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September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion" 
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Post September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
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Tue Sep 27, 2011 10:04 am
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Gaffer

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Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
I live in the UK, and my DVD rental package gets me 4 DVDs/Blu-Rays, plus 4 hours streaming, for £7 per month.

The streaming catalogue is actually pretty good - the Matrix and Pirates of the Caribbean movies are on there (I already own the Matrix and can't stand Pirates of the Caribbean, but it's nice to know you're in high-profile company). Most of the catalogue is pretty obscure, certainly when you're getting to the genre stuff, but there are some really decent high-profile titles on there, if not necessarily anything new (or even new-ish). The '4 hours' rather than '2 titles' per month does make for some awkward maths, though.

My main problem with downloading or streaming from other sources is the sheer cost of it. To rent an HD movie from some sources can cost as much as £5 - why does it have to be this expensive, when a rented Blu-ray through the post is about a third of this?


Tue Sep 27, 2011 10:33 am
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Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
I agree that netflix's streaming selection sucks. And seems like everyday titles are being pulled from my streaming queue and made unavailable. Their timing with the price hikes is terrible. The streaming selection is doing nothing but getting worse not better, so now they decide to hike prices??

The way I see it, eventually traditional tv/satellite service as we know it is going to go away. All content will be delivered over the internet via streaming services. Prices will eventually be jacked up in line with current tv/satellite pricing and we will all be screwed again, and the delivery system will just have shifted. That is all. The transition is on already.


Tue Sep 27, 2011 10:34 am
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Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
I totally agree with James. Not many people, in criticizing Netflix, have pointed out that the streaming catalogue is really limited. I have 159 titles in my queue, and I can safely say that I'm not anxious to watch any of them. In terms of newer films, we can count on Netflix to stream films that were distributed through video on demand in addition to theatrical showings; it seems logical that video-on-demand features would have a symbiosis with streaming. "13 Assassins," "Hobo with a Shotgun," and "I Saw the Devil" are recent examples (unfortunately, none of these are movies James reviewed). Occassionally, a gem like "Breaking Bad" will be released on the streaming service, but they seem to be becoming few and far between.

The other problem I noticed is that some movies seem to stop streaming almost as soon as they start. Look at the Bond films. Earlier this year, nearly all the Bond became available on instant watch. About a month or two later, they were listed in the "unavailable" category. About a month ago, I was excited to see that Bond films would once again be streaming. I thought: good, netflix has solved whatever problem it had with the licenses. However, I looked at the films this week, only to find out that they'll be pulled out of the service come October 1st.


If I didn't have a bountiful selection of titles through my local library, I think I would probably be forced to pay for other streaming services.


Tue Sep 27, 2011 11:14 am
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Gaffer
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Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
I agree that at some point everything will be delivered online in some way but I don't see it happening so soon. There are still a lot of issues that can crop up.

People are going to want to own their movie collections. Buy a disc and you have it to play no matter what. Can't pay your streaming bill your movies are gone, can't afford the internet your movies are gone. And that doesn't even cover slower connections from bad ISP's or bandwidth caps those would all get in the way of streaming being used as the main method of movie watching.


Tue Sep 27, 2011 11:16 am
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Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
To my last message, I want to add that some of the films stream in really bad or mediocre quality. For example, Netflix currently has a contract with Starz, which is set to expire next year. I say good riddance: the Starz films are of the worst quality on the service. The picture is always dim and muddy. In the case of movies like "Far from Heaven" and "Rabbit proof Fence," poor quality can negatively affect the viewing experience, since the image is crucial to the storytelling. The colors should be sharp and vibrant; instead, the low resolution makes it appear as if I'm watching a VHS. Whenever I find out that a high-profile film is streaming under the Starz label, I choose to get the DVD or Blu-Ray instead.e


Tue Sep 27, 2011 11:28 am
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Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
I already paid for Amazon Prime when I still had netflix, but i stuck with netflix anyway because I believed they were the future for movie watching at home. Not so much, any more. Now I just stream with Amazon's prime service - as has been pointed out, raising prices while simultaneously crapifying your services is unbelievably boneheaded.


Tue Sep 27, 2011 11:32 am
Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
I can see I was wise to to cancel my Netflix account, i'd avoided them for years, mostly because it was simply easier and cheaper for me to rent films from one of the local video stores or the library. Then I decided to give thme a chance and i'm thinking, "hey, this is a pretty good deal, I might just stick with them" and of course they go and pull this crap, so I said "sayonara suckers!" and pulled out. Amazon has always been a better option for streaming films, you never see them suddenly take away the option to stream a film then give it back, and Family Video is quickly becoming my default way of seeing films because of their great deals, like if you rent a certain amount of new releases, then for a whole month, ALL of your film rentals are half-price, I was able to rent over a dozen films for around $10 because of that, it's a shame that Family Video is only availible to those in the mid-west, Hollywood Video was an equally good option, too bad they ended up closing for good after being bought out by Movie Gallery(whom also went backrupt). It's pretty ironic that people were once saying that Netflix would be the death for Blockbuster, and now their own online rental service is looking better then Netflix, you can get new releases 28 days before Netflix and Redbox get them for only 19.99 a month(after a 30 day trial), and i'm seriously considering getting an account with them.


Tue Sep 27, 2011 12:31 pm
Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
My family subscribes to Virgin Media's cable service. Included in the cost is access to a huge range of on demand television which regularly changes AND shows things that people actually want to see. The movie pay per view service is roughly £3.99 a movie and in addition to showing a wide range of 'classic' and popular titles, it also shows up to date 'just came out on dvd' as well. The range of HD films is pretty good but mostly newer films. This is how streaming should be done.

I've attempted to stream ONE movie via the internet and it was appalling. Even at slightly less than DVD quality, it continued to stop/start, distort visually etc. What a joke.

I disagree about DVDs/BluRays; they will be around for a while yet!


Tue Sep 27, 2011 2:05 pm
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Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
This discussion came up in another forum and it made me realize that, sadly, movie buffs are in the minority here. The numbers that came back after the price hike revealed that considerably more people were eager to drop the DVD service rather than streaming, which Netflix predicted. I don't think anybody disputes that Netflix's streaming selection for movies is abysmal, but it is pretty good when it comes to TV series, and that's what more Netflix subscribers seem to be into. I don't watch a whole lot of regular television myself. There's a small handful of shows that I watch, but most of the time I prefer watching movies. I joined Netflix a couple of years ago after realizing that a lot of the movies I was eager to rent were nowhere to be found at my local Blockbusters, which seemed to be cutting back on shelf space to accommodate more Blu-rays and TV shows (two of the three nearest to me have since closed). Netflix's DVD selection is excellent, with the only annoyance being the extended wait on some new releases. However someone pointed out that many people will be happy keeping the streaming and using Redbox to rent any new releases they want, with movies on demand filling in the rest. This likely leaves the people who actively seek out specific movies (old and new) in a much smaller percentile, and if the rumors are true that Netflix will eventually drop their DVD service altogether, then that saddens me.


Tue Sep 27, 2011 2:44 pm
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Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
TwistedCritic wrote:
This discussion came up in another forum and it made me realize that, sadly, movie buffs are in the minority here. The numbers that came back after the price hike revealed that considerably more people were eager to drop the DVD service rather than streaming, which Netflix predicted. I don't think anybody disputes that Netflix's streaming selection for movies is abysmal, but it is pretty good when it comes to TV series, and that's what more Netflix subscribers seem to be into. I don't watch a whole lot of regular television myself. There's a small handful of shows that I watch, but most of the time I prefer watching movies. I joined Netflix a couple of years ago after realizing that a lot of the movies I was eager to rent were nowhere to be found at my local Blockbusters, which seemed to be cutting back on shelf space to accommodate more Blu-rays and TV shows (two of the three nearest to me have since closed). Netflix's DVD selection is excellent, with the only annoyance being the extended wait on some new releases. However someone pointed out that many people will be happy keeping the streaming and using Redbox to rent any new releases they want, with movies on demand filling in the rest. This likely leaves the people who actively seek out specific movies (old and new) in a much smaller percentile, and if the rumors are true that Netflix will eventually drop their DVD service altogether, then that saddens me.


When I received an IPod recently I remarked that I would still buy the occasional CD. I have no intention of giving up DVDs for streaming anytime soon.

I've tried streaming. And it does have some good points. But there's also the negative things. One of the most obvious ones is buffering. How many times have you watched a video on youtube and every minute or few minutes it stops and buffers and you have to wait for it to start again. I hate buffering.

i like Netflix DVDs because they (for the most part anyway) have DVDs that Blockbuster's stores didn't have. About 2 years ago a friend of mine mentioned he hadn't seen Do The Right Thing. So he went to Blockbuster to rent it. Blockbuster didn't have it. Not because it was checked out. It wasn't in stock at all. I checked on Netflix to see if they had it. They sure did. I loaned him my copy so he could see it. The local blockbuster near me didn't have Blue Velvet. Netflix does.

Netflix also has quite a few independent films that Blockbuster wouldn't have as well as films that Blockbuster would only have in a chopped up version (IE: Requiem For A Dream and quite a few John Woo action movies).

I think that part of the problem is that Netflix went from being the alternative to Blockbuster to being the Blockbuster. Originally it used to be that you had Blockbuster and maybe an idependent alternative or two (as was the case in my neighborhood). Those days of course are long gone. After killing off or absorbing the bulk of the independents, Blockbuster got cut off at the knees by Netflix. But once Netflix became king of the video rentals, they had to do what Blockbuster did in order to hold on to their power.

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Last edited by Jeff Wilder on Wed Sep 28, 2011 5:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Tue Sep 27, 2011 9:28 pm
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Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
Physical media is on its way out. That much is certain.

My gripes with Netflix streaming include sometimes inaccurate aspect ratios, inconsistent picture quality, and lack of DVD features like extra language options and special features. That's in addition to the limited selection, which would bug me more if I didn't have access to a great independently owned local video store.

I have no doubt that Netflix will begin to address these issues now that it is a streaming-only service.


Tue Sep 27, 2011 10:28 pm
Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
Jeff Wilder wrote:
TwistedCritic wrote:
This discussion came up in another forum and it made me realize that, sadly, movie buffs are in the minority here. The numbers that came back after the price hike revealed that considerably more people were eager to drop the DVD service rather than streaming, which Netflix predicted. I don't think anybody disputes that Netflix's streaming selection for movies is abysmal, but it is pretty good when it comes to TV series, and that's what more Netflix subscribers seem to be into. I don't watch a whole lot of regular television myself. There's a small handful of shows that I watch, but most of the time I prefer watching movies. I joined Netflix a couple of years ago after realizing that a lot of the movies I was eager to rent were nowhere to be found at my local Blockbusters, which seemed to be cutting back on shelf space to accommodate more Blu-rays and TV shows (two of the three nearest to me have since closed). Netflix's DVD selection is excellent, with the only annoyance being the extended wait on some new releases. However someone pointed out that many people will be happy keeping the streaming and using Redbox to rent any new releases they want, with movies on demand filling in the rest. This likely leaves the people who actively seek out specific movies (old and new) in a much smaller percentile, and if the rumors are true that Netflix will eventually drop their DVD service altogether, then that saddens me.


When I received an IPod recently I remarked that I would still buy the occasional CD. I have no intention of giving up DVDs for streaming naytime soon.

I've tried streaming. And it does have some good points. But there's also the negative sings. One of the most obvious ones is buffering. How many yimes have you watched a video on youtube and every minute or few minutes it stops and buffers and you have to wait for it to start again. I hate buffering.

i like Netflix DVDs because they (for the most part anyway) have DVDs that Blockbuster's stores didn't have. About 2 years ago a friend of mine mentioned he hadn't seen Do The Right Thing. So he went to Blockbuster to rent it. Blockbuster didn't have it. Not because it was checked out. It wasn't in stock at all. I checked on Netflix to see if they had it. They sure did. I loaned him my copy so he could see it. The local blockbuster near me didn't have Blue Velvet. Netflix does.

Netflix also has quite a few independent films that Blockbuster wouldn't have as well as films that Blockbuster would only have in a chopped up version (IE: Requiem For A Dream and quite a few John Woo action movies).

I think that part of the problem is that Netflix went from being the alternative to Blockbuster to being the Blockbuster. Originally it used ot be that you had Blockbuster and maybe an idependent alternative or two (as was the case in my neighborhood). Those days of course are long gone. After killing off or absorbing the bulk of the independents, Blockbuster got cut off at the knees by Netflix. But once Netflix became king of the video rentals, they had to do what Blockbuster did in order to hold on to their power.

It looks the tables are turning in Blockbuster's favor, I just saw a new commercial for them which was a blatant take that towards Netflix, they're now offering unlimited DVD, Blu-Ray and video game rentals, along with unlimited in-store exchanges, all that combined with getting new releases a whole month before Redbox(which I don't like) and Netflix comes out to only 9.99 a month, kinda puts Netflix and they're streaming to shame dosen't it? Especially since like you mentioned, some people aren't too fond of streaming, in addition to the buffering issue, there's also the matter of bandwidth, streaming REALLY eats up bandwidth, so I rarely ever watch films online for that reason.


Wed Sep 28, 2011 12:18 am
Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
I am going to stay with Neflix's DVD and streaming service as I don't see any other better options for me right now. When I use the streaming service I use it to catch up on TV shows (Mad Men, the Office etc.) and the obscure films which I found some gems. Especially the ones that are OOP on DVD. The these studios, especially WB, need to open up their vaults and get their films on a streaming service. They hundreds if not thousands of films not available or in their vault. I mean who wants to pay $20 for their on demand archive collection dvds. Seems more economically smart to have Netflix give them a nice check.


Wed Sep 28, 2011 5:02 am
Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
With Amazon's newly announced Kindle Fire I think they are seriously going to make a run for Netflix's streaming. Amazon Prime now needs to get apps on the game systems and more TVs, up their streaming service films a bit, and they look way more attractive than Netflix. Especially with the free 2 day shipping.


Wed Sep 28, 2011 3:00 pm
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Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
virusts wrote:
With Amazon's newly announced Kindle Fire I think they are seriously going to make a run for Netflix's streaming. Amazon Prime now needs to get apps on the game systems and more TVs, up their streaming service films a bit, and they look way more attractive than Netflix. Especially with the free 2 day shipping.


Unless I'm mistaken, Amazon Prime uses flash for their streaming service - can't play it on an iPad. Major disadvantage.


Wed Sep 28, 2011 5:24 pm
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Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
James Berardinelli wrote:
virusts wrote:
With Amazon's newly announced Kindle Fire I think they are seriously going to make a run for Netflix's streaming. Amazon Prime now needs to get apps on the game systems and more TVs, up their streaming service films a bit, and they look way more attractive than Netflix. Especially with the free 2 day shipping.


Unless I'm mistaken, Amazon Prime uses flash for their streaming service - can't play it on an iPad. Major disadvantage.

Most people don't like watching films on an iPad anyways(too damn small) so that dosen't seem like a big deal.


Wed Sep 28, 2011 5:33 pm
Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
James Berardinelli wrote:
virusts wrote:
With Amazon's newly announced Kindle Fire I think they are seriously going to make a run for Netflix's streaming. Amazon Prime now needs to get apps on the game systems and more TVs, up their streaming service films a bit, and they look way more attractive than Netflix. Especially with the free 2 day shipping.


Unless I'm mistaken, Amazon Prime uses flash for their streaming service - can't play it on an iPad. Major disadvantage.


It's not like Amazon would want their streaming service to played on the iPad anyways. Their really only competition to their tablet pc lite. All I see right now is that Amazon is going to get more aggressive with their streaming service than what they have been. Netflix is weak right now and they need to attack while they are down and it seems like they are going to make a run for it.


Thu Sep 29, 2011 12:49 am
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Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
Vexer wrote:
James Berardinelli wrote:
virusts wrote:
With Amazon's newly announced Kindle Fire I think they are seriously going to make a run for Netflix's streaming. Amazon Prime now needs to get apps on the game systems and more TVs, up their streaming service films a bit, and they look way more attractive than Netflix. Especially with the free 2 day shipping.


Unless I'm mistaken, Amazon Prime uses flash for their streaming service - can't play it on an iPad. Major disadvantage.

Most people don't like watching films on an iPad anyways(too damn small) so that dosen't seem like a big deal.


You'd be surprised. 80% of iPad owners say that they regularly/sometimes watch movies on their iPad. It's a terrible way to watch visually sumptuous films, but it's okay for small, independent productions and TV shows. I use it that way when I don't feel like trudging down to my basement home theater.


Thu Sep 29, 2011 11:55 am
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Post Re: September 27, 2011: "The Great Netflix Customer Rebellion"
Well I prefer watching films on my computer most of the time, it's alot easier then squinting to see something on a very small screen, I watched a movie on my PSP once, wasn't that great, don't really see how an iPad is much of an improvement.


Thu Sep 29, 2011 1:34 pm
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