Discussion of movies and ReelThoughts topics

It is currently Sun Sep 21, 2014 4:53 am




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
5 8½ 1963 
Author Message
Post 5 8½ 1963
From Zeppelin on the cinematic journey

Federico Fellini's 8 1/2 is not only the best film I've seen yet on my journey, it's also the first film I've seen since A Clockwork Orange which could be considered a contender for my favorite movie of all time. Sitting at a lofty No. 5 on the top 1000 films of all time, 8 1/2 is Fellini's study of art, responsibility, conformity and himself. Along with that, 8 1/2 is a visual and technical masterpiece, containing some images and scenes which I imagine I won't forgot till the day I die. Film is, in it's essence, a visual medium, and films which us their images to discuss their ideas are the ones which tend to succeed the most, and 8 1/2 exceels in that regard, rooting it's characters in fantastic yet relatable experiences and dreams sequences. I said in my recount of Blue Velvet that each of the films I've seen on my journey have been at least interesting in a technical regard, but 8 1/2 is more than that. It uses it's technical wizardry to draw the viewer into the emotionally exhausted, cerebral world of Guido, inspiring both the mind and the heart in a journey into self-ignorance and eventual discovery of intense power.

I haven't even touched on Marcello Mastroianni amazing acting or gone into depth into the ideas present in 8 1/2, but honestly I don't want to. Even a week later I'm speechless, and humbled. 8 1/2 is still swimming around in my head. A true masterpiece. 10/10


Tue Jul 21, 2009 1:15 am
Cinematographer
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 01, 2009 9:17 pm
Posts: 529
Post Re: 5 8½ 1963
Alright, I'm going to pull this thread up from the bottom of the forum. We need something other than the Scorsese threads.

8 1/2 was one of the first films that I saw on the cinematic journey, and it was also my first Fellini film. I knew nothing about it when I saw it. I did not know who Fellini was. On the DVD, there was an introduction by Terry Gilliam, director of 12 Monkeys, one of my favorite movies. So right there, I was hopeful. He made it sound like it had influenced him on a very personal level and that it had a lot to say about film making in general.

Hmm...

Well, if I were you, and you want to get into Fellini, don't watch this one first. This is where he starts to get weird. There are scenes that are imaginary, memories, and dreams, and there is little to no transition between these scenes and reality. Everything is tied together by the vanity that seems to permeate throughout Fellini's works. Every time I see something that he has made, I always wonder "why?". Never to the point that I did with L'avventura, but the feeling is still there.

I think this movie was personal for Fellini, just as Persona was personal for Bergman. 8 1/2 is about a famous Italian director who feels claustrophobic and stretched because of what people expect from him. Everyone expects another new hit movie, everyone has questions, and he has none of the answers. It's amazing how far along the production of the movie will go before anyone notices this. I don't think the main character answers one question throughout the course of the movie.

I love Marcello Mastroianni. Whenever I see an Italian movie, I expect him to be in it. I am always disappointed when he isn't. He is just so good, all the time. He is the best part of Fellini's work in general.

I think that it is hard for anyone outside of film making to truly love this film. It was made for directors about directing. I suppose that it is possible to take what Fellini is saying in 8 1/2 and apply it to leadership in general, but half of what makes it work here is the intensity and vanity of the studio system.

I will say that this film grows on you. When I first saw it, my reaction was no more than "WTF?" But now, I have a desire to revisit it. This one will take time.


Wed Aug 12, 2009 8:17 pm
Profile
Post Re: 5 8½ 1963
I agree. DON"T START HERE!

I've been thinking about starting a thread here for a hitchhikers guide to great movies

i cannot remember the amount of times I've read or been asked - where should I start?

There are some movies that are "difficult" and others that are easier to get into

I was thinking along the lines of twenty excellent introductions from the top 100
Twenty intermediate films that will make you think
Twenty that might blow your mind

What do you think?

Rob


Thu Aug 13, 2009 12:34 am
Cinematographer
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 01, 2009 9:17 pm
Posts: 529
Post Re: 5 8½ 1963
Robert Holloway wrote:
I agree. DON"T START HERE!

I've been thinking about starting a thread here for a hitchhikers guide to great movies

i cannot remember the amount of times I've read or been asked - where should I start?

There are some movies that are "difficult" and others that are easier to get into

I was thinking along the lines of twenty excellent introductions from the top 100
Twenty intermediate films that will make you think
Twenty that might blow your mind

What do you think?

Rob


Sort of like a movie playlist, eh? Sounds like fun. I'm already having ideas.


Thu Aug 13, 2009 1:05 am
Profile
Post Re: 5 8½ 1963
I'm starting to wonder if Fellini ever made a movie that I could love. Everything I've seen has been frustrating, second-tier Bergmanian stuff. Yikes. I know I'm not particularly well versed in Fellini's work (I haven't seen the BIG films he's directed outside of 8 1/2) but I'll be putting off his titles on the list until the very end of the 100. Poor 8 1/2. I was maybe 14 when I saw it and it bored me to pieces. I should try again. Eventually. A while from now.


Thu Aug 13, 2009 5:13 am
Director

Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 7:44 pm
Posts: 1478
Post Re: 5 8½ 1963
any interest in 'Nine?'

the review in the Reporter wasn't good:

Quote:
Any number of movies have served as the basis for stage musicals -- even "Gone With the Wind" was bravely attempted, though with predictable results. But it's fairly unusual and probably not a good idea to bring such musicals back into their original medium. One of the rare instances when it did work was Federico Fellini's "Nights of Cabiria," which turned into a Broadway tuner, "Sweet Charity" (by Neil Simon, Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields), and then became a pretty terrific Bob Fosse musical film. So, understandably, the Weinstein Co. and a host of producers thought lightning might strike twice with Fellini's "8 1/2," which inspired the Tony Award-winning 1982 musical "Nine." Lightning does not strike the same place twice.

The disappointments are many here, from a starry cast the film ill uses to flat musical numbers that never fully integrate into the dramatic story. The only easy prediction is that "Nine" is not going to revive the slumbering musical film genre. Boxoffice looks problematic too, but moviegoers are going to be enticed by that cast, and the Weinstein brothers certainly know how to promote a movie. So modest returns are the most optimistic possibility.

Fellini's 1963 masterpiece takes you inside a man's head. Since he happens to be a movie director, those daydreams and recollections are visually striking but, more to the point, you sense, through the nightmares of an artist blocked from his own creativity, everything that is going on inside this man. In "Nine," written by Michael Tolkin and the late Anthony Minghella, you get a tired filmmaker with too many women in his life and not enough movie ideas.


Fri Dec 04, 2009 6:39 pm
Profile
Post Re: 5 8½ 1963
calvero wrote:
any interest in 'Nine?'

the review in the Reporter wasn't good:

Quote:
Any number of movies have served as the basis for stage musicals -- even "Gone With the Wind" was bravely attempted, though with predictable results. But it's fairly unusual and probably not a good idea to bring such musicals back into their original medium. One of the rare instances when it did work was Federico Fellini's "Nights of Cabiria," which turned into a Broadway tuner, "Sweet Charity" (by Neil Simon, Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields), and then became a pretty terrific Bob Fosse musical film. So, understandably, the Weinstein Co. and a host of producers thought lightning might strike twice with Fellini's "8 1/2," which inspired the Tony Award-winning 1982 musical "Nine." Lightning does not strike the same place twice.

The disappointments are many here, from a starry cast the film ill uses to flat musical numbers that never fully integrate into the dramatic story. The only easy prediction is that "Nine" is not going to revive the slumbering musical film genre. Boxoffice looks problematic too, but moviegoers are going to be enticed by that cast, and the Weinstein brothers certainly know how to promote a movie. So modest returns are the most optimistic possibility.

Fellini's 1963 masterpiece takes you inside a man's head. Since he happens to be a movie director, those daydreams and recollections are visually striking but, more to the point, you sense, through the nightmares of an artist blocked from his own creativity, everything that is going on inside this man. In "Nine," written by Michael Tolkin and the late Anthony Minghella, you get a tired filmmaker with too many women in his life and not enough movie ideas.


This question will probably be better answered when some people have actually seen "Nine", but is "8 1/2" required viewing before jumping into this pic?


Sat Dec 05, 2009 1:49 pm
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forum/DivisionCore.
Translated by Xaphos © 2007, 2008, 2009 phpBB.fr