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Best "Making Of" Books 
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Post Best "Making Of" Books
What are the best "Making Of...Art Of..." film books that you've come across?

Right now I am reading Ray Harryhausen: An Animated Life
While not really a strict "Making Of..." book I'm finding it very interesting.

I'd love to hear what others you can recommend.


Sun Feb 15, 2009 10:12 pm
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
My dad owns the Full Metal Jacket Diary book, and it seems to have some good stuff in there-- it also comes with an authentic film reel from the movie, which I thought was pretty awesome.


Sun Feb 15, 2009 10:14 pm
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
Sidney Lumet's Making Movies is great. I also really like Moviemakers' Master Class: Private Lessons From the World's Foremost Directors by Laurent Tirard. It has some great interviews with Woody Allen, the Coen Brothers, David Lynch, Jean Luc-Godard, Martin Scorsese, Wim Wenders, and many other famous directors.


Sun Feb 15, 2009 10:16 pm
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
Rob wrote:
Sidney Lumet's Making Movies is great. I also really like Moviemakers' Master Class: Private Lessons From the World's Foremost Directors by Laurent Tirard. It has some great interviews with Woody Allen, the Coen Brothers, David Lynch, Jean Luc-Godard, Martin Scorsese, Wim Wenders, and many other famous directors.


The Sidney Lumet book interests me. He is one of my favorite directors, and I have never seen or heard of this book, so I think I am going to have to check it out now.


Sun Feb 15, 2009 10:18 pm
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
Glass-Onion wrote:
What are the best "Making Of...Art Of..." film books that you've come across?

Right now I am reading Ray Harryhausen: An Animated Life
While not really a strict "Making Of..." book I'm finding it very interesting.

I'd love to hear what others you can recommend.


Again, not strictly a making of book, but as close as you'll get. The best book on cinema I have ever read is by Francois Truffaut. It's a 400 page interview with Alfred Hitchcock on his motivations, methodology and life. It stretches from his childgood through every movie through to Torn Curtain.

I have read it several times and often reread the relevant chapter after watching a Hitchcock movie.

It's simply called "Hitchcock"

Rob


Sun Feb 15, 2009 10:19 pm
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
Robert Holloway wrote:
Glass-Onion wrote:
What are the best "Making Of...Art Of..." film books that you've come across?

Right now I am reading Ray Harryhausen: An Animated Life
While not really a strict "Making Of..." book I'm finding it very interesting.

I'd love to hear what others you can recommend.


Again, not strictly a making of book, but as close as you'll get. The best book on cinema I have ever read is by Francois Truffaut. It's a 400 page interview with Alfred Hitchcock on his motivations, methodology and life. It stretches from his childgood through every movie through to Torn Curtain.

I have read it several times and often reread the relevant chapter after watching a Hitchcock movie.

It's simply called "Hitchcock"

Rob


I haven't seen too many Hitchcock flicks, but do you think that I should watch most of them, and then read the book, or should I read the book and then watch them?


Sun Feb 15, 2009 10:20 pm
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
Robert Holloway wrote:
Glass-Onion wrote:
What are the best "Making Of...Art Of..." film books that you've come across?

Right now I am reading Ray Harryhausen: An Animated Life
While not really a strict "Making Of..." book I'm finding it very interesting.

I'd love to hear what others you can recommend.


Again, not strictly a making of book, but as close as you'll get. The best book on cinema I have ever read is by Francois Truffaut. It's a 400 page interview with Alfred Hitchcock on his motivations, methodology and life. It stretches from his childgood through every movie through to Torn Curtain.

I have read it several times and often reread the relevant chapter after watching a Hitchcock movie.

It's simply called "Hitchcock"

Rob


Wow that sounds like an excellent book. I really haven't read a lot about Hitchcock or his films so that sounds like the ultimate treasure trove. I will have to check that one out.
Thank you very much for the suggestion.


Sun Feb 15, 2009 10:28 pm
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
Pixar releases some terrific ones, especially since they show how characters looked early on as well as early story concepts. It's fun to see the early designs of the future civilizations in Wall-E (originally they would be gelatinous blobs rather than big-boned humans).


Sun Feb 15, 2009 10:38 pm
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
estefan wrote:
Pixar releases some terrific ones, especially since they show how characters looked early on as well as early story concepts. It's fun to see the early designs of the future civilizations in Wall-E (originally they would be gelatinous blobs rather than big-boned humans).


I can't remember the name of it, but I used to have a Spirited Away book, that showed the original artwork, and it included the full script. It was pretty awesome.


Sun Feb 15, 2009 10:39 pm
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
etifupleez wrote:
Robert Holloway wrote:
Glass-Onion wrote:
What are the best "Making Of...Art Of..." film books that you've come across?

Right now I am reading Ray Harryhausen: An Animated Life
While not really a strict "Making Of..." book I'm finding it very interesting.

I'd love to hear what others you can recommend.


Again, not strictly a making of book, but as close as you'll get. The best book on cinema I have ever read is by Francois Truffaut. It's a 400 page interview with Alfred Hitchcock on his motivations, methodology and life. It stretches from his childgood through every movie through to Torn Curtain.

I have read it several times and often reread the relevant chapter after watching a Hitchcock movie.

It's simply called "Hitchcock"

Rob


I haven't seen too many Hitchcock flicks, but do you think that I should watch most of them, and then read the book, or should I read the book and then watch them?


Hi there

I've been asked by friends many times where to start with Hitchcock? He directed over 50 films so it's a long haul to see them all, trust me! I think that james is planning to go into a Hitchcock reviewing frenzy once he's done with the eighties.

i don't know your taste in film. The easiest way in is through North by Northwest, Dial M For Murder, To Catch A Thief, Rear Window and Strangers on a Train. Don't start with his early black and whites and definitely avoid Vertigo as your first experience.

Once you've decided that you want to go deeper there are many more to sample. These should definitely encompass Psycho, Vertigo his earlier works like 39 Steps and Lady Vanishes. His greats from the forties like Rebecca and Notorious.

The great thing about Alfred Hitchcock is that there are so many classics and even most of his lesser films are treasures in their own way. people have their own favorites, but i've rarely met anyone who did not like those first few.

I mentioned Vertigo. It's my personal favorite, but it's not the easiest to like upon first viewing. I was actually disappointed. Now I have Vertigo books, been to the locations, seen the rerelease at the theater, the CD...... sad really.

I hope all this helps

You have hours of fun ahead of you. let us know how you get on!
Rob


Sun Feb 15, 2009 10:45 pm
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
Glass-Onion wrote:
Robert Holloway wrote:
Glass-Onion wrote:
What are the best "Making Of...Art Of..." film books that you've come across?

Right now I am reading Ray Harryhausen: An Animated Life
While not really a strict "Making Of..." book I'm finding it very interesting.

I'd love to hear what others you can recommend.


Again, not strictly a making of book, but as close as you'll get. The best book on cinema I have ever read is by Francois Truffaut. It's a 400 page interview with Alfred Hitchcock on his motivations, methodology and life. It stretches from his childgood through every movie through to Torn Curtain.

I have read it several times and often reread the relevant chapter after watching a Hitchcock movie.

It's simply called "Hitchcock"

Rob


Wow that sounds like an excellent book. I really haven't read a lot about Hitchcock or his films so that sounds like the ultimate treasure trove. I will have to check that one out.
Thank you very much for the suggestion.


Hi Glass onion

Enjoy!

http://www.amazon.com/Hitchcock-Revised ... 400&sr=1-1

Rob


Sun Feb 15, 2009 10:48 pm
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
Again, not strictly a making of book, but as close as you'll get. The best book on cinema I have ever read is by Francois Truffaut. It's a 400 page interview with Alfred Hitchcock on his motivations, methodology and life. It stretches from his childgood through every movie through to Torn Curtain.

I have read it several times and often reread the relevant chapter after watching a Hitchcock movie.

It's simply called "Hitchcock"

Rob[/quote]

I haven't seen too many Hitchcock flicks, but do you think that I should watch most of them, and then read the book, or should I read the book and then watch them?[/quote]

Hi there

I've been asked by friends many times where to start with Hitchcock? He directed over 50 films so it's a long haul to see them all, trust me! I think that james is planning to go into a Hitchcock reviewing frenzy once he's done with the eighties.

i don't know your taste in film. The easiest way in is through North by Northwest, Dial M For Murder, To Catch A Thief, Rear Window and Strangers on a Train. Don't start with his early black and whites and definitely avoid Vertigo as your first experience.

Once you've decided that you want to go deeper there are many more to sample. These should definitely encompass Psycho, Vertigo his earlier works like 39 Steps and Lady Vanishes. His greats from the forties like Rebecca and Notorious.

The great thing about Alfred Hitchcock is that there are so many classics and even most of his lesser films are treasures in their own way. people have their own favorites, but i've rarely met anyone who did not like those first few.

I mentioned Vertigo. It's my personal favorite, but it's not the easiest to like upon first viewing. I was actually disappointed. Now I have Vertigo books, been to the locations, seen the rerelease at the theater, the CD...... sad really.

I hope all this helps

You have hours of fun ahead of you. let us know how you get on!
Rob[/quote]

I guess I am heading in the right direction! The only Hitchcock film I have seen is Strangers On A Train, so I guess I should continue watching...


Sun Feb 15, 2009 10:56 pm
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
Have to go with "Rebel Without A Crew", Robert Rodriguez's book about the making of El Mariachi. Just brilliant.


Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:15 pm
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
etifupleez wrote:
Again, not strictly a making of book, but as close as you'll get. The best book on cinema I have ever read is by Francois Truffaut. It's a 400 page interview with Alfred Hitchcock on his motivations, methodology and life. It stretches from his childgood through every movie through to Torn Curtain.

I have read it several times and often reread the relevant chapter after watching a Hitchcock movie.

It's simply called "Hitchcock"

Rob


I haven't seen too many Hitchcock flicks, but do you think that I should watch most of them, and then read the book, or should I read the book and then watch them?[/quote]

Hi there

I've been asked by friends many times where to start with Hitchcock? He directed over 50 films so it's a long haul to see them all, trust me! I think that james is planning to go into a Hitchcock reviewing frenzy once he's done with the eighties.

i don't know your taste in film. The easiest way in is through North by Northwest, Dial M For Murder, To Catch A Thief, Rear Window and Strangers on a Train. Don't start with his early black and whites and definitely avoid Vertigo as your first experience.

Once you've decided that you want to go deeper there are many more to sample. These should definitely encompass Psycho, Vertigo his earlier works like 39 Steps and Lady Vanishes. His greats from the forties like Rebecca and Notorious.

The great thing about Alfred Hitchcock is that there are so many classics and even most of his lesser films are treasures in their own way. people have their own favorites, but i've rarely met anyone who did not like those first few.

I mentioned Vertigo. It's my personal favorite, but it's not the easiest to like upon first viewing. I was actually disappointed. Now I have Vertigo books, been to the locations, seen the rerelease at the theater, the CD...... sad really.

I hope all this helps

You have hours of fun ahead of you. let us know how you get on!
Rob[/quote]

I guess I am heading in the right direction! The only Hitchcock film I have seen is Strangers On A Train, so I guess I should continue watching...[/quote]


Next up for you....

North By NorthWest
You'll love it. Trust me on this :-)

Rob


Mon Feb 16, 2009 2:26 am
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
The Firm - I really liked how Sydney Pollack changed the ending b/c the film's version was alot more realistic than the book's. Grisham wasn't happy, from what I read.

The Pelican Brief - The plot and almost all of its details(with the exception of a couple of minor ones) were followed word for word, and it paid off.


Mon Feb 16, 2009 3:48 am
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
SamuraiThief wrote:
Have to go with "Rebel Without A Crew", Robert Rodriguez's book about the making of El Mariachi. Just brilliant.


I'll second that. Rebel Without A Crew is an entertaining book.

Another good one is The Jaws Log by Carl Gottlieb.


Tue Feb 17, 2009 10:45 am
Post Re: Best "Making Of" Books
I'm currently reading Spielberg Truffaut & Me by Bob Balaban.
It's some kind of a diary he wrote during the making of Close Encounters of the Third Kind. It has some nice insights into how chaotic and often boring film making can actually be. It's also filled with lots of nice anecdotes.
He also seems to be interested in some of the special effects and thus asks some people about them and tries to reproduce the explanation. Just yesterday I read a nice distinction between back and front projection.


Wed Feb 18, 2009 4:04 am
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