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The Best Films of 2010 
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Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
JJoshay wrote:
Out of interest, why the championing of the generally disregarded by this forum Jackass sequel?
The short answer: the Jackass crew found a way to make getting hit in the nuts funny again.

The long answer is that it's tremendously entertaining, and I think there's more to it than meets the eye. Somewhere in this smorgasbord of feces, wild animals, and airborne flour, there is a very charming, unguarded sense of male camaraderie. The film is not put together with regard to plot, but has a musical sense of cadence and development. Each piece is a movement that hooks into next, dramatically rather than literally. The various gags, especially this time around, are infused with a bent creativity that borders on performance art. There is something absurdly serene about watching a large, wobbling dildo fly in slow motion through miniature models of famous cities. It's Kubrick's moon shuttle, gliding soundlessly and weightlessly. What a way to comment on familiar images while simultaneously providing new ones.

Don't get me wrong. I don't mean to attempt to validate this film. It doesn't need my validation. The biggest impression it made on me was with its grossness, its audacity, its infectious pain, and its hilarity. And, damn it, it's so funny. Some people will laugh at the sight of grown men having food slapped out of their hands by a giant spring-loaded papier mache hand. Those people have no business calling this a bad movie. I am one of those people.


Thu Dec 23, 2010 12:49 am
Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
Interesting take on J3D that I partially agree with, although my two and a half rating is based more on the fact that in the second third of the film the real laughs were a little far between.

Here's the first of probably numerous repostings of my list, I changed what I said from before and added another film.

#3 – The Human Centipede (First Sequence) (Six): While certainly one of the strangest works to be released in 2010, The Human Centipede is also one of the ballsiest and most effective films of its kind since The Texas Chainsaw Massacre came out back in 1974. Centipede builds a sense of dread and terror that it maintains until long after the end credits have rolled, grounding the body horror subgenre in a truly fucked up twist on reality by creating and displaying horrific and fantastical images that run off of our fears of bodily harm unlike any film before it. The Human Centipede runs on a minimalist directorial aesthetic while upholding its cinematic vision all the way until its cynical, nihilistic finale; many have declared the film impossible to rate and maybe that’s so, but it is still one of the most unrelenting pictures to come out in years.
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#2 – The Ghost Writer (Polanski): Roman Polanski crafts a masterpiece out of his latest film, The Ghost Writer, a thriller in the same vein as Michael Clayton but more personal. Polanski finished editing the film under house arrest for a nearly four decade old crime, he automatically resembles the films Brosnan character, a political outcast himself eerily reminiscent of British ex-Prime Minister Tony Blair; the filmmaker and the character both remain in turns reviled and respected. The films political intrigue plot, deftly presented by cinematographer Pawel Edelman, masterfully weaves itself inside and out without once tying itself into a not or getting stuck in a rut, moving at a deliberate pace while retaining interest for the entire two-hour running length. Suavely directed with total elegance by Polanski, smoothly scripted by Polanski and Robert Harris and acted with easy agility by players by Ewan McGregor, Pierce Brosnan and in particular Olivia Williams, The Ghost Writer remains one of the smartest films released in 2010.
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#1 – Inception and The Social Network (Nolan/Fincher): The two best films of 2010 were great for different reasons, as such I see no reason why I can’t tie them so they both share their rightful place at number one. For Inception, I don’t think I could put into words more elegantly my thought process during the film then the A.V. Club, “The next time you watch Inception, take a moment during the bravura extended climax to wonder at the mechanics at work. The way writer-director Christopher Nolan keeps the action moving on so many planes and at so many different paces at once is exciting in itself. But don’t linger too long. Inception works in part because it seldom calls attention to those mechanics, sweeping viewers along into its dream world—and worlds of dreams within dreams—while offering a thrilling, emotionally affecting film about desire, disappointment, and delusion, all packaged in a movie that’s also about the art of moviemaking. Think of that final shot as a mystery never to be solved in a film that never truly ends.” Part of the joy behind Inception is seeing the director’s vision being presented so brilliantly and flawlessly onto the screen, when Joseph Gordon-Levitt is running around the spinning hallway and you realize that everything the film has taught you before it is pulling together seamlessly into the whole. It’s a wonderful experience to watch in an ingenious take on the heist genre, and the film is one of the best examples of pure filmmaking this year. With The Social Network you have the year’s most sharply written character study displaying the rise of genius but antisocial billionaire Mark Zuckerberg, the creator of the massive social site Facebook. Aaron Sorkin and David Fincher prove a masterful combo, giving depth and dimension to the film’s numerous characters while keeping the rat-a-tat dialogue snapping back and forth between its key players, uniformally excellent as played by Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield, Justin Timberlake and others. The film is about the (mis)communication of the digital information age. As Jim Emerson and others have put it before, its characters are constantly talking in code. While the code is what built Zuckerberg’s site, it’s what also tore apart his personal life, losing his girlfriend and his best friend and alienating others. Zuckerberg is an enigma, with virtually no social skills (and even less of a filter), and he finds solace in his work when he finds it no place else. He is constantly searching for hidden meanings in whatever is being said, for disapproval and rejection, the two things he fears the most yet doesn’t know how to turn away, and in Facebook tries to dispel by finding acceptance in a digital world of his creation; the final shot capturing Mark simply recycling the page on his computer, waiting to see if his ex will accept his friend request. In one of the most prescient lines from a film in recent memory, Timberlake’s Sean Parker says, “We lived in farms, then we lived in cities, and now we’re gonna live on the internet.” It’s not accuracy to the facts that Fincher and Sorkin are aiming for or interested in with The Social Network, but what we find in the Zuckerberg character who, like Tyler Durden before him, embodies our current culture unlike any character or any film before this.
ImageImage


Thu Dec 23, 2010 12:59 am
Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
Ken wrote:
JJoshay wrote:
Out of interest, why the championing of the generally disregarded by this forum Jackass sequel?
The short answer: the Jackass crew found a way to make getting hit in the nuts funny again.

The long answer is that it's tremendously entertaining, and I think there's more to it than meets the eye. Somewhere in this smorgasbord of feces, wild animals, and airborne flour, there is a very charming, unguarded sense of male camaraderie. The film is not put together with regard to plot, but has a musical sense of cadence and development. Each piece is a movement that hooks into next, dramatically rather than literally. The various gags, especially this time around, are infused with a bent creativity that borders on performance art. There is something absurdly serene about watching a large, wobbling dildo fly in slow motion through miniature models of famous cities. It's Kubrick's moon shuttle, gliding soundlessly and weightlessly. What a way to comment on familiar images while simultaneously providing new ones.

Don't get me wrong. I don't mean to attempt to validate this film. It doesn't need my validation. The biggest impression it made on me was with its grossness, its audacity, its infectious pain, and its hilarity. And, damn it, it's so funny. Some people will laugh at the sight of grown men having food slapped out of their hands by a giant spring-loaded papier mache hand. Those people have no business calling this a bad movie. I am one of those people.
Oh boy, statements like this are so damn depressing to hear, the mere existence of rotten garbage like Jackass 3-D iss proof enough that there is no God, this review pretty much echoes my thoughtshttp://themovieboy.com/reviews/j/10_jackass3.htm


Thu Dec 23, 2010 2:27 am
Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
Vexer wrote:
the mere existence of rotten garbage like Jackass 3-D iss proof enough that there is no God
As an atheist, perhaps I am specially equipped to enjoy this movie.


Thu Dec 23, 2010 3:51 am
Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
Ken wrote:
Vexer wrote:
the mere existence of rotten garbage like Jackass 3-D iss proof enough that there is no God
As an atheist, perhaps I am specially equipped to enjoy this movie.

I'm an atheist too, it still dosen't make those films any more tolerable.


Thu Dec 23, 2010 4:09 am
Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
If Jackass 3D proves that there is no god, at least you can feel validated in your non-belief. I know I do.

Though if anybody has a divine vision, it's going to be in the "tee ball" scene.


Thu Dec 23, 2010 4:23 am
Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
10. Animal Kingdom
9. Black Swan
8. Dogtooth
7. Shutter Island
6. The Town
5. Green Zone
4. The King's Speech
3. The Social Network
2. Inception
1. Rabbit Hole


Thu Dec 23, 2010 12:34 pm
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Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
My breakdown thus far:

1st Tier (***1/2 out of ****):

#1. True Grit
#2. Inception
#3. The Social Network
#4. Toy Story 3
#5. 127 Hours
#6. Shutter Island

2nd Tier (*** out of ****):

#1. Black Swan
#2. Cyrus
#3. The Ghost Writer
#4. The Town
#5. Paranormal Activity 2
#6. Unstoppable
#7. The Crazies

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Tue Dec 28, 2010 2:21 am
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Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
Zeppelin wrote:
Pedro wrote:
Oh how early it is to do this list. XD


True that. I'm usually not happy with my numbers until the middle of January if not later. Hell, with 2009 I'm not sure I ever saw half the movies I wanted to. I guess my not having an indie theater near me doesn't help this at all.

Anyway, I'm trying to do things differently this year and actually watch some interesting movies to put on my year-end list. Right now, the essential "missed" films include (Domestic release dates be damned!):

blah blah blah Enter the Void blah blah blah



Hey! So I hate to clutter up this thread with another "Here's what I want to see" thread, but Netflix is now saying that Enter the Void will be coming to streaming on the 25th of January, so everyone with that one on their lists and an account should wait till then. Also, place my list sometime in the ballpark of then, cause that's arguably the film from this year I'm most eager to see, and I'd feel wrong making one before seeing it.


Last edited by Zeppelin on Thu Dec 30, 2010 2:22 am, edited 1 time in total.



Thu Dec 30, 2010 1:53 am
Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
I have a question:

What drives your choices to place a film in the top 10?

Enjoyment?
Ambition?
Quality?
Buzz?

or something dark and more perverse :-)

Rob


Thu Dec 30, 2010 2:19 am
Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
Robert Holloway wrote:
I have a question:

What drives your choices to place a film in the top 10?

Enjoyment?
Ambition?
Quality?
Buzz?

or something dark and more perverse :-)

Rob


It's always enjoyment or, more accurately, the strength of the visceral (probably initial) response and just how excited I get about a movie and its ideas/execution/miscellaneous. If I have to rationalize a movie into excellence (which we've all done) then I don't put it on any meaningless list.

Lists. Mine is fairly arbitrary. The best movie of the year, to me, was defintely Dogtooth but Fish Tank was probably just as wonderful. Not quite as memorable.

I didn't spend a ton of time putting my top ten together because stakes are pretty low. Easy A might have been one of the top ten of the year but, at the time I typed the first post up, it didn't seem like it was. I also implied Black Swan was going to make the revised list but I've changed my mind -- I saw at least 10 movies I liked more.

I always feel pretentious/disingenous when I put up a list and keep promising myself that I'm not going to do it any more.


Thu Dec 30, 2010 2:39 am
Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
Robert Holloway wrote:
I have a question:

What drives your choices to place a film in the top 10?

Enjoyment?
Ambition?
Quality?
Buzz?

or something dark and more perverse :-)

Rob
I tend to simplify the myriad concerns with just one: effect.

Whether it be intellectual, emotional, or aesthetic (which tends to be a combination of the two), the movie has to have that sense of pizzazz--that draw that changes my state of mind and pulls me back again. I couldn't intellectualize it much more than that, because the analysis of the effect differs so drastically from movie to movie. But all the great movies, to me, have to have Effect.


Thu Dec 30, 2010 2:49 am
Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
Robert Holloway wrote:
I have a question:

What drives your choices to place a film in the top 10?

Enjoyment?
Ambition?
Quality?
Buzz?

or something dark and more perverse :-)

Rob

Bias, often. I've written more about Inception's flaws than its strengths, and yet it's my number three (or four, depending on how you look at it). I love what Nolan tends to cook up and I'm always able to sit through his bullshit and find something to admire.

There's more to it than that, obviously, but I really want to highlight bias.


Thu Dec 30, 2010 3:05 am
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Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
Couldn't bring myself to do a top 10 list just yet. I still have yet to seeBlue Valentine, Night Catches Us or the new Mike Leigh one. Linked below is a list of sorts that I made.

http://open.salon.com/blog/jeff_wilder/2010/12/30/the_year_in_film_2010

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Fri Dec 31, 2010 1:41 am
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Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
Zeppelin wrote:
Pedro wrote:
Oh how early it is to do this list. XD


True that. I'm usually not happy with my numbers until the middle of January if not later. Hell, with 2009 I'm not sure I ever saw half the movies I wanted to. I guess my not having an indie theater near me doesn't help this at all.


+1

I caught A Christmas Tale a few weeks back and that film would probably make its way onto my 2008 list. I'll do a 2010 anyway but consider this the alpha draft.

10. The Ghost Writer - A fairly standard political thriller elevated by Roman Polanski's deft direction and Pierce Brosnan's unjustly overlooked performance.

9. Easy A - We already know Emma Stone can act. Now we know that she can carry a film. And carry it really well too!

8. Four Lions - The best comedy about suicide bombers that you will see this year. What?

7. The Kids Are All Right - conventional family problems tale becomes unconventional when lesbians head the family.

6. How to Train Your Dragon - the first Dreamworks animated film that can compete with Pixar. Sweet film, nice morals.

5. Animal Kingdom - it's like Goodfellas, just more about family and less stylish. Actually, it's not like Goodfellas.

4. Toy Story 3 - no need to qualify by saying "animated". Pixar just makes fine films. Toy Story 3 is no different, but how long can it last?

3. Winter's Bone - "Ozark" wasn't in my dictionary before seeing this. Fine film made even better by two searing performances (John Hawkes in particular)

2. Scott Pilgrim vs. the World - continually compared to Kick-Ass. Both are stylish comic book adaptations but the comparisons end there. Scott Pilgrim is one of the deepest movies of the year. Kick-Ass is not.

1. Inception - my favourite movie of the year by some distance. Chris Nolan continues to create arthouse blockbusters that are more thoughtful than virtually all summer movies combined. Can you think of any blockbuster with as much symbolism as this? I can't.

* Two 2009 movies that weren't released until 2010 would have made my list if I was mixing years. Dogtooth is the funniest, craziest and most original film I've seen all year. Overprotect children at your own risk. Valhalla Rising is the heir to Herzog's Aguirre. A beautiful film about madness (and much, much more). The aforementioned films would represent my #2 and #3 of the year respectively but I've chosen not to include them in the list proper.


Fri Dec 31, 2010 2:38 pm
Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
Well, folks, this is it: the last day of 2010.

Time for last-minute screenings and the ponying-up of various lists.

Mine will be posted shortly.

How exciting!

[/Rob Holloway typing mode]


Fri Dec 31, 2010 3:10 pm
Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
Here is my list, plus commentary.

EDIT:

Man, I can't believe I left that biffed link up all night.


Last edited by Ken on Sat Jan 01, 2011 2:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Fri Dec 31, 2010 4:44 pm
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Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
I generally don't make Top 10s, unless I've found ten films that I can really latch on to. Keeping in mind that I live in a pretty rural area, I don't always get to see some of the best stuff that gets released. So this is a list of the films that struck me in one way or another as great art, great entertainment, or both. I do have a favorite of the year, and after I single that out I'll list the rest in alphabetical order.

#1 The Social Network

Few films in 2010 truly aspired to greatness, but The Social Network reached higher than any other title during the year. With this film, David Fincher has not only crafted a crackling, whip-smart story, but has also tapped into our national (or is it worldwide?) inability to truly communicate with each other, despite being more connected than ever. The Social Network is a profound and relevant film for today's times, which makes it my #1 of the year.

The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo/The Girl Who Played With Fire

The first two chapters of Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy are tremendous genre pieces, filled with memorable setpieces, riveting storylines, and interesting characters...but none steal the screen like Noomi Rapace's Lisbeth Salander. She owns Salander, and I don't see Rooney Mara or anyone else matching what Rapace did here. While the third installment, The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest, is pretty disposable, the first two film in the trilogy are fantastic, with Dragon Tattoo being enriched by a subsequent viewing of Fire.

Green Zone

While Green Zone may not be a revelation to anyone who's paid attention to the news in the last decade, this film about the American search for WMDs in Iraq features tremendous drama and action. Matt Damon is superb, and the action scenes are never overbearing; they serve to advance the plot and not just fill time. Green Zone is one of the best thrillers I saw this year.

Inception

Christopher Nolan made a pretty nifty reinvention of the heist movie with this, possibly the best of all the summer films. Pleny of people have written plenty of words about Inception, so I'll just add this: I've read some comments where people have said that it's a hard film to follow. It isn't, if you pay attention to it. Chris Nolan made a smart film that doesn't allow the audience to check its brain at the door. Thank God for that.

The Kids Are All Right

I've said on many occasions that I have a soft spot for character dramas like these. And others have said that if the couple wasn't gay, there wouldn't be anything special about this movie. They're probably right. But I did like the performances from all the actors, and as I've gotten older I can identify more with some of the things the characters feel. The Kids Are All Right is a small winner in my book.

Machete

Now this is how you make an exploitation movie. Director Robert Rodriguez and kick-ass action star Danny Trejo exploit the issue of illegal immigration just as an excuse to show heads and limbs getting chopped off. Me, I wouldn't have it any other way. Robert De Niro is a hoot and a holler in a hilarious role as a corrupt state senator.

Unstoppable

One of the most entertaining films of the year, Unstoppable takes a cliche of a situation, several stock characters, and creates a ridiculously exciting thrill ride out of it. This film had no business being as good as it was, but it was.

Stuff I didn't get to see but wanted to:

The Ghost Writer
The American
The Town

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Fri Dec 31, 2010 11:52 pm
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Post Re: The Best Films of 2010
I do want to make a list but I'm curious how some of you came up with your picks. For example Rob picked 'Terribly Happy' which is a film I also loved but it's from 2008 according to imdb. Are you going by the release date in the US or? The same goes with A Prophet which is from 2009.


Fri Dec 31, 2010 11:59 pm
Post Re: The Best Films of 2010


Some decent picks (are they ranked in order of preference?) and it's tough to argue with your explanations. I never see why people need to name specific movies they must see before they're comfortable with their list (I'm certainly not condemning the practice though). It's really a trivial exercise because months later you're bound to come across excellent movies you had not heard of previously. This is true for all films, but is especially the case with foreign films that get tiny releases and don't establish an audience until they're out on home video.

Sexual Chocolate wrote:

The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo/The Girl Who Played With Fire

The first two chapters of Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy are tremendous genre pieces, filled with memorable setpieces, riveting storylines, and interesting characters...but none steal the screen like Noomi Rapace's Lisbeth Salander. She owns Salander, and I don't see Rooney Mara or anyone else matching what Rapace did here. While the third installment, The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest, is pretty disposable, the first two film in the trilogy are fantastic, with Dragon Tattoo being enriched by a subsequent viewing of Fire.


I've been pretty harsh on the trilogy, but I actually like the first film. Apart from quite a few ludicrous developments (NAZIS!?) it's a good watch. However, I'm not so sure about the sequels. Either of them...

floatingworld wrote:
I do want to make a list but I'm curious how some of you came up with your picks. For example Rob picked 'Terribly Happy' which is a film I also loved but it's from 2008 according to imdb. Are you going by the release date in the US or? The same goes with A Prophet which is from 2009.


"Arbitrarily" is how I think most people came up with their picks. Some people chose 2010 films only. Some people included pictures that were released in the US in 2010. Pedro even made lists for both. I say do whatever floats your boat. Or world. :)


Tue Jan 04, 2011 1:20 pm
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