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Films ranked 101-1000 
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Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
I'm in one of those moods. You know, where you're incredibly tired, or you've got a pressing work matter to attend to, etc etc but you can't seem to break yourself away from the internet? Right, where that's where I'm at right now, so I figure I might as well get some mileage out of those internet streak and write up another big ass post. So heeeeeeeeeerrrrrrrrrrre weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee gooooooooooooooooooooooooo.............

Blowup (No. 198) - I don't think anyone makes movies quite like Antonioni does. Certainly, others have copied the style, but no one can copy the coldness of the man's work. If any one film director could be accused of treating his characters like bugs under glass, it's him (Okay, maybe Haneke. Antonioni came first though). So I was suprised when I ended up genuinely liking Blowup. It's not nearly as slow as most of his films (not necessarily a good thing, but oh well), and the culture, no matter how marginalized by the filmmaker (or perhaps because of that), is fascinating. Even a slow film fan such as myself must admit though - the film improved by leaps and bounds once Antonioni added a plot. Still, hell of a fascinating picture. 9/10.

Boogie Nights (No. 584) - Lots of great moments surrounded by shallow connecting material. I kind of wish I could've seen this one on the big screen while it was still out; perhaps all that flamboyance would've gone from shallow to spectacle in the proper environment. Oh well. Sorry Mark. 6/10

The Asphalt Jungle (No. 314) - Why does it seem like just about every noir I see could make a claim to being the "definitive" one? Because hell, I'm pretty sure that The Asphalt Jungle has it all. Heists, bad turns of luck, gritty locations, hard-boiled characters, roughly stylized dialogue, etc etc. Throw in a femme fatale (unless I'm forgetting one that did show up...) and you've got noir 101 right here. It helps that John Huston could direct like a mofo. Hell of an entertaining flick.

Orpheus (No. 202) - Watched twice. The first time I didn't connect to the material at all except for a strech at the beginning. I found it oddly cold, too jumpy in terms of plot and tone, and the line between the magical and the realistic too nonexistent. The second time... well, I still have the same complaints, but I liked it a lot more. There's some real, interesting drama in this flick at the beginning and end, you just have to wade through a lot of symbolic mumbo-jumbo to get there. Not saying the middle is bad, just that there's nothing there that one can connect to during it. It's based on a myth, and it feels about as affecting as one too. (Oh, and I do enjoy Cocteau's cinematic trickery, I just found it sort of useless in this particular film. See The Blood of a Poet and The Testament of Orpheus for the proper setting it should be indulged in) 5/10 for the first watch, 7/10 for the second.

Johnny Guitar (No. 241) - ...Is a very strange film. And by strange, I mean over-the-top. Seriously, was there anything that wasn't taken to the most flamboyant possible degree? The cinematography? Bursting with color! The performances? Raving! The subtext? Practically just a text! The psychosexual undertones? More like over tones, am I right! and so on and so forth. Anyway, the first half was exhilarating, but around the hour mark I started to realize just how, I don't know, obvious it all was. I mean, it's a smart movie, but it doesn't really leave anything for the brain to chew on when it's over. It actually reminded me of Battle Royale in that regard: Both have testicles the size of skyscrapers, but once you get past the uniqueness of either they're just kind of tiring. I still enjoyed myself though, for the most part. 7/10.

I am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (No. 773) - Or, "How the American Justice System Ruined My Life." I mean, you wanna talk about a film with cajones, how about a studio picture from the early 30s that spends most of its running length criticizing the American way of life and making an argument for socialism. Now that's ballsy. The ending is possibly one of the best ever filmed; it's the only one I can think of where I actually said "Oh my God" out loud after it was over. The only problem I saw in this picture is that, being an early talkie, there's not real great sound mixing or editing, but it is adequate. Oh, and the direction and the cinematography are stunning too. Go find this one! 9/10.

Testament of Orpheus (No. 996) - A lot more fun than Orpheus, and a definite predecease to French New Wave. the layers of meta in this film are mind-boggling, but also a lot of fun. Unlike Orpheus, Cocteau consistently keeps the tone light, and the film is much more fun to unwrap and solve because of it. A fun trip for the heart, mind and soul. And as I said above, the cinematic buffoonery is a tone of fun to watch here. 8/10


Last edited by Zeppelin on Thu Apr 01, 2010 6:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Sun Mar 14, 2010 3:04 am
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
Zepp, I actually think that Boogie Nights might just be PTA's best film. Do you feel similarly about his other movies?

Blowup is imho the best movie about perception. I don't like it quite as much as you, but I agree with calling it "fascinating". Spot on with Johnny Guitar too. Saw this very recently and I agree 100%

majoraphasia wrote:
Hello all.

Watching #152 on the list, Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles was an experience that grew so deeply unsettling that the only way to alleviate the nerve-wracking struggle that was Jeanne Dielman's simple existence was to either switch off the movie and pop a tranquilizer or pray she breaks out of her struggle... which, brutally, she does.


Hello.

That title is quite the mouthful. Is it one movie with no breaks? Sounds like it would be split into chunks.


Wed Mar 17, 2010 10:52 am
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
About a week late, for your reading pleasure:

No. 196 Throne of Mother Fucking Blood

First things first - Best. Title. Ever. Nothing will ever be cooler than a movie entitled, Throne of Blood. It's amazing with or without the fucking of mothers. Actually, when put like that, it's much better without the fucking of mothers.

Next - Criterion essays. They're always interesting and these 2 are no different:
http://www.criterion.com/current/posts/270-throne-of-blood-shakespeare-transposed
http://www.criterion.com/current/posts/938-throne-of-blood

Kurosawa's take on Macbeth transports the play to feudal Japan, and leaves the Shakespearian Old English dialogue for the literary folks to handle. The movie is a fairly straightforward telling of Macbeth (with different character names), with a few minor omissions. These changes Kurosawa made go a great deal in strengthening the film adaptation. The story works wonderfully in the context of feudal Japan, both as a narrative and thematically. The lack of Shakespearian dialogue and more concentration on the images in the film is a huge strength. It's an incredibly rich film. Kurosawa takes a great literary work and turns it into a wildly entertaining film, that is still readily open to analysis. Difficult task, indeed.

The film is thematically similar to Macbeth, if not exactly the same. Throne of Blood is more concerned with the cyclical nature of violence in human beings (not that Macbeth isn't, but the movie focuses more on this). Kurosawa is claiming we know and understand much less than we think, and that leads us to behaving so abhorrently. Ambition is normally seen as a noble character trait, but Kurosawa (and the Bard) paints it as a corrupting force. There are quite a few circle motifs shown with various images throughout the film to symbolize this. It reminded me a lot of City of God in that regard, another movie concerned with cycles of violence.

The Criterion essays go into pretty decent detail about the look of the film. It is impeccably shot in black and white and uses light and dark very well. Countless shots are framed perfectly to tell us things about the characters, especially Washizu (Macbeth). There is one amazingly crafted scene after another. Battle scenes, emotional scenes, and scenes with supernatural spirits all hit their marks squarely on the head. Some have called the movie cold, but I found it engaging. It was almost terrifying in some places. Every single scene hits the exact mark it is intended to hit and the subject matter allows for horror, excitement, and reflection. It paints a bleak picture of human beings, but I wouldn't necessarily call it cold.

And then there's Toshiro Mifune. This is the most gloriously over-the-top, scene chewing, wild and entertaining performance I've in a long time. Maybe in forever. As the movie goes and his character is gaining power and respect his performance continuously escalates. You can see the impending doom, yet he keeps going and going, appearing strong even as we all know how incredibly weak and vulnerable he is. You realize everyone he's wronged is coming for his head and the inevitable conclusion is drawing near, but does he? And if he does, does he even care at this point? There is no hint of subtlety or realism to the performance, and its all the better for that. Washizu's story is more about all people and human nature than it is about one individual, so Mifune's over-the-top, somewhat caricatured performance works. I don't think there is an American actor that's ever existed that could pull it off. It's awesome, tragic, incendiary, and distressing at the same time. To do it all so stylishly and wildly is impressive beyond belief. The movie is worth loving for him alone.

This movie has instantly gone on my very, very short list of perfect films. Literally everything the film attempts works wonderfully. There isn't one weak link or criticism I have of anything Kurosawa put on film here. This is a masterpiece in every sense of the word. SEE THIS MOVIE!!!!!!

4 out of 4, 10 out of 10, 8 zillion out of 8 zillion. Just see it and revel in its awesomeness.


Wed Mar 17, 2010 1:08 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
ed_metal_head wrote:

majoraphasia wrote:
Hello all.

Watching #152 on the list, Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles was an experience that grew so deeply unsettling that the only way to alleviate the nerve-wracking struggle that was Jeanne Dielman's simple existence was to either switch off the movie and pop a tranquilizer or pray she breaks out of her struggle... which, brutally, she does.


Hello.

That title is quite the mouthful. Is it one movie with no breaks? Sounds like it would be split into chunks.


It's one movie and, to the best of my knowledge, was originally presented as one 200-minute feature. It remains compulsively watchable for the entire running time.


Wed Mar 17, 2010 1:09 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
PeachyPete wrote:
No. 196 Throne of Mother Fucking Blood

First things first - Best. Title. Ever. Nothing will ever be cooler than a movie entitled, Throne of Blood. It's amazing with or without the fucking of mothers. Actually, when put like that, it's much better without the fucking of mothers.


You've got to thank the translators for the title - the original Japanese title is something like "The Castle in Spider Web Forest" or "Spider Web castle".


Wed Mar 17, 2010 1:11 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
I'd also rate Throne of Blood close to the tippy-top of the director's output. Haven't read the Criterion essays yet, but I'm sure they mention some of the incredible visuals: the wheel spinning in the forest or the arrow assault. Methinks the actress in the "Lady Macbeth" part was most excellent. That might be down to the bard since, apart from Rashomon, I don't think Kurosawa has particularly strong female characters.


Thu Mar 18, 2010 9:53 am
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
ed_metal_head wrote:
I'd also rate Throne of Blood close to the tippy-top of the director's output. Haven't read the Criterion essays yet, but I'm sure they mention some of the incredible visuals: the wheel spinning in the forest or the arrow assault. Methinks the actress in the "Lady Macbeth" part was most excellent. That might be down to the bard since, apart from Rashomon, I don't think Kurosawa has particularly strong female characters.


I seem to remember you saying you've seen quite a few Kurosawa movies, if not all of them. How would you rank his work? I personally have Throne of Blood and Rashomon at the top, but I've only seen 7 or 8 of his movies.

Good point about the female characters, too. I'd chalk the Lady Macbeth character in Throne of Blood up to ol' Bill Shakespeare. The unemotional performance in ToB is great, but the character is more than fully realized in the play. She's much more evil, going so far as to insult him sexually. Kurosawa paints her in a much more positive light as silly as that may sound. Positive might be a bad word choice, she's just less disgusting. She's a nasty bitch in the play.


Thu Mar 18, 2010 10:36 am
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
High and Low, with a final scene that has stayed with me for the last 36 hours and will probably stay with me a while longer. It falls on the list somewhere in the 200s - I'm having trouble loading the list, unfortunately. Sorry. ~250, if I remember correctly.

Very smart and exciting film; part police procedural, part mystery, part commentary on class struggle. Mifune is great as a man who gambles on his career for what ends up being the kidnapping of the 'wrong' child but the best performance belongs to Tetsuyo Nakadei (a HUGE star at the time) as the ethical, tireless detective at the helm of the case.

It could have been a simple detective story but Kurosawa does more with the material: he visits the lowest end of Japan's society to make the engineer of the kidnapping a whole, well-realized person. There's a great, mostly dialogue-free segment that follows the kidnapper as he scores heroin, flirts, does some dancing in a club - you can't accuse Kurosawa of paper-thin characters. And then there's that final scene that gives the movie its title - without revealing the details I'll just say that it ends the film beautifully with more than a little ambiguity; I got the feeling that we only caught small glimpses of a second movie onto which the first was superimposed. 9/10 or **** out of **** or whatever. I purchased the DVD the next day, at any rate.


Thu Mar 18, 2010 12:57 pm
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Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
majoraphasia wrote:
High and Low, with a final scene that has stayed with me for the last 36 hours and will probably stay with me a while longer. It falls on the list somewhere in the 200s - I'm having trouble loading the list, unfortunately. Sorry. ~250, if I remember correctly.

Very smart and exciting film; part police procedural, part mystery, part commentary on class struggle. Mifune is great as a man who gambles on his career for what ends up being the kidnapping of the 'wrong' child but the best performance belongs to Tetsuyo Nakadei (a HUGE star at the time) as the ethical, tireless detective at the helm of the case.

It could have been a simple detective story but Kurosawa does more with the material: he visits the lowest end of Japan's society to make the engineer of the kidnapping a whole, well-realized person. There's a great, mostly dialogue-free segment that follows the kidnapper as he scores heroin, flirts, does some dancing in a club - you can't accuse Kurosawa of paper-thin characters. And then there's that final scene that gives the movie its title - without revealing the details I'll just say that it ends the film beautifully with more than a little ambiguity; I got the feeling that we only caught small glimpses of a second movie onto which the first was superimposed. 9/10 or **** out of **** or whatever. I purchased the DVD the next day, at any rate.


This is a great film made by a great director. Some of the best scenes come from Junkie Alley where the black and white gives you the creepy, near shocking feeling of seeing the people and the result of using heroin. The last scene is really great to watch and just for me, I couldn't help but feel somewhat sorry for the kidnapper.


Thu Mar 18, 2010 5:02 pm
Profile YIM
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
ed_metal_head wrote:
Zepp, I actually think that Boogie Nights might just be PTA's best film. Do you feel similarly about his other movies?


I've only seen There Will be Blood and Punch-Drunk Love otherwise. Punch-Drunk is my favorite of the three by miles. It's that rare recent American film which is both an excellent romance, technically perfect and a complete original. One of my favorites of the 00s. There Will be Blood was aesthetically awesome, but otherwise I wouldn't touch it with a 10-foot pole. One of the coldest films I've ever seen. And I watched twice. I may not love most of PTA's work, but I've got to give the man credit for being ambitious. Magnolia is high up on my nonexistent To-See list.

On the subject of Throne of Blood, great title aside, I... didn't really like it. And I didn't know why until I read your write-up Petey and the criterion articles you posted. That's when I realized: It was the Noh. Every single problem I had with the film can be traced back to the Noh elements Kurosawa incorporates. It also didn't help that I found it colder than a polar bear and disturbing to boot (speaking of There Will be Blood...). More so than most horror movies. Anyway, for all interested in the film, I recommend reading the first criterion article Peachy posted, just so know what you're getting into. If it helps, it was one of those movies I didn't like but almost immediately wanted to rewatch. A hell of an impressive feat, and one I might actually like now that I know what I'm getting into whenever I do watch it again. This Post: To be continued (probably at a much later date)...


Thu Mar 18, 2010 8:13 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
corpen11 wrote:
majoraphasia wrote:
High and Low, with a final scene that has stayed with me for the last 36 hours and will probably stay with me a while longer. It falls on the list somewhere in the 200s - I'm having trouble loading the list, unfortunately. Sorry. ~250, if I remember correctly.

Very smart and exciting film; part police procedural, part mystery, part commentary on class struggle. Mifune is great as a man who gambles on his career for what ends up being the kidnapping of the 'wrong' child but the best performance belongs to Tetsuyo Nakadei (a HUGE star at the time) as the ethical, tireless detective at the helm of the case.

It could have been a simple detective story but Kurosawa does more with the material: he visits the lowest end of Japan's society to make the engineer of the kidnapping a whole, well-realized person. There's a great, mostly dialogue-free segment that follows the kidnapper as he scores heroin, flirts, does some dancing in a club - you can't accuse Kurosawa of paper-thin characters. And then there's that final scene that gives the movie its title - without revealing the details I'll just say that it ends the film beautifully with more than a little ambiguity; I got the feeling that we only caught small glimpses of a second movie onto which the first was superimposed. 9/10 or **** out of **** or whatever. I purchased the DVD the next day, at any rate.


This is a great film made by a great director. Some of the best scenes come from Junkie Alley where the black and white gives you the creepy, near shocking feeling of seeing the people and the result of using heroin. The last scene is really great to watch and just for me, I couldn't help but feel somewhat sorry for the kidnapper.


Me too. In fact, when the kidnapper finally breaks down I almost lost it. There was something really heartbreaking about that last shot - Mifune's back to the camera, the gate coming down to block his (and our) view of the cell... you know there's something he really wants to say to the condemned man but it's too late.

I gave short shrift to Kurosawa when I believed he was only capable of re-tooling Shakespeare but now realize I definitely missed something. He's no casual director working with well-worn themes; I really need to rewatch those movies of his I dismissed.


Thu Mar 18, 2010 11:07 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
PeachyPete wrote:
I seem to remember you saying you've seen quite a few Kurosawa movies, if not all of them. How would you rank his work? I personally have Throne of Blood and Rashomon at the top, but I've only seen 7 or 8 of his movies.


About 2 years ago I planned to go through the entire imdb top 250. That plan stopped after one movie: Seven Samurai. I was so much in love that I decided to go through Kurosawa's filmography instead. It took me a while since he was pretty prolific (though not as prolific as Woody Allen, now that's a project) and because some of his movies aren't readily available. Still missing quite a few due to access issues. I'd rank them something like this (roughly in order of how much I like them):

10: Seven Samurai - I was less impressed on a recent re-watch at my uni. This might actually drop down to a 9.
9: Ran (very close to a 10), Throne of Blood, High and Low, Ikiru, Dersu Uzala, The Hidden Fortress, Yojimbo, Sanjuro, Kagemusha, Rashomon, The Bad Sleep Well
8: Drunken Angel, The Lower Depths, The Idiot, Stray Dog, Red Beard, Shubun (Scandal)
7: Rhapsody in August, Madadayo, One Wonderful Sunday
6: I Live in Fear, Dodes'ka-den, Dreams

So, as you can see I like the director. It feels all fuzzy to have seen so many. Of course that feeling goes away when folks start talking about Robert Bresson and Douglas Sirk and I realise that I haven't seen a single one of their movies. So it goes.


Fri Mar 19, 2010 11:24 am
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
corpen11 wrote:
majoraphasia wrote:
High and Low, with a final scene that has stayed with me for the last 36 hours and will probably stay with me a while longer. It falls on the list somewhere in the 200s - I'm having trouble loading the list, unfortunately. Sorry. ~250, if I remember correctly.

Very smart and exciting film; part police procedural, part mystery, part commentary on class struggle. Mifune is great as a man who gambles on his career for what ends up being the kidnapping of the 'wrong' child but the best performance belongs to Tetsuyo Nakadei (a HUGE star at the time) as the ethical, tireless detective at the helm of the case.

It could have been a simple detective story but Kurosawa does more with the material: he visits the lowest end of Japan's society to make the engineer of the kidnapping a whole, well-realized person. There's a great, mostly dialogue-free segment that follows the kidnapper as he scores heroin, flirts, does some dancing in a club - you can't accuse Kurosawa of paper-thin characters. And then there's that final scene that gives the movie its title - without revealing the details I'll just say that it ends the film beautifully with more than a little ambiguity; I got the feeling that we only caught small glimpses of a second movie onto which the first was superimposed. 9/10 or **** out of **** or whatever. I purchased the DVD the next day, at any rate.


This is a great film made by a great director. Some of the best scenes come from Junkie Alley where the black and white gives you the creepy, near shocking feeling of seeing the people and the result of using heroin. The last scene is really great to watch and just for me, I couldn't help but feel somewhat sorry for the kidnapper.


Weird. The heroin fuelled scenes are actually what I dislike about the movie. They sort of felt out of place with what had come before. I guess I'm due for a re-watch :)

@Zeppelin:

Film is a strange medium, no? I understand the cold/detached criticism but it's something I didn't even come close to feeling for either film.

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Fri Mar 19, 2010 11:31 am
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
Week End (1967) by Jean-Luc Godard

An experimental, hilariously absurd film with no plot. A couple plan to visit the wife's parents in order to kill her father on the weekend. As they are making their way to the countryside, they have to deal with the violent consequences of fender benders, are passing a traffic jam (in a famous ten minute tracking shot) which includes all kinds of bloody accidents, zoo animals and picnics, lose their car in an accident and wander the countryside as they pass corpeses and burning car wrecks, meet philophising fairytale characters, a travelling piano player, machine gun-wielding cannibal hippies etc., all interrupted by titles which state "class struggle", "this film is lost in the universe" or "this film was found on the trash heap". Characters state "This is a shit movie, why did I ever agree to be in it". Trying to hitch-hike, the husband is asked "Are you real or are you just in a movie?" "Well, we're in a movie, of course" "Then stop lying so much", while the wife is raped off sceen by a polite passer-by. The last title card informs us "End ... of cinema".

I don't think it's possible to make any sense out of this at all, but that's not necessary to enjoy all the absurdity. It's all a bit Monty Python-esque. The contemporary 60ies issues are dated, of couse, but the film is still radical and feels fresh.


Mon Mar 22, 2010 4:39 am
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
#172 on the current edition, Trouble in Paradise, is considered to be director Ernst Lubitsch's greatest film. This according to most websites I've found. I emphasize "most" since the TSPDT list ranks it as his second best film (behind #72 To Be or Not to Be). The film is a romantic comedy that follows a master thief and his petty thief girlfriend as they go to work for a wealthy and attractive woman with the intention of robbing her. The woman takes a liking to the thief though...

I've seen only one other Lubitsch film, Ninotchka, to which there are a few similarities. Both are romantic comedies set in Paris. More importantly, both movies have fine dialogue. I'm guessing good dialogue is a hallmark of the director. This one is also a pre-code film which means there is the odd innuendo. By modern standards it's all incredibly tame, but you will notice that it's a little more risque than something that would come out a few years later.

Since I'm a fan of dialogue driven movies I liked this one a lot. The opening back and forth scenes are particularly inspired. However, the end isn't quite as good. Ultimately, one character utters the following quote:

[Reveal] Spoiler: Avoid if you haven't seen the movie
I came here to rob you, but unfortunately I fell in love with you.

to which I actually cringed. It doesn't derail the movie though, or stop me from recommending it. If you're a fan of Billy Wilder's romantic comedies, then you should make a point of checking this (or Ninotchka) out. My rating is the same as that for Ninotchka, an 8/10, although overall I actually prefered Ninotchka ever so slightly.


Tue Mar 30, 2010 12:30 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
The Lady Vanishes (1938)

This is Alfred Hitchcock's second to last British film before he made the jump to the United States. Supposedly, the financial success of the movie allowed him to negotiate a pretty good deal since his previous three movies were disappointments at the box office.

The plot takes place mostly in a train travelling through a fictional country. Our lead actress has gotten a bump on the head and is a little woozy. She makes friends with an elderly woman before eventually falling asleep. When she awakens, the woman is gone. To make matters worse, all the passengers on the train deny ever having seen the old lady.

I know that Flightplan was partially inspired by this one, but I was honestly surprised by the extent to which it copies the film. A few key scenes are more or less the same.

Unlike Flightplan, The Lady Vanishes is not content to be "just" a thriller. I found the film absolutely hilarious. The comedy here works much better than one of Hitchcock's other comedic attempts in The Trouble With Harry. I'm not sure how well that humour translates across countries though. The most consistent source of jokes involves two British men who are trying desperately to get home in order to catch some Test match cricket. Along the way they're also desperate to at least hear the score. Truth be told, some of the thriller elements don't work. Towards the end, there's also a scene where a group is being held at gun point and we never know what happens. We see some of the people later on and everything seems fine. We're left to assume that they got away, but I would have liked to know *how* they got away. Overall, I liked this more as a comedy than as a thriller. Highly recommended for people who spell humour with two "U"'s. For everyone else, YMMV. 8/10.


Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:48 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
Flightplan stole heavily from a Premminger film called "Bunny Lake Is Missing"; the first 20 minutes of the Jodie Foster film are a virtual reshoot of the concept.


Wed Apr 14, 2010 2:54 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
majoraphasia wrote:
Flightplan stole heavily from a Premminger film called "Bunny Lake Is Missing"; the first 20 minutes of the Jodie Foster film are a virtual reshoot of the concept.


Thanks for that trivia. I guess this means that Flightplan is devoid of even a single original moment?


Thu Apr 15, 2010 2:49 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
ed_metal_head wrote:
majoraphasia wrote:
Flightplan stole heavily from a Premminger film called "Bunny Lake Is Missing"; the first 20 minutes of the Jodie Foster film are a virtual reshoot of the concept.


Thanks for that trivia. I guess this means that Flightplan is devoid of even a single original moment?


Not at all! It was terrible in a brand new way. Have you seen the movie? There's a great and unintentionally sidesplitting scene at the end when a persecuted Middle Eastern character hands Jodie Foster her luggage and forgives her, and by extension America, for all the silly misunderstandings. Again: the persecuted Middle Eastern man apologizes to us. The audience let out a loud, collective groan right on cue.


Thu Apr 15, 2010 11:39 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
ed_metal_head wrote:
The Lady Vanishes (1938)

Overall, I liked this more as a comedy than as a thriller. Highly recommended for people who spell humour with two "U"'s. For everyone else, YMMV. 8/10.

It's been a while since I've seen the movie, but my opinion's pretty in line with this sentence of your review. On your scale, I'd give it a 7/10, but minor differences are minor. It's a damn entertaining film at the end of the day.


Fri Apr 16, 2010 3:41 am
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