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The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll 
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Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
DylnFan96818 wrote:
1. Citizen Kane
2. 2001 - A Space Odyssey
3. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
4. Dark City
5. The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.


This is a good list, but I think it could use some more pretentious French films.

Robert Holloway wrote:
I could have put many from my 37 great movies in this list.

Zeppelin - I have Jeanne Dielman almost a top my queue at Netflix. Your choices are awesome, no cream from me!


Just out of curiosity Rob, do you have your all-time greats list laying around somewhere close? I know you've posted it before, but I'd love to see how things have changed in the Holloway home since your hiatus. If not, don't worry about it. I'll make do.

On Jeanne Dielman: You're in for treat with that one, albeit a very slow, very unconventional one. Be sure to post something once you've watched it. I'd love to know what you thought of it.

Quote:
I lived for two years at 1080 Bruxelles as well!


You seem to have had quite the interesting life, eh Rob? Ever considered an autobiography? Something tells me it'd be a fun read.

JJoshay wrote:
So we have a few films that are leading the polls, but instead of posting those I decided to post the five lowest voted films for this update.

Casablanca (1942, Michael Curtiz)
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966, Sergio Leone)
Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975, Chantel Akerman)
Tokyo Story (1953, Yasujiro Ozu)
Wild Strawberries (1957, Ingmar Bergman)

At least one of these films being so low on the poll is a surprise to me, I'm also surprised by a few of the films that thus far have been left off of peoples lists. Still no end date for the poll, it won't be too far off. When the poll is done I'll post the results and I'll also post my top five (which will have no bearing on the poll). I ask again for you all to post you're reasons for your votes; I pretty happy with the results so far.


Somehow I'm not surprised Jeanne Dielman is that low. I'd move it up, but that would be dishonest. Oh well. I'm going to go out on a limb and say Citizen Kane is leading by a country mile? And why is your vote not counting? I know you don't want to seem biased, but I think we all trust you around here.

And since you asked so nicely:

Me! wrote:
5. Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles
4. Ordet
3. Apocalypse Now
2. 8 1/2
1. Andrei Rublev


Jeanne Dielman - I'll try to keep these short and avoid spoilers. Several of these films I picked because, not only are they masterpieces, but they also changed the way I thought about or perceived film. Jeanne Dielman managed that, a good year after I thought I had the medium figured out. It has one of the most interesting directorial and editorial schemes ever laid out in a film; the entire film takes place in one house, but there are no shots establishing where the parts of house lay in regards to the others, and on top of that only straight-on medium shots are used throughout the entire 200 minute film. It's disorientating, and, here's that word, hypnotic. It's also, possibly, the greatest character study ever made, because it's largely internal, studying the titular character in regards to her environment, her barely changing facial expressions, and her mind-numbing routines only. As major said, it's possibly the most exciting movie about absolutely nothing happening ever made, and also the one to finally make me realize just how important spacial relations were in making and studying films.

Ordet - You know, now I kind of wish I'd given this spot to Persona or Spirit of the Beehive instead. Favors change constantly though, don't they, so I'll leave this as it is. I mean, Ordet is still a masterpiece. Arguably the 2nd greatest film about spirituality (No prizes for guessing the first), it's an austere masterpiece from director of The Passion of Joan of Arc about a rural family's largely spiritual conflicts. Unlike Passion, Ordet's direction is much subtler and lets the characters breath quite a bit more (When I first started watching it I even thought it a little stagey), but it's just as brilliant. But what makes Ordet great is that the characters and the plot stand on their own, and their conflicts and doubts are universal and fascinating. And let's not forget the ending, which... Well, if you haven't seen it, let's just say it's unexpected. It raises the stakes to a whole 'nother level, and is genuinally unforgettable so much so that the recent film Silent Light completely ripped it off. How's that for influence?

Apocalypse Now - I'm sure you know the Truffaut quote: anti-war films can't exist because war is too darn exciting when viewed. Well, well several other films could prove that quote wrong (Paths of Glory, anyone?), none do it quite like Apocalypse Now. Instead of rendering the war as a horror of humanism and down-to-earth evil, Apocalypse Now instead renders it as a lucid fever nightmare, the worst drug trip one could ever possibly take. AN takes war in the exact opposite direction of most anti-war films, and by blowing it up to such ridiculous extremes and making it as palatable as possible (the cinematography, arguably the best ever, is so stylized it can blow minds) he created one of the best pure mood pieces ever, a piece of visceral carnage that holds you and refuses to let go into you're shaken to your very core. Problems with the ending be damned; this is as good as pure cinema gets.

8 1/2 - These last two are a bit tougher than the others, because they came on the eve of my indoctrination into hypnotic foreign cinema and I was so over whelmed by both that I can barely remember why. This might make it hasty to thus put them at the top of an all-time greats list, but the effect they had on me cannot be denied (Note: I'll be watching them both again soon anyway; bought 8 1/2 during the Criterion sale and will do the same with Andrei soon. It's rumored that Criterion is preparing a new transfer, so that's what held me back). Still, I'll do my best. 8 1/2 is, generic opinion here, I know, possibly the best movie ever made about the artistic process, and also cemented my resolve to at least try my luck in the film business, success be damned. Fellini created here a masterpiece of character study, of non-literal autobiography and of decadence. In stark contrast to his earlier films, he created a film about a character fighting not the world, but himself, his history and his mind. He's a fickle slave to all these things, yet his realization of it just drives him further down the rabbit hole. On top of that, it's a fantastic examination of the connection between art, life and death, and the way it ties all these threads together in the end haunts me to this day. My favorite film from my favorite filmmaker.

Andrei Rublev - Ah, Andrei. If 8 1/2 is difficult to come to terms with, than this one might be impossible. It was a film that, after watching I sat around for a bit, surfed the internet a little, thinking about it more and more, while the entire time slowly being filled with feelings of such warmth, grandeur and awe that I could hardly move. Reelviewers, I had a moment of goddamn religious transcendence. Because of a movie. And for several months after, I couldn't have told you why. I could only remember the thoughts the feelings, the challenges it gave me. However, after writing an essay about it for a college, I started to come to terms with it. Here's what I found out. Andrei Rublev is the greatest film ever made, because it is the most urgent, stunning and beautiful film ever made one of the urgent topics that art tries to conquer: spirituality. No film, document, or person has ever made a better argument, to me, about the need for faith in the human experience. And not necessarily in a God either, but in humanity, in the unknown, in history. God is often little more than an abstraction, but human kindness, human success, and even blind human luck are not abstractions, and it is faith in these things that can shock, and overwhelm one with happiness and awe. It might be because I found myself in a position similar to Andrei's, in doubting in not just a greater power or a greater purpose but any purpose at all, at the time I watched the film, but Andrei Rublev still, in a way that had nothing to do with the medium of film changed my life. And that is why I consider it the greatest motion picture ever made.


Sat Aug 07, 2010 12:27 am
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Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
Quote:
This is a good list, but I think it could use some more pretentious French films.


No, no, that's O.K. I'll leave that up to others here who enjoy that kind of nonsense.


Sat Aug 07, 2010 2:24 am
Profile
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
So I'll be killing this thread and posting the results on Friday or Saturday. To everyone who hasn't voted, please do :)


Mon Aug 09, 2010 3:35 pm
Director

Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 7:44 pm
Posts: 1446
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
surprised JamesKunz hasn't posted here


Mon Aug 09, 2010 4:01 pm
Profile
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
calvero wrote:
surprised JamesKunz hasn't posted here


I've wondered that myself, but to each his own. Maybe he has a problem naming "greatest" films, I don't know.


Mon Aug 09, 2010 4:12 pm
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
Zeppelin wrote:
DylnFan96818 wrote:

Robert Holloway wrote:
I could have put many from my 37 great movies in this list.

Zeppelin - I have Jeanne Dielman almost a top my queue at Netflix. Your choices are awesome, no cream from me!


Just out of curiosity Rob, do you have your all-time greats list laying around somewhere close? I know you've posted it before, but I'd love to see how things have changed in the Holloway home since your hiatus. If not, don't worry about it. I'll make do.

On Jeanne Dielman: You're in for treat with that one, albeit a very slow, very unconventional one. Be sure to post something once you've watched it. I'd love to know what you thought of it.

Quote:
I lived for two years at 1080 Bruxelles as well!


You seem to have had quite the interesting life, eh Rob? Ever considered an autobiography? Something tells me it'd be a fun read.



Of over 10,000 different movies seen (and many seen many times) these are the only films that have ever received a straight 10.

Battleship Potemkin 1925
Passion Of Joan Of Arc, The 1928
Thirty Nine Steps, The 1935
Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs 1937
Grande Illusion, The 1937
Citizen Kane 1941
Maltese Falcon, The 1941
Double Indemnity 1942
Casablanca 1943
It's A Wonderful Life 1946
Letter From An Unknown Woman 1948
Asphalt Jungle, The 1950
Sunset Boulevard 1950
Tokyo Story 1953
Twelve Angry Men 1956
Vertigo 1957
Witness For The Prosecution 1957
North By Northwest 1959
Psycho 1960
Hustler, The 1961
Lawrence Of Arabia 1963
Doctor Strangelove... 1964
Two 2001 : A Space Odyssey 1968
French Connection, The 1971
Badlands 1973
Chinatown 1974
Taxi Driver 1976
Apocalypse Now 1979
Amadeus 1984
Field Of Dreams 1989
Goodfellas 1990
Unforgiven 1992
In The Name Of The Father 1993
Shawshank Redemption, The 1994
Saving Private Ryan 1998
Into The Wild 2007
Wall - E 2008

Nothing new for 2 years :-(

But 251 have received a 9 :-)

Rob


Mon Aug 09, 2010 9:58 pm
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
And the polls are closed! Finished! Done! Its time for the results!!

09 - Seven Samurai (Kurosawa, 1954)
Image

09 - Pulp Fiction (Tarantino, 1994)
Image

08 - Psycho (Hitchcock, 1960)
Image

06 - Taxi Driver (Scorsese, 1976)
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06 - The Decalogue (Kieslowski, 1988)
Image

05 - The Godfather (Coppola, 1972)
Image

04 - The Searchers (Ford, 1956)
Image

03 - Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958)
Image

02 - 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)
Image

01 - Citizen Kane (Welles, 1940)
Image

Both Citizen Kane and 2001: A Space Odyssey led the poll; Kane with six votes equating to 28 points and 2001 with seven votes equating to 26 points. Vertigo had a big push by Holloway (who wrote a wonderful small essay on the film) and numerous others. The Searchers slunk its way to towards the top, ending at number four. Francis Ford Coppola may have had one then one film voted for but it was The Godfather, Part 1 that made the list at number five.

I was genuinely surprised by the lack of support for Casablanca, receiving just one vote and one point. Other films neglected to one point included Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles, Ratatouille, Tokyo Story (:cry:) and Wild Strawberries.

These type of lists are interesting in how, as indicated by Major when he did something similar for animated films, for example, The Godfather received three votes and ended up with nine points while The Searchers only received two votes but ended up with ten points.

Personally, my top five would be...

01 – Casablanca (Curtiz, 1942)
Image

02 – It’s a Wonderful Life (Capra, 1946)
Image

03 – The Wages of Fear (Clouzot, 1952)
Image

04 – The Godfather (Coppola, 1972)
Image

05 – Nashville (Altman, 1975)
Image

These are the films that have affected me the most, upon evaluation I have found them next to flawless (if not) and I couldn't imagine my film going experience being complete without them (among many others). If it wasn't for the purposes of this forum, I would quite possibly tie The Godfather and Apocalypse Now, but I've insisted on only five films so AN is moved to number six. In a perfect world this list would also include Pinocchio and possibly Raiders of the Lost Ark, but it is as it stands.


Last edited by JJoshay on Tue Aug 17, 2010 12:32 am, edited 3 times in total.



Mon Aug 16, 2010 7:00 pm
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
Now, to end it all, a forum goers ode of love to his favorite film.

Robert Holloway wrote:
Obsessing

Alfred Hitchcock has been a favorite director since I was a child and it is always a thrill to return to one of his movies. I’ve seen just about everything he made and own most of them on DVD. The enigma amidst Hitchcock’s filmography has always been “Vertigo”. Released in late May 1958 (the week before I was born) it sits at No. 2 on the list of the greatest films ever made.

As a child in the UK I was an admirer of Hitchcock from an early age. “North By Northwest”, “Dial M For Murder”, “Strangers on a Train” were all films that I quickly gravitated towards as the BBC endlessly ran Hitchcock seasons showing films on Friday and Saturday nights for weeks on end.

“Vertigo” was the great disappointment. It seemed to be the black sheep. It was odd, different, atypical and not what I either expected or was used to. However, after multiple viewings it started to grow on me and slowly, my appreciation of the film grew. The highlight was in 2007 when my girlfriend walked me to our local cinema in Berkeley. I sat in the beautiful theater with no idea what we going to see. The Bernard Herrmann score started and curtains pulled back and I was in for what would become one of the great cinematic moments of my life. “Vertigo” had snapped into focus and planted its hooks very firmly into my mind. After that I re watched the DVD and realized what a great film it truly is. I was excited to see it again.

Paramount was acquiring books and screenplays for Hitchcock’s next picture. One of them was by a pair of French authors. It was called D’Entre Les Morts (From Among the Dead). They were paid $25k. Vera Miles was due to star with James Stewart, but she became pregnant and was replaced by Kim Novak.

James Stewart plays a police detective gripped by vertigo. He retires from the force after a colleague falls to his death trying to rescue him after a chase across the roof-tops of San Francisco. He is approached by a friend and asked to follow his wife. The friend is convinced that his wife, Madeleine, is suicidal and acting in a very strange way. Stewart reluctantly agrees and starts to trail the woman. He slowly becomes infatuated and then obsessed with her and her strange past. I won’t share more of the plot for fear of spoiling the experience of the first time viewer. Let’s just say that “Vertigo” contains some of the greatest twists and reveals in all of cinema as Stewart’s detective is drawn ever deeper into the story of Madeleine and her past. Even watching it for the umpteenth time, I still find that I am shocked at that decisive moment.

I watched “Vertigo” twice for my journey. The film followed by the commentary with the producer and the restorers. Oh how I wish Hitchcock could have recorded his thoughts. I then reread the appropriate section in the Truffaut book on Hitchcock and then revisited the amazing book on “Vertigo” by Dan Auiler along with the forward by Scorsese.

Scorsese writes that “Vertigo” stands alone as a Hitchcock and Hollywood film. His point is that it is an unusually personal film from within the studio system. He notes how the film is driven by obsession. The author of the book poses a question that I have asked myself over the past three years. “Why does Vertigo affect us so deeply?” Critic Robin Wood states that “Vertigo” is Hitchcock’s Macbeth, the flawed gem. “Rear Window may be the more perfect creation but Vertigo” is the superior movie.

So why is “Vertigo” so powerful? Hitchcock begins with a close up on a rung of a ladder on a building. The following scenes are classic and conventional Hitchcock. It’s seems to be one of his conventional thrillers. All this quickly changes as the film becomes a dark and twisted tale rather than the light soufflés that had been made over the previous five years. James Stewart was perfectly cast and quite brilliant as Scottie. Who knew George Bailey could go to such places as he obsessed over this woman? His face conveys lust, confusion, power and torment. This is acting of the very highest order and one for anyone who under rates Stewart.

Many people believe that “Psycho” is Hitchcock’s darkest movie is “Psycho”. I would argue that “Vertigo” is even darker. “Psycho” is a movie about terror. “Vertigo” gets in to the dark spaces of necrophilia, the role of the female and abuse. If you look closely at James Stewart’s face there are dark thoughts going through his mind. This was not by chance. Upon first viewing these darker themes are not immediately apparent. The scene in the clothes store is one to watch and re watch. I’ll be deliberately vague here for fear of spoiling.

I have read and watched enough of Hitchcock’s movies to be convinced that “Vertigo” is also about a director obsessing over a leading lady. Much has been noted about Hitch’s deep feelings towards Grace Kelly. She was now married to the Prince of Monaco and unavailable to Hitch. His search for blondes to replace and replicate Grace Kelly has an eerie parallel.

“Vertigo” is not a perfect movie. Some find Kim Novak to be a little wooden. I would differ and suggest that she captures the troubled heroine remarkably well. The plot can appear contrived and this was certainly something I struggled with upon first viewing. Detailed dissection of the plot is meaningless in a film like this because it’s not about absolutes. The central characters are deceiving themselves and us from all directions. Most obviously, how did Stewart survive the opening scene?

The technical contribution is again immense. There are so many great camera setups. Look out for the descending body in the opening scene and the way the people rush out beneath. Echoes of “North by Northwest” at the UN. The interior tracking zoom shot in the bell tower. The use of back-drops throughout. One shot is the most memorable. A lady emerges from a hotel room lit by neon green. I’ll say no more on that one. Bernard Herrmann’s score is legendary. The dream sequence and the lovely opening titles from Saul Bass. The use of the Bay Area locations....

As the film stopped for the second time in two days I sat there and realized something that I did not believe was possible. This film that had so disappointed me all those years ago, now had its hooks so deep into me. I looked at the books that I had bought, the DVD’s, the soundtrack and realized that I had just watched my favorite film of all time. Of course “Citizen Kane” is more important, is technically more brilliant and a greater piece of showmanship. But “Vertigo” has a story and themes combined with a style that for me trump the brilliance of Orson Welles. I know that an objective shoot out between these two movies is ridiculous. All anyone can do is look at how a film affects them and how they feel afterwards. After “Vertigo” I was drained.

The whole purpose of this trip had been to discover new movies, directors and ideas. To revisit old friends and see how I felt about them after the recent deep immersion in great cinema. The ascension of this film to my personal cinematic summit was complete and my “Vertigo” had been confirmed.


Mon Aug 16, 2010 7:24 pm
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
JJoshay wrote:
And the polls are closed! Finished! Done! Its time for the results!!

10 - Seven Samurai (Kurosawa, 1954)
Image

10 - Pulp Fiction (Tarantino, 1994)
Image

09 - Psycho (Hitchcock, 1960)
Image

07 - Taxi Driver (Scorsese, 1976)
Image

07 - The Decalogue (Kieslowski, 1988)
Image

06 - The Godfather (Coppola, 1972)
Image

04 - The Searchers (Ford, 1956)
Image

04 - Andrei Rublev (Tarkovsky, 1966)
Image

03 - Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958)
Image

02 - 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)
Image

01 - Citizen Kane (Welles, 1940)
Image

Both Citizen Kane and 2001: A Space Odyssey led the poll; Kane with six votes equating to 28 points and 2001 with seven votes equating to 26 points. Vertigo had a big push by Holloway (who wrote a wonderful small essay on the film) and numerous others. Andrei Rublev slunk its way in towards the top of the list, setting itself at a tie with John Ford's iconic 1956 western The Searchers. Francis Ford Coppola may have had one then one film voted for but it was The Godfather, Part 1 that made the list at number six.

I was genuinely surprised by the lack of support for Casablanca, receiving just one vote and one point. Other films neglected to one point included Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles, Ratatouille, Tokyo Story (:cry:) and Wild Strawberries.

These type of lists are interesting in how, as indicated by Major when he did something similar for animated films, for example, The Godfather received three votes and ended up with nine points while The Searchers and Andrei Rublev both only received two votes but ended up with ten points.

Personally, my top five would be...

01 – Casablanca (Curtiz, 1942)
Image

02 – It’s a Wonderful Life (Capra, 1946)
Image

03 – The Wages of Fear (Clouzot, 1952)
Image

04 – The Godfather (Coppola, 1972)
Image

05 – Nashville (Altman, 1975)
Image

These are the films that have affected me the most, upon evaluation I have found them next to flawless (if not) and I couldn't imagine my film going experience being complete without them (among many others). If it wasn't for the purposes of this forum, I would quite possibly tie The Godfather and Apocalypse Now, but I've insisted on only five films so AN is moved to number six. In a perfect world this list would also include Pinocchio and possibly Raiders of the Lost Ark, but it is as it stands.



Great job and thanks for doing this. It was very interesting to see other people's all time top movies.

One can argue about the places on the list, but it's hard to dispute the merit of these movies.

Rob


Mon Aug 16, 2010 10:27 pm
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
Robert Holloway wrote:
Great job and thanks for doing this. It was very interesting to see other people's all time top movies.

One can argue about the places on the list, but it's hard to dispute the merit of these movies.


Thats why I wanted to do it, for example, I had no idea Andrei Rublev was so high regarded among the forum members, I still have yet to see it. I absolutely loved your reading on Vertigo, the more I think of the film the higher regard I place it in. This is the type of stuff I wanted from this, I'm happy with the results. Also, if I had allowed my vote to count then Casablanca would have tied with Seven Samurai and Pulp Fiction at number ten >.<


Mon Aug 16, 2010 10:42 pm
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
It tickles me pretty to see Andrei that high on that list, but I'm afraid there may have been a mistake. I scanned over this thread a couple times and each time it looked like only I voted for it. Are you sure you didn't count me twice? I love seeing that film that high on any best-of list, but not unfairly.

Still a good list, even if most of them wouldn't be nearly that high on my own. Still interesting though. Thanks for the effort Josh.


Last edited by Zeppelin on Tue Aug 17, 2010 12:54 am, edited 1 time in total.



Tue Aug 17, 2010 12:06 am
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
Robert Holloway wrote:
JJoshay wrote:
And the polls are closed! Finished! Done! Its time for the results!!

09 - Seven Samurai (Kurosawa, 1954)
Image

09 - Pulp Fiction (Tarantino, 1994)
Image

08 - Psycho (Hitchcock, 1960)
Image

06 - Taxi Driver (Scorsese, 1976)
Image

06 - The Decalogue (Kieslowski, 1988)
Image

05 - The Godfather (Coppola, 1972)
Image

04 - The Searchers (Ford, 1956)
Image

03 - Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958)
Image

02 - 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)
Image

01 - Citizen Kane (Welles, 1940)
Image

Both Citizen Kane and 2001: A Space Odyssey led the poll; Kane with six votes equating to 28 points and 2001 with seven votes equating to 26 points. Vertigo had a big push by Holloway (who wrote a wonderful small essay on the film) and numerous others. The Searchers slunk its way to towards the top, ending at number four. Francis Ford Coppola may have had one then one film voted for but it was The Godfather, Part 1 that made the list at number five.

I was genuinely surprised by the lack of support for Casablanca, receiving just one vote and one point. Other films neglected to one point included Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles, Ratatouille, Tokyo Story (:cry:) and Wild Strawberries.

These type of lists are interesting in how, as indicated by Major when he did something similar for animated films, for example, The Godfather received three votes and ended up with nine points while The Searchers only received two votes but ended up with ten points.

Personally, my top five would be...

01 – Casablanca (Curtiz, 1942)
Image

02 – It’s a Wonderful Life (Capra, 1946)
Image

03 – The Wages of Fear (Clouzot, 1952)
Image

04 – The Godfather (Coppola, 1972)
Image

05 – Nashville (Altman, 1975)
Image

These are the films that have affected me the most, upon evaluation I have found them next to flawless (if not) and I couldn't imagine my film going experience being complete without them (among many others). If it wasn't for the purposes of this forum, I would quite possibly tie The Godfather and Apocalypse Now, but I've insisted on only five films so AN is moved to number six. In a perfect world this list would also include Pinocchio and possibly Raiders of the Lost Ark, but it is as it stands.



Great job and thanks for doing this. It was very interesting to see other people's all time top movies.

One can argue about the places on the list, but it's hard to dispute the merit of these movies.

Rob


Tue Aug 17, 2010 12:27 am
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
Zeppelin wrote:
It tickles me pretty to see Andrei that high on that list, but I'm afraid there may have been a mistake. I scanned over this thread a couple times and each time it looked like only I voted for it. Are you sure you didn't count me twice? I love seeing the film that high on any best-of list, but not unfairly.

Still a good list, even if most of them wouldn't be nearly that high on my own list. Still interesting though. Thanks for the effort Josh.


Damn you Zeppelin, the mistake has been changed >.< I'm still planning on seeing Andrei Rublev quite soon.


Tue Aug 17, 2010 12:32 am
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
I know that this may open the flood gates.

I like and admire The Searchers but have never understood the level of admiration from others. I'm at 8/10 so I really do like it.

Maybe it's a US thing and Westerns - maybe it's John Wayne. I just don't get it.

Can someone explain how it's the 4th best film ever?

Cheers
Rob


Tue Aug 17, 2010 2:09 am
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
Robert Holloway wrote:
I know that this may open the flood gates.

I like and admire The Searchers but have never understood the level of admiration from others.

Can someone explain how it's the 4th best film ever?

Cheers
Rob


Majority vote?

I thought it was an excellent film but I wouldn't put it so high myself. Some amazing camera work for sure, true fact.


Tue Aug 17, 2010 2:18 am
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
Robert Holloway wrote:
Of over 10,000 different movies seen (and many seen many times) these are the only films that have ever received a straight 10.

Battleship Potemkin 1925
Passion Of Joan Of Arc, The 1928
Thirty Nine Steps, The 1935
Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs 1937
Grande Illusion, The 1937
Citizen Kane 1941
Maltese Falcon, The 1941
Double Indemnity 1942
Casablanca 1943
It's A Wonderful Life 1946
Letter From An Unknown Woman 1948
Asphalt Jungle, The 1950
Sunset Boulevard 1950
Tokyo Story 1953
Twelve Angry Men 1956
Vertigo 1957
Witness For The Prosecution 1957
North By Northwest 1959
Psycho 1960
Hustler, The 1961
Lawrence Of Arabia 1963
Doctor Strangelove... 1964
Two 2001 : A Space Odyssey 1968
French Connection, The 1971
Badlands 1973
Chinatown 1974
Taxi Driver 1976
Apocalypse Now 1979
Amadeus 1984
Field Of Dreams 1989
Goodfellas 1990
Unforgiven 1992
In The Name Of The Father 1993
Shawshank Redemption, The 1994
Saving Private Ryan 1998
Into The Wild 2007
Wall - E 2008

Nothing new for 2 years :-(

But 251 have received a 9 :-)

Rob


So there are three films I'm wondering about Robert: Pinocchio, Alien and Aliens. Wheres the love man? :(


Wed Sep 01, 2010 4:42 am
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
JJoshay wrote:
Robert Holloway wrote:
Of over 10,000 different movies seen (and many seen many times) these are the only films that have ever received a straight 10.

Nothing new for 2 years :-(

But 251 have received a 9 :-)

Rob


So there are three films I'm wondering about Robert: Pinocchio, Alien and Aliens. Wheres the love man? :(



I love both Alien and Aliens and gave them both 9. My preference is for the original.
I have not seen Pinocchio for many years (I assume you mean Disney) I gave it an 8.

My fave animated films are Wall-E and Snow White with eleven 9's.

Rob


Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:28 am
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
Robert Holloway wrote:
JJoshay wrote:
So there are three films I'm wondering about Robert: Pinocchio, Alien and Aliens. Wheres the love man? :(



I love both Alien and Aliens and gave them both 9. My preference is for the original.
I have not seen Pinocchio for many years (I assume you mean Disney) I gave it an 8.

My fave animated films are Wall-E and Snow White with eleven 9's.

Rob


If there is ever a film I implore you to rewatch as soon as possible Rob, it's the 1940 Disney Pinocchio.

Also, what do you mean by eleven 9's?


Wed Sep 01, 2010 2:24 pm
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
Fine work, Jjoshay. I'm thrilled to see that my only pick (Taxi Driver) made the list. I imagine it affects me in much the same way that Vertigo affects Rob, though I do understand that it's not as easy to like as some of the other items on the list. Good to see that the Reelviewers appreciate what I believe to be a genuine masterpiece.


Wed Sep 01, 2010 6:55 pm
Post Re: The Reelviews Greatest Film Poll
JJoshay wrote:
Robert Holloway wrote:
JJoshay wrote:
So there are three films I'm wondering about Robert: Pinocchio, Alien and Aliens. Wheres the love man? :(



I love both Alien and Aliens and gave them both 9. My preference is for the original.
I have not seen Pinocchio for many years (I assume you mean Disney) I gave it an 8.

My fave animated films are Wall-E and Snow White with eleven 9's.

Rob


If there is ever a film I implore you to rewatch as soon as possible Rob, it's the 1940 Disney Pinocchio.

Also, what do you mean by eleven 9's?


I'll rewatch it, just don't know when
Eleven 9's means 11 films rated 9 for animation

Rob


Wed Sep 01, 2010 7:55 pm
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