeper, the dialogue is a lot better written, the performances are better and Duke has more assured control of the story's trajectory.

So a while back I came across the DVD of it on sale and grabbed it. If you liked or loved The Departed and Donnie Brasco. you'll like this one as well. Bonus: the theme song featured Dr. Dre and Snopp Dogg in their first pairing.

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Tue Apr 09, 2013 9:43 am
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
Jeff Wilder wrote:
One very good unsung crime film is Bill Duke's Deep Cover starring Laurence Fishburne and Jeff Goldblum.

Was re-watching it not too long ago and noted how its been forgotten by much of the general public. It really should be better known. The main reason for its eglect nowadays is most likely because ti got released in the mist of teh urban drama boom of the early 90s and kinda got lost in the shuffle. It also didn't help that New Jack City had been released a year earlier and was being regarded by many as a defining film. Today Deep Cover has aged much better and can be seen as a much better film. The characterizations are deeper, the dialogue is a lot better written, the performances are better and Duke has more assured control of the story's trajectory.

So a while back I came across the DVD of it on sale and grabbed it. If you liked or loved The Departed and Donnie Brasco. you'll like this one as well. Bonus: the theme song featured Dr. Dre and Snopp Dogg in their first pairing.


Unsung "good" movie maybe, but I don't think it touches greatness. Glad you brought it up though. Goldblum's terrific in it

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Tue Apr 09, 2013 11:09 am
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
JamesKunz wrote:
Unsung "good" movie maybe, but I don't think it touches greatness. Glad you brought it up though. Goldblum's terrific in it


Just an off-topic remark. There's a painfully undersued actor: Jeff Goldblum. I hated it when he somehow was suddenly written out of the screenplay in "Jurassic Park". He was the most interesting character in the movie (and he was hitting on Laura Dern and he was getting somewhere, the always insipid and sleepwalking Sam Neill is no match by a long shot). Suddenly: leg injury, out. I love his ability (Spielberg quote BTW) to make written dialog sound and feel like it was ad lib. He has a very strong screen presence too.


Wed Apr 10, 2013 7:08 am
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
Threeperf35 wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
Unsung "good" movie maybe, but I don't think it touches greatness. Glad you brought it up though. Goldblum's terrific in it


Just an off-topic remark. There's a painfully undersued actor: Jeff Goldblum. I hated it when he somehow was suddenly written out of the screenplay in "Jurassic Park". He was the most interesting character in the movie (and he was hitting on Laura Dern and he was getting somewhere, the always insipid and sleepwalking Sam Neill is no match by a long shot). Suddenly: leg injury, out. I love his ability (Spielberg quote BTW) to make written dialog sound and feel like it was ad lib. He has a very strong screen presence too.


He creeps me out. Always has....


Wed Apr 17, 2013 10:56 am
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Post Re: Unsung Great Films
Vexer wrote:
Edward Zwick's The Siege is a truly amazing and eerily presciient film.


Ugh, Bruce Willis (more accurately, his character and what his role in the plot is, but his performance was bad too) utterly ruins this film. The resolution is way too pat and framed in too simplistic terms just so it can have a "Hollywood ending."

Bening was off her game too. Washington and Shalhoub are fantastic as always and the tense scenes are very well done and appropriately tense, but it's impossible to take seriously when the ending drops the ball so badly.

On topic for the thread, I don't know if a Coen film qualifies as unsung, but I recommend The Man Who Wasn't There to anyone. It's not regarded as a Coen classic from what I've seen but I love it, and Tony Shalhoub is dynamite in it. Thinking about The Siege and Pain and Gain brought this one to mind, since I think Shalhoub is one of the more underrated actors working.


Sun Apr 28, 2013 11:45 am
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