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Cinephilia and FOMO 
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Post Cinephilia and FOMO
www.popmatters.com/column/179957-cineph ... ssing-out/

Really interesting article about how the current age of digital content makes it impossible to watch everything, and how various products can use that fact to fuel their own hype. What results is that no two "cinephiles" are ever on the same page anymore. People watch different things.

My personal solution is just to avoid TV. Dozens of shows have varying degrees of massive hype right now. Even if some of them are good, I'm not gonna spend hundreds of hours watching all of them. There's more content out there than I'd care to even know about. If I were to get into it, I'd start with older content: popular shows from the 50s-90s, many of which are no less interesting than anything they put out today.

So many different sects of movie buff makes it impossible to keep track of absolutely everything.


Sun Aug 03, 2014 4:57 am
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
It's an interesting article, and a true one for that matter. There are so many things to watch that it's indeed impossible to "consume" everything. However, I don't agree that a solution is to "avoid" a whole medium altogether. I mean, at the end of the day, it's an individual, personal choice, but avoiding TV would've led me to miss some great shows like Game of Thrones, The Shield, or The Wire. And frankly, with the renaissance that most people agree that TV is in right now, I don't see why one would avoid it altogether. I, for one, try to watch as most stuff as I can, whenever I can, without neglecting my family, my work, or other interests.

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Sun Aug 03, 2014 1:51 pm
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
Lucky for me that i'm kind of picky about what I watch, so i'm not too worried about "missing out" on everything, i'm not going to see a film/TV show just because critics are falling all over themselves praising it, that's more likely to turn me off from seeing it then anything else. I'm more likely to go for shows that aren't getting tons of hype.

When it comes to TV, I mostly like sitcoms, i'm not real big on drama/thriller/crime series, they just don't hold my attention very often. Most of the ones that were massively overpraised by critics like LOST just left me bored stiff to the point where I couldn't care about any of the characters. Game of Thrones does not interest me one bit and i'm kind of glad it dosen't, because I feel sorry for all the fans that have to wait eons for the next book to come out, and i'm happy that i'm not one of them.

With films, I generally tend to gravitate towards action, comedy, sci-fi and horror movies, i'm generally not that picky about them, but with dramas and thrillers, i'm a bit choosier.

I buy unlicensed sets of TV series on Ioffer that have virtually no chance of ever getting an official DVD or digital release(especially true for older TV series), because that's the only way to see them.

I watch a lot of Direct-to-video films and there are many others I want to get, in order to keep track of them, I go to the film's page on Amazon or Half.com, add it to my favorites, then delete that and send it to the Recycle Bin, then transfer it to my movies folder, which has a long list of titles that I want to see someday.


Sun Aug 03, 2014 2:33 pm
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
MGamesCook wrote:
http://www.popmatters.com/column/179957-cinephilia-culture-and-the-fear-of-missing-out/

Really interesting article about how the current age of digital content makes it impossible to watch everything, and how various products can use that fact to fuel their own hype. What results is that no two "cinephiles" are ever on the same page anymore. People watch different things.

My personal solution is just to avoid TV. Dozens of shows have varying degrees of massive hype right now. Even if some of them are good, I'm not gonna spend hundreds of hours watching all of them. There's more content out there than I'd care to even know about. If I were to get into it, I'd start with older content: popular shows from the 50s-90s, many of which are no less interesting than anything they put out today.

So many different sects of movie buff makes it impossible to keep track of absolutely everything.


Thanks for the link, it's an interesting article and very accurate. It is impossible to "watch everything" and the list of things to watch in order to have "credibility" to speak with authority on film and TV continues to grow.

I disagree with your solution, though. Avoiding TV is not the answer. You simply have to listen to the incredibly knowledgeable people on this forum, and to other critics/"experts" to be selective in what you watch. If you avoid TV, you have failed to see such shows as The Wire and Breaking Bad which I consider two of the best artistic experiences ever, regardless of medium, right up there with The Sandman series by Neil Gaiman, various paintings by Caravaggio, Bosch, Velazquez, the 2nd movement of Beethoven's ninth or his Moonlight Sonata, hearing Don Maclean singing Vincent live while sitting in the first row at a community college... Simply not to be missed. Not to mention the 2nd tier of quality like Game of Thrones, House of Cards, Deadwood, Sopranos, 6 feet under, etc.

You are doing yourself a disservice by not watching these...


Sun Aug 03, 2014 4:50 pm
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
I tried getting into Breaking Bad and it just didn't do much for me, I lost interest fairly quickly and had no real urge to finish out the series. This clip kinda sums it up whenever I hear people going on and on about that show:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIom3LSbB0I

Sopranos I do like, Deadwood not so much.

One show I would highly recommend is Newsroom.


Sun Aug 03, 2014 5:07 pm
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
I dunno, I think Cook has a point. I watched a lot of TV over the years, but have rarely got the urge to rewatch any of the 'great' shows years later, while I do get that urge with many great movies, as many true film fans do. TV seems to be very much about 'now,' not of all time. All in the Family & Hill Street Blues were probably considered as good as any TV shows in history when they originally aired, but does anyone go back and watch them today? But I imagine many young film buffs today seek out, say, Dog Day Afternoon or Fitzcarraldo or whatever to be more informed. Do you really think a young TV buff in the year 2030 is going to check out Breaking Bad?

Yeah I enjoy Game of Thrones, Sopranos, etc as much as anyone. Great as some of these shows are, TV to me seems to just be a way to kill some time and chat with coworkers(and these are coworkers who seem to hardly watch any movies at all. wonder what draws so many of these people to watch every episode of every HBO show, but not to seek out Boyhood etc) about something on Mondays.

Look at this great thread
viewtopic.php?f=27&t=7099&start=0


somehow I doubt a thread where someone reviews all 122 episodes of The Wire & Breaking Bad would get the same sort of attention (watching 60 new movies is basically the equivalent of watching the entire runs of those 2 shows combined. wow.)


Sun Aug 03, 2014 5:39 pm
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
I'll always prefer movies to television by a wide margin. But tv is still filmmaking, and as fans of filmmaking, it deserves at least some of our attention. To counter calvero's statement about rewatches, I've already rewatched True Detective, and plan on doing it again in the future. Television also has the ability to flesh out characters better than movies. Again, I like movies better and it's not even close. But we shouldn't totally disregard tv.

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Sun Aug 03, 2014 5:47 pm
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
^when I was 18, I think I watched almost every movie I rented at least twice. And quite a few theatrical rewatches as well. As you get older, time will start being very valuable to you(and you will have less time...)


Sun Aug 03, 2014 6:11 pm
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
Well, I am "older" and I have rewatched The Wire at least 5 times, Breaking Bad the same, and have already watched True Detective twice, every time discovering more depth and detail in each one. Totally worth it. If that means I have missed some mediocre movie, or even a good movie, then so be it.


Sun Aug 03, 2014 6:20 pm
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
I rarely rewatch shows nowadays, I feel that my time is better spent seeking out new movies and TV shows.


Sun Aug 03, 2014 7:47 pm
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
I watch roughly an equal amount of TV and movies. Prefer the latter (but not by a wide margin), and have to date never rewatched a TV show (the time commitment is an order of magnitude higher than rewatching a single movie).


Sun Aug 03, 2014 8:02 pm
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
MunichMan wrote:
Well, I am "older" and I have rewatched The Wire at least 5 times, Breaking Bad the same, and have already watched True Detective twice, every time discovering more depth and detail in each one. Totally worth it. If that means I have missed some mediocre movie, or even a good movie, then so be it.


I rewatched Season 3 of Game of Thrones right before the fourth one started and it was such a great experience. Watching the plot unfold knowing everything that will happen later added so many layers to events and character actions. I really, really love this show and if it continues as such, it's bound to dethrone my current #1.

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Sun Aug 03, 2014 8:32 pm
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
All the things I like about movies are specific to movies. A character supposedly being developed over 100 hours? Not interested.

Here's the irony: it's in this current "renaissance" age that TV has begun to be championed as being as good or better than movies. But that happened largely because TV sought actively to make itself more like movies. Specifically, the advent of single cam TV, bigger budgets, TV/film actor crossovers. And most of all, the new emphasis on 100 hour narrative continuity across several years. You never had that before with TV from the 50s-80s. That was much more episodic. I mean sure, there was some basic broad continuity with a sitcom like Friends, but with these new hype machine shows, it's more like it's trying to be a 100 hour movie rather than 100 1-hour movies. But the latter would be much more inviting for me personally.

So if TV became better by being more like movies, then TV really never became better as TV at all. Doesn't matter to me, because I believe the essence of film and cinema is the brevity: the 90-180 minute pockets of experience. All this other stuff may have value to some people, but it's not really cinema IMO, and I'm not sure really filmmaking. If there's one show I might consider giving a try, it would probably be Sherlock, since that one comes in smaller packages.

Spielberg, Hitchcock, Scorsese, Tarantino are all household names. Which directors of Lost, Breaking Bad, or Game of Thrones are household names? In 2040, Jaws and Star Wars will still be universally known, at 2 hours apiece. Will Breaking Bad still be universally known at nearly 50 hours?


Sun Aug 03, 2014 11:20 pm
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
MGamesCook wrote:
Here's the irony: it's in this current "renaissance" age that TV has begun to be championed as being as good or better than movies. But that happened largely because TV sought actively to make itself more like movies. Specifically, the advent of single cam TV, bigger budgets, TV/film actor crossovers. And most of all, the new emphasis on 100 hour narrative continuity across several years.


DING DING DING!!!!!! Yup, it's all about getting edgier and playing around with the format to enhance the drama to something movie-like. The renaissance of TV today owes a lot to the movies that begot it. I really don't wanna hate on TV or binge-watchers; it's their passion the same way movies, music, sports, or politics can be someone's passion.

The so-called 100-hour narrative is a mountain for me too. That's why I appreciate the anthology approach of TRUE DETECTIVE; 8 hours in one season, then it starts over next year with a brand new story. Way more manageable.

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Sun Aug 03, 2014 11:32 pm
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
Quote:
That's why I appreciate the anthology approach of TRUE DETECTIVE; 8 hours in one season, then it starts over next year with a brand new story. Way more manageable.


Sure, I can agree to that. I've watched a few mini-series, and its arguably a different kind of beast entirely. I'm a little intrigued by Sherlock. I'm also into the old stuff. Love Twilight Zone, from what I've seen. It's not cinema, but perhaps Rod Serling was an artist to some degree.


Mon Aug 04, 2014 12:35 am
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
As I've mentioned elsewhere, there are things in film you just can't get away with in TV. TV seems to require more straightforward storytelling. Can you imagine more abstract/idiosyncratic filmmakers such as Jim Jarmusch or Terrence Malick trying to work in TV? :| That's why I prefer film.


Mon Aug 04, 2014 11:27 pm
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
I started visiting this website at least a decade ago because I really liked reading film criticism and found that James had a style that was easy to read but provided enough depth for me to be satiated. But I don’t think at any point I could have considered myself a cinephile. I’m just not someone who can spend that much time in front of a theatre or television screen. I have to go out and explore, learn, exercise, improving myself or things around me. I’ll be lucky if I watch a new movie each week, and there’s only a handful of television shows I keep up with. If anything the thing I keep up with most is pro wrestling, but that’s a whole other topic.

But even though I’ll never be one to binge watch TV, I still enjoy it. I’m generally just better around currently broadcast shows, where I can just watch a new episode each week. I understand why people would think of TV as this juggernaut thing that’s difficult to keep up with if you’re behind, but I feel like it’s as much work as you want it to be. Don’t think of a show as a 100+ hour experience if that seems insurmountable, just think of it as something you can enjoy a couple of hours each week in between everything else.


Tue Aug 05, 2014 12:01 am
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
I'm definitely more of a movie person than television, but I will say that there is more great television now than ever before. Also, if I were to rank my favorite shows and movies in one whole list my #1 would be a tie between Lost and 24. Those are the only two shows I would put a head of movies/love more than movies.


Tue Aug 05, 2014 12:08 am
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
I guess I just don't understand the FOMO mentality. Don't get me wrong, there are plenty of movies and TV shows I haven't seen that I want to (on my netflix queue are True Detective, Masters of Sex, Game of Thrones, Boardwalk Empire, The Sopranos, Deadwood and The Wire and working on catching up with The Americans, Covert Affairs, Falling Skies and will stream on netflix to catch up on shows like Mad Men, Dexter, Sons of Anarchy, Louie among many other shows and countless movies I need to catch up on as well). But I don't feel bad about missing out on them. I don't feel left out. I'll get to them eventually.


Tue Aug 05, 2014 12:30 am
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Post Re: Cinephilia and FOMO
ilovemovies wrote:
I'm definitely more of a movie person than television, but I will say that there is more great television now than ever before. Also, if I were to rank my favorite shows and movies in one whole list my #1 would be a tie between Lost and 24. Those are the only two shows I would put a head of movies/love more than movies.


You sure you phrased yourself to express what you really mean? Because based on this post alone, you think everything in both of those shows, including Kim getting chased by a panther, is superior to Citizen Kane, The Godfather, and all other movies that have ever been made?

Having seen only 1 season of Lost, but 5 seasons of 24 (my greatest regret of media consumption in my entire life), I'd have to say that a statement like this doesn't make sense. Hey, I love Bond as much as anything in movies, but I'd be the first to admit he's had some painfully bad moments during his 50-year output. Bond has thus far amounted to around 50 hours, give or take. Some of it has been great, some of it not so great. Anthony Mann, Alfred Hitchcock? Some of their films fucking SUCK. Much as I love their work, I'm still capable of ranking their masterpieces against their crap.

Yet Breaking Bad, Lost, and Game of Thrones, and 24(?) fans try to say that every single last second of every minute of every hour of their shows is a spark of greatness that contributes to an overall flawless, picture-perfect masterpiece. Someone tell me, on what basis is that supposed to be in any way believable, defensible, justifiable, or capable of being taken seriously? Pauline Kael said it best: anyone who fails to distinguish an auteur's good output from their bad isn't qualified to judge either.


Tue Aug 05, 2014 12:40 am
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