Discussion of movies and ReelThoughts topics

It is currently Wed Jul 30, 2014 2:29 am




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
84 Pierrot le fou 
Author Message
Cinematographer
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 01, 2009 9:17 pm
Posts: 529
Post Re: 84 Pierrot le fou 1965
I agree mostly with what Rob has already said. But after doing some research, I have been able to appreciate this film a bit more.

You have to think of this film as being part of an art movement, rather than being cinema. It's something that you would see in modern art museums, but it would be in the "What the hell?" section. Basically, modern art after the 1950s. When Godard makes use of the primary colors and breaks the fourth wall between the characters and the audience, he is making more of a visual statement more than anything else. It's one of those things that is hard to like, but easier to appreciate in a grander scheme. A similar literary example would be [i]The Sound and the Fury[i]. I hated the book, but it did break the mold, didn't it?

When I saw this movie, it was late at night. Like 2AM. I think that may have contributed to my opinion of it. It was not difficult for me to get past the ridiculous visual hodgepodge that this movie is, and I really enjoyed some parts of it. The Uncle Sam's nephew and Uncle Ho's niece bit was hilarious. Some of the scenes with the two of them on the beach were beautiful and insightful. And their ultimate demise made an important statement about deception and the uncertainty of love.

Looking back, I don't dislike this movie. I kind of laugh. And anyone who has seen this has to admit, it is one of the more memorable films out there. It does grow on you. I'm going to be a bit more generous and say 7/10.


Tue Jul 28, 2009 4:35 am
Profile
Post Re: 84 Pierrot le fou 1965
darthyoshi wrote:
I agree mostly with what Rob has already said. But after doing some research, I have been able to appreciate this film a bit more.

You have to think of this film as being part of an art movement, rather than being cinema. It's something that you would see in modern art museums, but it would be in the "What the hell?" section. Basically, modern art after the 1950s. When Godard makes use of the primary colors and breaks the fourth wall between the characters and the audience, he is making more of a visual statement more than anything else. It's one of those things that is hard to like, but easier to appreciate in a grander scheme. A similar literary example would be [i]The Sound and the Fury[i]. I hated the book, but it did break the mold, didn't it?

When I saw this movie, it was late at night. Like 2AM. I think that may have contributed to my opinion of it. It was not difficult for me to get past the ridiculous visual hodgepodge that this movie is, and I really enjoyed some parts of it. The Uncle Sam's nephew and Uncle Ho's niece bit was hilarious. Some of the scenes with the two of them on the beach were beautiful and insightful. And their ultimate demise made an important statement about deception and the uncertainty of love.

Looking back, I don't dislike this movie. I kind of laugh. And anyone who has seen this has to admit, it is one of the more memorable films out there. It does grow on you. I'm going to be a bit more generous and say 7/10.


Darthyoshi

Interesting points. We have similar struggles with you appearing to be more open to this "style"

i sometimes wonder if when we watch a film labelled 'classic or 'great if there is not a pressure to find meaning and worth?

All this said, my next Godard is one of my most keenly anticipated movies, even if i do find him "difficult"

Rob


Tue Jul 28, 2009 10:35 am
Post Re: 84 Pierrot le fou 1965
Robert Holloway wrote:
i sometimes wonder if when we watch a film labelled 'classic or 'great if there is not a pressure to find meaning and worth?


I think the only real pressure a supposedly great movie has is if it's really that good. You can find meaning and worth in almost anything if you look hard enough.


Tue Jul 28, 2009 10:46 am
Cinematographer
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 01, 2009 9:17 pm
Posts: 529
Post Re: 84 Pierrot le fou 1965
This is a good question. Are films classic because of tradition, or is it really because they have achieved greatness?

It's a difficult question to answer, largely because greatness is subjective. Remembering back through all of my high school English classes, there were many books that we were required to read, most of them classics. And yet there were few that I really enjoyed. There were more that I extremely disliked, including Jane Eyre, a book which my teacher loved so much that he named his daughter after the author. Going back to films, Raging Bull is considered by many to be the greatest film of the 1980s, and other than the style, I really didn't like it.

Why are we going through the cinematic journey? At the beginning, for me anyways, it was mostly driven out of ambition and my belief in the importance of being acquainted with whatever is designated as "classic". Three months later, 50 movies in, I'm realizing that "classic" and "great" are not synonyms. Many of the films on the list are there because they are firsts or revolutionizers, not because they were "great". Pierrot le Fou is one of them. Honestly, I usually don't enjoy these entries. Maybe it's because they don't stand up to the test of time as well. Like I said, greatness is subjective, but the classic status is not.

I think it's impossible to find personal meaning and worth in all of these films, as we all bring different experiences into what we watch. But I do believe that it is possible to appreciate each of these films as well as understand why they are on this list to begin with.

I hope that made sense. Like I said, I might have just liked Pierrot le Fou because it was late at night.


Tue Jul 28, 2009 8:35 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forum/DivisionCore.
Translated by Xaphos © 2007, 2008, 2009 phpBB.fr