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GRAVITY 
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Post Re: GRAVITY
Most people who say Superman's boring for those reasons aren't terribly familiar with Superman, and also put little thought into why they think those reasons apply to him but not most other superheroes as well--including everybody's favorite human superhero.

And the main reason for the "Marvel revolution" (which actually started at DC Comics in the mid-'50s) was the Red Scare killing off most other comic book genres and leaving superheroes as the only one to emerge unscathed. Comics were once the fertile province of horror, crime, and sci-fi stories, but you'd never know it now.

And don't think for a second that Swingin' Stan Lee and his invention of the Regular Guy Superhero (again, it happened at DC in the '50s--Barry Allen, anyone?) was anything other than an opportunist taking advantage of a good situation, and not to mention a bunch of talented young artists who were not nearly as publicity-savvy as he was. His gift is the gift of gab. Consequently, he finds his way into a number of accomplishments that he truthfully didn't have a lot to do with.

That's not to downplay his hard work, because his output in the 1960s can't be denied... when it's actually him writing the stories.

If I had to guess why some people have a hard time relating to Superman, it's the same reason why people like to tear down any hero. There's something in our psychology that feels more comfortable confirming our own base nature, rather than taking the awful responsibility of recognizing our equally great potential to live up to our ideas. When hard-pressed, those people will probably admit that they don't particularly identify with a mega-rich guy with issues or a 30-year-old genius superhero who still can't remember to leave rent money for his frail old auntie, but those characters are often characterized as vengeful and self-loathing. And those things are an unfortunately common source of literary comfort food.

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Sat Oct 12, 2013 7:54 pm
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Post Re: GRAVITY
Brillian post about marvel and Stan lee.

And I agree that superman is relatable. He's no different from any other adopted child with talent. Especially talent that wouldn't have been cultivated had he not been adopted.

Syd Henderson wrote:
MGamesCook wrote:
[Reveal] Spoiler:
...the cheesy, forced fetal position.



You're upset because she acted like a normal human being?


Well, NASA doesn't recruit people like her for a job like that, and that's the hard truth fans of this movie should just own up to. A new recruit like her would never have been in that situation. I wouldn't mind that if it werent for gravitys overwhelming self-seriousness.

But the fetal position bothers me more because it looks forced and deliberately staged instead of natural.


Sat Oct 12, 2013 9:07 pm
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Post Re: GRAVITY
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And the main reason for the "Marvel revolution" (which actually started at DC Comics in the mid-'50s) was the Red Scare killing off most other comic book genres and leaving superheroes as the only one to emerge unscathed. Comics were once the fertile province of horror, crime, and sci-fi stories, but you'd never know it now.


I believe that is a tad bit inaccurate as the reason was not a Red Scare but the concern from a variety of groups like educators,churches,civic groups and parents that started in the late 1930's about juvenile delinquency and the media being uneducational and trash compare to real books. Their activism caused the the industry to set up their own production code in 1954 much like Hollywood at the time. You see the exact same dynamics today with video games and music being classified like movies for parent's benefit.

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f I had to guess why some people have a hard time relating to Superman, it's the same reason why people like to tear down any hero. There's something in our psychology that feels more comfortable confirming our own base nature, rather than taking the awful responsibility of recognizing our equally great potential to live up to our ideas. When hard-pressed, those people will probably admit that they don't particularly identify with a mega-rich guy with issues or a 30-year-old genius superhero who still can't remember to leave rent money for his frail old auntie, but those characters are often characterized as vengeful and self-loathing. And those things are an unfortunately common source of literary comfort food.


That sounds a bit overboard. I am sure that there is a niche of hardcore fanboys who really go for him but when it come to casual fans of comics and movies they don't find him as cool or sexy as Batman or Spiderman.At least I have not come across one yet. You even have James Franco's quote:

I can understand the appeal the original Superman comics had for the WWII generation and its need for a hero to rid the world of evil, but in my days as a young man, this appeal was long outstripped by the cheesiness of the character’s suit and his douchey invincibility.

Franco is overstating his case a bit but there is a sentiment where some characters are more adult and Superman a bit juvenile as well as hard to relate to. He is a better character when your a real little kid when I was watching reruns of George Reeves in 1969. He was the equivalent of Roy Rogers to the cowboys genre.


Mon Oct 14, 2013 4:05 am
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Post Re: GRAVITY
*sigh* It seems no matter what the movie, the conversation always shifts back toward superheroes.....

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Mon Oct 14, 2013 12:42 pm
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Post Re: GRAVITY
oakenshield32 wrote:
I believe that is a tad bit inaccurate as the reason was not a Red Scare but the concern from a variety of groups like educators,churches,civic groups and parents that started in the late 1930's about juvenile delinquency and the media being uneducational and trash compare to real books. Their activism caused the the industry to set up their own production code in 1954 much like Hollywood at the time. You see the exact same dynamics today with video games and music being classified like movies for parent's benefit.
All part and parcel of a time when anything that couldn't be branded as wholesome and patriotic was cast under suspicion, and that anything that wanted to stick around had to pander to the nations, newfound mania for conformity in the face of the Big, Scary Other.

oakenshield32 wrote:
That sounds a bit overboard. I am sure that there is a niche of hardcore fanboys who really go for him but when it come to casual fans of comics and movies they don't find him as cool or sexy as Batman or Spiderman.At least I have not come across one yet. You even have James Franco's quote:

I can understand the appeal the original Superman comics had for the WWII generation and its need for a hero to rid the world of evil, but in my days as a young man, this appeal was long outstripped by the cheesiness of the character’s suit and his douchey invincibility.

Franco is overstating his case a bit but there is a sentiment where some characters are more adult and Superman a bit juvenile as well as hard to relate to. He is a better character when your a real little kid when I was watching reruns of George Reeves in 1969. He was the equivalent of Roy Rogers to the cowboys genre.

I hope the irony there is clear--Batman and Spider-Man, the perpetually adolescent characters as non-juvenile.

Superman, in my view, is a character you grow out of, then grow back into. Yeah, he's great when you're a kid, but then there's a time when you're angry and confused and he stops making sense. Then you grow up and realize that the problems of the world are more complex than a simple application of power, then he starts to make sense again. You see him in these stories where he tries to bring food to everyone in the world but is met with fear and government opposition at every turn, or when he has to decide whether or not to intervene when workers in a village are being treated poorly by the industrialist who brings work to their town. You start to see the man in the superman--the hero who can do anything and wants to do everything, but must decide whether or not he should. That, for my money, is grown-up superhero storytelling.

I'm not going to pretend I don't see the appeal of Batman and Spider-Man, because they are great characters. But I think I'm onto something when I highlight them as adolescent characters--Batman, the man with the singleminded urge to carve out his own vision of a society where kids no longer have to lose their parents to a senseless crime, and Spider-Man, the man who still believes that everything that goes wrong in the world is his fault and constantly punishes himself over it. Their worldviews are somewhat more self-serving, which is something that we need sometimes. Batman says we can be cool and make everything okay with sheer force of will, and Spider-Man says that whether things are going good or bad, you're still an important player in the game.

That's all very oversimplified, but of course it is. I'm not doing a discourse on superhero lit-crit in a thread that's not even about superheroes.

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Mon Oct 14, 2013 4:08 pm
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Post Re: GRAVITY
These are really neat. A must-see if you're a fan of movie poster design.

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Tue Oct 15, 2013 3:08 pm
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Post Re: GRAVITY
Geeez, five pages on this thread... I can't say I am too surprised that half of it was Vexer and somebody else exchanging blows about something. :lol:

JB did such a great job pimping out the movies 3D that I was actually convinced to pay the extra surcharge (in IMAX too. Double whammy!!!!). I'm not a huge proponent of 3D, but I agree that it was certainly worth it. Amazing!!!

"Cast Away in Space" would be a fair description, with her "Wilson" being

[Reveal] Spoiler:
The Chinese radio chatter that she had tapped into...


or

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Ghost Clooney! :o


Loved it.



Awesome. I especially loved the old school design. ;)


Fri Oct 18, 2013 11:18 am
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Post Re: GRAVITY
Gravity wins the boxoffice for the third week in a row. Not bad taking out Tom Hanks and Captain Phillips and a teen friendly Carrie. Their dropoff is less than 50% each week which means the word of mouth is spreading and people are seeing the movie more than once. Nice to see a solid movie get properly appreciated by the audience.


Mon Oct 21, 2013 3:12 pm
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Post Re: GRAVITY
It is not entirely true that you don't get a second chance to make a first impression. I was a fan of "The Fifth Dimension" but initially had reservations about the third.

My first exposure to 3D was cringeworthy. I felt targeted by the flying objects in Avatar and was initially loathe to endure expanded dimensions again. It is part of my tendency to embrace the future slowly. (I have not progressed beyond an iPhone 3G but have no eight tracks squirreled away )

Ultimately, I have come to appreciate and enjoy 3D in specific situations, leaning more to the floating than the flinging but hope it will not become ubiquitous like being offered a pepper grinder in restaurants.

Just my observations….being lunged at by a crouching tiger is preferable to ducking an oncoming boomerang. Scorsese's Hugo clockwork was magically pleasant and Gravity would not have felt as realistic viewed in traditional 2d. However, The Impossible would have still been possible as a conventional film since it was story driven not just dependent on special effects.

There is one objection and I do realize shooting in 3D inflates a budget. Some theaters do not give patrons a choice and a film made both ways is only available in 3D and admission costs more.

Anyone remember "Smell-O-Vision"? If that gets tacked on to 3D on top of real butter on popcorn, and a jiggling seat, might as well live inside the movie theater. You can't be knocked over by a bicycle on the sidewalk. It will just seem like it.

Gravity was good space for me. I have been earthbound for so long and having George Clooney around, even too briefly didn't hurt.

I was reluctant to return the special glasses and another twist of pepper would be good, thanks!


Thu Oct 31, 2013 5:53 pm
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Post Re: GRAVITY
I saw Gravity in 3D. It was my first time ever watching a movie in 3D and I LOVED it!

I guess I'm not much of a critic but it never occurred to me to place this movie on any kind of pedestal or to be disappointed it didn't explore more lofty themes. It was pure Hollywood... fantastic entertainment. I haven't been so enthralled watching a movie since Jurassic Park!

The special effects were amazing. Yes, sometimes you could take your glasses off and it was easier to see what was going on. But there were also occasions where it felt like things were floating in front of my face and when I felt physically immersed in the action and that was a wonderful experience.

I was lucky not to have to pay much of a surcharge at my local Omniplex.. I didn't have to return the glasses either and I will definitely be going back for a second viewing!


Tue Nov 12, 2013 4:31 pm
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Post Re: GRAVITY
Watch the other side of Sandra Bullock's distress call in Aningaaq.

Manipulative, but still effective and works well as that call's companion piece.


Thu Nov 21, 2013 5:56 am
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Post Re: GRAVITY
peng wrote:
Watch the other side of Sandra Bullock's distress call in Aningaaq.

Manipulative, but still effective and works well as that call's companion piece.


Check out the intro to a recent SNL doing a parody of Gravity. Hysterical!


Thu Nov 21, 2013 9:10 am
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Post Re: GRAVITY
Gravity was a fantastic film overall, and I'm surprised there wasn't more mention of one of its biggest pluses for me: running time. I can't think of the last time a phenomenally well-received film (at the box office and/or in the press) ran a mere hour and a half, especially if one eliminates Disney animated films. It's particularly noteworthy given the number of Avatar mentions in this thread; after all, one could watch Gravity twice in the time it took Cameron's film to tell its derivative tale.


Sat Dec 14, 2013 7:07 pm
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Post Re: GRAVITY
Gwaihir wrote:
Gravity was a fantastic film overall, and I'm surprised there wasn't more mention of one of its biggest pluses for me: running time. I can't think of the last time a phenomenally well-received film (at the box office and/or in the press) ran a mere hour and a half, especially if one eliminates Disney animated films. It's particularly noteworthy given the number of Avatar mentions in this thread; after all, one could watch Gravity twice in the time it took Cameron's film to tell its derivative tale.


Indeed. Brevity is underrated. Some stories span more time and demand a longer running length, but Gravity is the perfect length. Between this and Fruitvale Station, the 90-minute movie might be making a comeback.

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Sat Dec 14, 2013 7:39 pm
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Post Re: GRAVITY
KWRoss wrote:
Gwaihir wrote:
Gravity was a fantastic film overall, and I'm surprised there wasn't more mention of one of its biggest pluses for me: running time. I can't think of the last time a phenomenally well-received film (at the box office and/or in the press) ran a mere hour and a half, especially if one eliminates Disney animated films. It's particularly noteworthy given the number of Avatar mentions in this thread; after all, one could watch Gravity twice in the time it took Cameron's film to tell its derivative tale.


Indeed. Brevity is underrated. Some stories span more time and demand a longer running length, but Gravity is the perfect length. Between this and Fruitvale Station, the 90-minute movie might be making a comeback.

I definitely agree with that, Fruitvale Station told it's story very well without having to drag things out for an eternity like so many awful Oscar bait films in the past have(Meet Joe Black anyone? There is NO good reason at all why that film had to be three fucking hours long)


Sat Dec 14, 2013 7:44 pm
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Post Re: GRAVITY
KWRoss wrote:
Gwaihir wrote:
Gravity was a fantastic film overall, and I'm surprised there wasn't more mention of one of its biggest pluses for me: running time. I can't think of the last time a phenomenally well-received film (at the box office and/or in the press) ran a mere hour and a half, especially if one eliminates Disney animated films. It's particularly noteworthy given the number of Avatar mentions in this thread; after all, one could watch Gravity twice in the time it took Cameron's film to tell its derivative tale.


Indeed. Brevity is underrated. Some stories span more time and demand a longer running length, but Gravity is the perfect length. Between this and Fruitvale Station, the 90-minute movie might be making a comeback.


Great. Yet another reason I'm sorry I missed Fruitvale Station.


Sat Dec 14, 2013 8:09 pm
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Oh yeah, Meet Joe Black. I enjoy some of the performances but man, one of the most puzzling pacing of all time.


Sat Dec 14, 2013 11:55 pm
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Post Re: GRAVITY
Gwaihir wrote:
Gravity was a fantastic film overall, and I'm surprised there wasn't more mention of one of its biggest pluses for me: running time. I can't think of the last time a phenomenally well-received film (at the box office and/or in the press) ran a mere hour and a half, especially if one eliminates Disney animated films. It's particularly noteworthy given the number of Avatar mentions in this thread; after all, one could watch Gravity twice in the time it took Cameron's film to tell its derivative tale.


Gravity may be shorter than Avatar, but it's not less derivative of a dozen other movies that have already been made. I'm rewatching it now, my God this shit is condescending and treats its viewers like idiots. The opening caption: "600 km above earth there is nothing to carry sound, no air pressure, no oxygen. Life in space is impossible." Yeah I passed the first grade, so I know that already. I'm tired of having movies talk down to me like this.


Tue Dec 17, 2013 1:22 am
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Post Re: GRAVITY
Really? How many movies have you seen that have accurately and consistently conveyed those facts to you?

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Tue Dec 17, 2013 1:42 am
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Post Re: GRAVITY
Obviously, 2001 does it, but a vast majority of space-based films ignore this simple fact. I think a quick little blurb like that before the film proper starts is useful because so many casual moviegoers forget it.

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Tue Dec 17, 2013 2:06 am
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