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Films ranked 101-1000 
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Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
Pedro wrote:
ed_metal_head wrote:
Wow, thanks to both gentlemen for giving this thread a much needed kick in the ass.

I must admit that I've never seen a picture from Josef von Sternberg so I can't comment too much on what Zep wrote. I'll feebly offer some Kunzian cinematic heresy and ask what the big deal was with Marlene Dietrich? I've seen 2-3 of her late pictures and was rather unimpressed. Perhaps I need to see her at her peak in a 30s/40s film but so far I find that she is a hilarious over-actor.

Rob, I've seen less Godard than you have but I'm working on a theory that his pretentious phase doesn't start until a little later in his career. I saw his Hail Mary (1985) and found it difficult to sit through. Breathless, on the other hand, has no such problems (as you've rightly pointed out).

You should see The Docks of New York because I've been reading about it all semester.


Oh? I'll make a note. This might be a stupid question, but have you seen the movie?

Robert Holloway wrote:
I just had a thought.

The problem with this thread is that it essentially lumps 900 movies into one group.

I do think it's more fun when we have threads running on different movies. it might tempt more people to jump in when they see a title come up in recent posts that they have seen. i just don't think a title called Great films 101-1000 is anything other than daunting or uninteresting for most members.

If it's Ok with our regulars i'll start posting comments as individual movies.

I have no idea why, but three weeks ago I suddenly found the fire again to start watching the great movies. And i'm back into 2-3 a week. That said it's still a huge task ahead.

When I started out I'd seen about 390 of the top 1000 or 39%. I've now reached 541 or 54%

I have a personality trait of being a tracker and a completist. however, there's something more in here. The reality is that the top 1000 movies are simply more fun to watch than most of the crap that comes out each week. The last few months of 2011 releases has been simply awful.

Rob


In theory I'd be inclined to agree but the sad reality is that the Great Movies section isn't much of a success. I was all for it, but there are several members who just don't bother/forget/have the time etc. to check this area of the forum out. The number of topics in the General Forum has declined over the years so I do wonder if it isn't better to start a thread about a Great Movie there. I'm certain that more people will see the thread. The question is whether more of them will comment.


Mon Mar 28, 2011 2:23 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
I saw the 3rd James Stewart/Anthony Mann collaboration The Naked Spur (1953, #700 and something on the list. I'm too lazy to get the correct number).

Stewart plays a man tracking a wanted killer. He captures the man and his female companion with the help of an old man and a dishonourably discharged soldier. However, the captured killer quickly points out that there's a significant reward for his capture. To Stewart's displeasure, the old man and ex-army man insist on accompanying him on the long journey in order to receive part of the reward. Meanwhile, the captured man uses every opportunity to turn the three men against themselves.

I liked this well enough but have to say that I found Winchester '73 to be significantly better. The Naked Spur is less a traditional western and more of a "psychological western" which is what I appreciated most about the film. The way the characters start doubting each of their companions reminded me a little of what made The Treasure of the Sierra Madre really great, except I don't think The Naked Spur does it nearly as well. Still, this is an atypical western and one of the more thought-provoking entries into the genre. I found it good, but not great. 7/10.


Thu May 05, 2011 12:20 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
ed_metal_head wrote:
I saw the 3rd James Stewart/Anthony Mann collaboration The Naked Spur (1953, #700 and something on the list. I'm too lazy to get the correct number).

Stewart plays a man tracking a wanted killer. He captures the man and his female companion with the help of an old man and a dishonourably discharged soldier. However, the captured killer quickly points out that there's a significant reward for his capture. To Stewart's displeasure, the old man and ex-army man insist on accompanying him on the long journey in order to receive part of the reward. Meanwhile, the captured man uses every opportunity to turn the three men against themselves.

I liked this well enough but have to say that I found Winchester '73 to be significantly better. The Naked Spur is less a traditional western and more of a "psychological western" which is what I appreciated most about the film. The way the characters start doubting each of their companions reminded me a little of what made The Treasure of the Sierra Madre really great, except I don't think The Naked Spur does it nearly as well. Still, this is an atypical western and one of the more thought-provoking entries into the genre. I found it good, but not great. 7/10.


I saw this a while ago, and while I liked it, I agree - it's certainly no Winchester '73. I don't have much to add other than agreement. I liked Stewart's performance. In general, I find him more interesting in these types of roles than I do when he's playing the standard Jimmy Stewart persona (which I do still like). Also, I'm a big fan of Robert Ryan. I enjoy him in pretty much everything. Like Lee Marvin, he makes for a great villain.

I like the point you've made comparing the movie the The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. Like you said, it isn't as well done, but it is similar. I hadn't thought of that.


Fri May 06, 2011 9:59 am
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
PeachyPete wrote:
ed_metal_head wrote:
I saw the 3rd James Stewart/Anthony Mann collaboration The Naked Spur (1953, #700 and something on the list. I'm too lazy to get the correct number).

Stewart plays a man tracking a wanted killer. He captures the man and his female companion with the help of an old man and a dishonourably discharged soldier. However, the captured killer quickly points out that there's a significant reward for his capture. To Stewart's displeasure, the old man and ex-army man insist on accompanying him on the long journey in order to receive part of the reward. Meanwhile, the captured man uses every opportunity to turn the three men against themselves.

I liked this well enough but have to say that I found Winchester '73 to be significantly better. The Naked Spur is less a traditional western and more of a "psychological western" which is what I appreciated most about the film. The way the characters start doubting each of their companions reminded me a little of what made The Treasure of the Sierra Madre really great, except I don't think The Naked Spur does it nearly as well. Still, this is an atypical western and one of the more thought-provoking entries into the genre. I found it good, but not great. 7/10.


I saw this a while ago, and while I liked it, I agree - it's certainly no Winchester '73. I don't have much to add other than agreement. I liked Stewart's performance. In general, I find him more interesting in these types of roles than I do when he's playing the standard Jimmy Stewart persona (which I do still like). Also, I'm a big fan of Robert Ryan. I enjoy him in pretty much everything. Like Lee Marvin, he makes for a great villain.

I like the point you've made comparing the movie the The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. Like you said, it isn't as well done, but it is similar. I hadn't thought of that.



Hi there

Just saw Winchester '73 and will be watching Naked Spur over the next few days

Rob


Fri May 06, 2011 10:44 am
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
PeachyPete wrote:
I liked Stewart's performance. In general, I find him more interesting in these types of roles than I do when he's playing the standard Jimmy Stewart persona (which I do still like). Also, I'm a big fan of Robert Ryan. I enjoy him in pretty much everything. Like Lee Marvin, he makes for a great villain.


Yeah, I didn't talk too much about the performances but you're right, especially about Ryan. I was more than a little surprised to see Janet Leigh in this too. Who would have thought?

Robert Holloway wrote:

Hi there

Just saw Winchester '73 and will be watching Naked Spur over the next few days

Rob


I look forward to reading your thoughts Rob and I hope you include something on Winchester too.


Fri May 06, 2011 4:34 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
#195 on "The List" is Ozu's Late Spring (1949). It's ranked much too low.

The plot is exceedingly simple. We have an older widowed man and his adult daughter. He is an academic but is incompetent around the house. The daughter runs the home and the two live in blissful existence. However, despite being in her latter 20s, the daughter is already relatively old for marriage by Japanese standards. Her aunt sets out to get the woman married despite her protests that she's happy living at home with her father.

There's a little more than that, of course, but not much more. The film just proceeds to its logical conclusion. This is a film without death or any type of scandal. This is a film without twists or shocks. This is a film that is very slow, but it is never boring. And yet, despite its simplicity, it's incredibly moving and easily a great picture. Take the final shot: it's an old man peeling an apple. Simple. But, within the context of the picture it is one of the most moving images of cinema I have ever come across.

Late Spring is only my second Ozu picture. Tokyo Story, generally regarded as the best of Ozu's masterpieces, was my first. Late Spring is every bit as good as Tokyo Story. In fact, I think it may even be a little better. 9/10 though I wouldn't rule out giving this a 10 after a few years.


Tue May 31, 2011 2:47 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
Currently at #530 is Nicolas Roeg's The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976). It's not surprising that David Bowie's first film role was playing an alien. Here he has come to Earth (in human form) looking for water because his home planet is going through an extensive drought. He uses his advanced alien technology to patent several new inventions. That quickly leads to him becoming the head of a large corporation. All so that he can build a craft to return. That takes up the bulk of the film's running time and it's a very entertaining yarn to go along with Roeg's sounds and images. Things get a little odd in the last half hour or so but the drop in quality isn't massive (actually, this is when the movie has the most "to say"). Still, I felt that this was a fine film and would easily consider it great. I add that I'm a big sucker for science fiction movies and probably like this a little more than the average film fan would. 8/10.


Tue Aug 23, 2011 10:08 pm
Post Re: Films ranked 101-1000
Some films that are new to the list:

#923 - Au revoir les enfants (Malle)
#914 - On Dangerous Ground (Ray)
#911 - The Incredibles (Bird)
#857 - The Big Red One (Fuller)
#851 - Russian Ark (Sokurov)
#837 - Funny Games (1997, Haneke)
#794 - Sleeper (Allen)
#753 - Harlan County USA (Kopple)
#731 - A Short Film About Killing (Kieslowski)
#721 - Audition (Miike)
#713 - Rififi (Dassin)
#649 - Secrets & Lies (Leigh)
#620 - Swing Time (Stevens)
#503 - Withnail & I (Robinson)

#889 - 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (Mungiu) is the most recently-released addition.

I still like this thread. BUMP.


Sun Jan 15, 2012 2:20 am
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