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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Balaji Sivaraman wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
Unke wrote:

Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)...I would have preferred it if the conspiracy thriller elements would have been developed into a more complex story, but instead we are treated to a grand CGI action finale with Captain America jumping around flying fortresses. Also, the eponymous character of the Winter Soldier didn’t work for me. Overall, this film is pleasant enough and one of Marvel’s better films, but it’s not quite a good movie. 6/10


I'm completely with you. There were parts here of a good movie, but it didn't add up into a good movie.


I think I liked this one quite a bit more than you guys, but I agree that the necessity to have a big, blow-everything-up climax (*coughs* Man of Steel *coughs*) meant it wasn't as good as it could've been. Look, I realize that summer action films need that bit of oomph for the audiences, but it certainly didn't have to be three rocketships crashing into one another and taking the entire building down as well. That was way overkill for a film, that until that point, was built up subtly in a way few other superhero films are. So disappointing! Still one of the better superhero films out there though, and you could even say that the climax was probably forced right at the end by Marvel Studios so as to satisfy the summer-blockbuster audiences, whoever they are.


Concerning my criticism of the finale of ‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’, I didn’t mean to say that I am generally against climactic, big, CGI-heavy action scenes in superhero movies. The genre lends itself to spectacles like that, just like many Westerns end in a shoot-out. In ‘Thor 2’, the big action scene at the end was the best thing about the movie. In the case of ‘Captain America 2’, the movie seemed to try a more low-key approach, though, and having Captain America jump around exploding helicarriers didn’t seem like the organic conclusion to what was effectively a conspiracy thriller with superheroes. I had the impression that the filmmakers didn’t have the confidence to stick to their original idea, which I found a bit disappointing.

Open your Eyes (1997)
César (Eduardo Noriega) is a rich and handsome playboy, who doesn’t sleep with the same woman twice. When he is stalked by one of his (ex-)lovers at his birthday party, he chats up his best friend’s date Sofia (Penélope Cruz) and, to his own surprise, falls in love with her. Nevertheless, he accepts a ride in his ex-lover’s car, who crashes it into a wall. An unspecified time later, César is in a mental institution, awaiting trial for murder and hiding his disfigured (or is it?) face behind a mask while recollecting his story or dreams to a psychiatrist.
It’s quite difficult to give an idea about what this excellent Spanish movie is about, particularly without revealing too many plot points The movie deals with the theme of reality vs. dreams, but being more specific would probably spoil the fun. I think ‘Open your Eyes’ (‘Abre los Ojos’) is best compared to movies such as ‘Mulholland Dr.’, although it is much more accessible and has a satisfying conclusion. Actually, the conclusion is nearly too neat for my tastes and I wouldn’t have minded if the movie had been open-ended, but that’s just me. At times, the movie is a love story, a drama, a psychological thriller, a horror movie or a science-fiction movie; it really defies classification. I highly recommend this film, which has been remade by Cameron Crowe as ‘Vanilla Sky’ with Tom Cruise in the César-role. Has anybody seen ‘Vanilla Sky’ and ‘Open your Eyes’? Is it worth watching the remake? 8/10

A Man Escaped (1956)
My impression of ‘A Man Escaped’ may be influenced by a documentary on French director Robert Bresson, which I watched right after the movie and which examines his style of moviemaking. According to this documentary, Bresson considered conventional films to be “photographed plays” and tried to make “pure film” without artificiality. Therefore, he didn’t use trained actors, didn’t want them to show any expression, didn’t use music, etc. His aim was to reach “lucidity” and find truth or even transcendence in a minimalist style. For instance, in ‘A Man Escaped’, we know from the title that the French resistance fighter imprisoned in a Nazi prison will escape. There are repetitive shots of him scraping away at the cracks in a wooden door with a sharpened spoon. We see a lot of him sitting in his barren cell, listening to another prisoner knocking on the walls (or not), interspersed with a daily routine of emptying a bucket (which serves as a toilet) in the prison yard and washing himself in the communal washing room, his rare opportunities for minimal contact with other prisoners. There is hardly any dialogue but a lot of voiceover, which doesn’t go much beyond what’s shown on the screen. Surprisingly, all of this is absolutely riveting. Even my wife, who mockingly refers to movies such as this as “those ancient black and white films”, couldn’t help but become engrossed in this movie. I had more empathy for the prisoner’s predicament than I would have in a more conventional prison escape film. It is the anti-'Shawshanks Redemption' (which I find too mawkish). There is a lot of suspense without any of the sophisticated filming techniques of contemporaries like Hitchcock, for instance. It’s as if Bresson is saying: This is how the prison escape worked, these are the facts, you don’t need to see anything else. And you don’t. Just like in ‘Pickpocket’, Bresson completely succeeded in what he set out to do, although I have severe doubts whether this approach works with different material. The above-mentioned documentary featured scenes of the Bresson movies ‘Lancelot du Lac’ and ‘The Devil, Probably’ and, watched in isolation, these scenes looked utterly pretentious and, even worse, dull. ’A Man Escaped’ is a masterpiece, though, and a very watchable one at that. 9/10

Pompeii (2014)
How do you find a transition from French iconoclast director Robert Bresson’s minimalist ‘A Man Escaped’ to certified hack Paul W.S. Anderson’s special effects extravaganza ‘Pompeii’? Easy: Famously, Bresson worked with non-actors and wanted them to be devoid of expression and speak their dialogue in a monotonous, emotionless voice, calling them “models” rather than actors”. With leading man Kit ‘Jon Snow’ Harrington, Anderson has achieved just that (perfect abs, though). Badoom-Tish! But I really shouldn’t make bad jokes about the acting in this movie, because whatever expression is missing from Harrington (the new Orlando Bloom) and his doe-eyed female co-star is more than made up for by the hammy Kiefer Sutherland as a villanous Roman Senator. The acting isn’t important for the success of this movie anyway, which is all about Mount Vesuvius raining hellfire in 3D on the poor citizens of Pompeii in 79 AD, i.e. about special effects. Unfortunately, the CGI looks very poor. The reason for this might very well be the 3D, because the shots were all set up to maximise the effect of stereoscopy. This didn’t translate well at all to watching the movie on a televison set in 2D and live action and computer graphics didn’t seem to be integrated well. Until the volcano finally gets to do its job about an hour into the movie, the audience must endure a storyline lifted wholesale from ‘Gladiator’, which wouldn’t be so bad if the sword fights hadn’t been edited so badly that it is impossible to judge the quality of the fight choreography. ‘Pompeii’ isn’t a total dud, because it moves at a quick pace and occasionally crosses into so-bad-its-kind-of-amusing territory (my favourite bit was when the earth shakes and rumbles and someone reassures our hero “It’s just the mountain. It does that from time to time.”), but it surely is a bad film. 3/10

2-Headed Shark Attack (2012)
If I rate ‘Pompeii’ a 3/10, I would probably have to award ‘2-Headed Shark Attack’ 1/10, if I had watched enough of it to make up my mind before losing patience. This is one of these movies, which seem to be the result of a few stoner friends riffing on bad monster movie titles while passing the reefer. You can imagine them giggling: ‘Sharktopus’, ‘Sharknado’, ‘Piranhaconda’, ‘2-Headed Shark Attack’, tee-hee. And that’s a lot of fun, unlike the movie they eventually made out of it. Thinking of ‘Arachnoshark vs. Mecha-Rhino’ makes me grin, too. Oh no! They’re going to turn this into a movie as well now, won’t they?


Mon Aug 18, 2014 8:28 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Unke wrote:


A Man Escaped (1956)
My impression of ‘A Man Escaped’ may be influenced by a documentary on French director Robert Bresson, which I watched right after the movie and which examines his style of moviemaking. According to this documentary, Bresson considered conventional films to be “photographed plays” and tried to make “pure film” without artificiality. Therefore, he didn’t use trained actors, didn’t want them to show any expression, didn’t use music, etc. His aim was to reach “lucidity” and find truth or even transcendence in a minimalist style. For instance, in ‘A Man Escaped’, we know from the title that the French resistance fighter imprisoned in a Nazi prison will escape. There are repetitive shots of him scraping away at the cracks in a wooden door with a sharpened spoon. We see a lot of him sitting in his barren cell, listening to another prisoner knocking on the walls (or not), interspersed with a daily routine of emptying a bucket (which serves as a toilet) in the prison yard and washing himself in the communal washing room, his rare opportunities for minimal contact with other prisoners. There is hardly any dialogue but a lot of voiceover, which doesn’t go much beyond what’s shown on the screen. Surprisingly, all of this is absolutely riveting. Even my wife, who mockingly refers to movies such as this as “those ancient black and white films”, couldn’t help but become engrossed in this movie. I had more empathy for the prisoner’s predicament than I would have in a more conventional prison escape film. It is the anti-'Shawshanks Redemption' (which I find too mawkish). There is a lot of suspense without any of the sophisticated filming techniques of contemporaries like Hitchcock, for instance. It’s as if Bresson is saying: This is how the prison escape worked, these are the facts, you don’t need to see anything else. And you don’t. Just like in ‘Pickpocket’, Bresson completely succeeded in what he set out to do, although I have severe doubts whether this approach works with different material. The above-mentioned documentary featured scenes of the Bresson movies ‘Lancelot du Lac’ and ‘The Devil, Probably’ and, watched in isolation, these scenes looked utterly pretentious and, even worse, dull. ’A Man Escaped’ is a masterpiece, though, and a very watchable one at that. 9/10


To me this in minimalism at its very, very best. I don't like Bresson's Pickpocket (which is highly regarded) at all, but this movie is a masterpiece.

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Mon Aug 18, 2014 9:06 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Unke wrote:
Open your Eyes (1997)
César (Eduardo Noriega) is a rich and handsome playboy, who doesn’t sleep with the same woman twice. When he is stalked by one of his (ex-)lovers at his birthday party, he chats up his best friend’s date Sofia (Penélope Cruz) and, to his own surprise, falls in love with her. Nevertheless, he accepts a ride in his ex-lover’s car, who crashes it into a wall. An unspecified time later, César is in a mental institution, awaiting trial for murder and hiding his disfigured (or is it?) face behind a mask while recollecting his story or dreams to a psychiatrist.
It’s quite difficult to give an idea about what this excellent Spanish movie is about, particularly without revealing too many plot points The movie deals with the theme of reality vs. dreams, but being more specific would probably spoil the fun. I think ‘Open your Eyes’ (‘Abre los Ojos’) is best compared to movies such as ‘Mulholland Dr.’, although it is much more accessible and has a satisfying conclusion. Actually, the conclusion is nearly too neat for my tastes and I wouldn’t have minded if the movie had been open-ended, but that’s just me. At times, the movie is a love story, a drama, a psychological thriller, a horror movie or a science-fiction movie; it really defies classification. I highly recommend this film, which has been remade by Cameron Crowe as ‘Vanilla Sky’ with Tom Cruise in the César-role. Has anybody seen ‘Vanilla Sky’ and ‘Open your Eyes’? Is it worth watching the remake? 8/10


I saw Abre los Ojos a couple of years before the remake was released, and I loved it. Mesmerizing, captivating, well-acted, and intense. I liked some things that Crowe brought to the table (particularly in terms of the imagery of the moments) and Cameron Díaz was better than her Spanish counterpart, but the overall effect of Vanilla Sky was lacking when compared to the original.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Lego Movie - 3 stars out of 4

Highly enjoyable, visually pleasing and actually quite clever at times, with some terrific voice acting by the cast. And yet, because of the critical raves this received, my expectations were probably too high and therefore weren't met. So I couldn't help but feel a tad letdown. But I still very much enjoyed this movie.


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The Zero Theorem (2013)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2333804/
Christoph Waltz stars in this futuristic (really more of a satirical look at where we are heading) film directed by Terry Gilliam about a reclusive dissatisfied mathematician who wants more from life than the daily grind (which is depicted quite literally) - at least that's how it starts out, it gets somewhat bogged down in bizarre incomprehensible events after that. Matt Damon, Tilda Swinton, David Thewlis and Mélanie Thierry have supporting roles. Visually striking and ambitious, as we have come to expect from Gilliam, with elements of Gilliam's own Brazil (especially), Dr. Seuess, Orwell's 1984 and David Cronenbergs's eXistenZ prevail, but unfortunately also there is more than a bit of Richard Kelly's total dud Southland Tales thrown in for good measure. I'm not really sure what this film is supposed to be about exactly (I found the narrative somewhat muddled), although dissatisfaction with/pointlessness of life seem to be the main themes. The Zero Theorem is imo a bit of a mess, albeit a glorious one. Nonetheless it is a must see for fans of Gilliam.
5.5/10


Mon Aug 18, 2014 4:23 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Key Largo (1948)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0040506/
After the recent death of Lauren Bacall, I realised I hadn't really seen a great deal of her work. Now that Mr. Kunz has defeated my "The Guess That Movie Game (NO NUDITY)" entry, seemingly without even really trying, I will post some thoughts.
Humphrey Bogart plays the CO of a deceased soldier who is in Key Largo to visit the widow (Bacall) and her father (Lionel Barrymore) who are managers of a hotel. Unbeknownst to them, the hotel is occupied by gangsters who are using it as a drop-off point. Their problems are further compounded by an approaching hurricane, effectively trapping them in the hotel with said gangsters. While the oft-talked about on-screen chemistry of Bacall and Bogart is imo very much MIA in this film, Bacall herself is luminous. The story itself is interesting enough to hold one's attention, but is let down somewhat by an imo unnecessary final shootout.
7/10.


Mon Aug 18, 2014 9:00 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Thief12 wrote:
Unke wrote:
Open your Eyes (1997)
César (Eduardo Noriega) is a rich and handsome playboy, who doesn’t sleep with the same woman twice. When he is stalked by one of his (ex-)lovers at his birthday party, he chats up his best friend’s date Sofia (Penélope Cruz) and, to his own surprise, falls in love with her. Nevertheless, he accepts a ride in his ex-lover’s car, who crashes it into a wall. An unspecified time later, César is in a mental institution, awaiting trial for murder and hiding his disfigured (or is it?) face behind a mask while recollecting his story or dreams to a psychiatrist.
It’s quite difficult to give an idea about what this excellent Spanish movie is about, particularly without revealing too many plot points The movie deals with the theme of reality vs. dreams, but being more specific would probably spoil the fun. I think ‘Open your Eyes’ (‘Abre los Ojos’) is best compared to movies such as ‘Mulholland Dr.’, although it is much more accessible and has a satisfying conclusion. Actually, the conclusion is nearly too neat for my tastes and I wouldn’t have minded if the movie had been open-ended, but that’s just me. At times, the movie is a love story, a drama, a psychological thriller, a horror movie or a science-fiction movie; it really defies classification. I highly recommend this film, which has been remade by Cameron Crowe as ‘Vanilla Sky’ with Tom Cruise in the César-role. Has anybody seen ‘Vanilla Sky’ and ‘Open your Eyes’? Is it worth watching the remake? 8/10


I saw Abre los Ojos a couple of years before the remake was released, and I loved it. Mesmerizing, captivating, well-acted, and intense. I liked some things that Crowe brought to the table (particularly in terms of the imagery of the moments) and Cameron Díaz was better than her Spanish counterpart, but the overall effect of Vanilla Sky was lacking when compared to the original.


I saw Crowe's film first, but I think this is one of those cases where the remake stands apart from the original enough to make it worthwhile in its own right. While it has the same kind of unclassifiable, shifting tone as the original, much more emphasis is placed on the romance and the melancholic nature of the subject matter than on the mystery/horror elements. Give it a shot I say; even if you don't find it entirely successful, it's still interesting to watch Crowe stepping outside his comfort zone.

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Mon Aug 18, 2014 9:36 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
The Zero Theorem (2013)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2333804/
Christoph Waltz stars in this futuristic (really more of a satirical look at where we are heading) film directed by Terry Gilliam about a reclusive dissatisfied mathematician who wants more from life than the daily grind (which is depicted quite literally) - at least that's how it starts out, it gets somewhat bogged down in bizarre incomprehensible events after that. Matt Damon, Tilda Swinton, David Thewlis and Mélanie Thierry have supporting roles. Visually striking and ambitious, as we have come to expect from Gilliam, with elements of Gilliam's own Brazil (especially), Dr. Seuess, Orwell's 1984 and David Cronenbergs's eXistenZ prevail, but unfortunately also there is more than a bit of Richard Kelly's total dud Southland Tales thrown in for good measure. I'm not really sure what this film is supposed to be about exactly (I found the narrative somewhat muddled), although dissatisfaction with/pointlessness of life seem to be the main themes. The Zero Theorem is imo a bit of a mess, albeit a glorious one. Nonetheless it is a must see for fans of Gilliam.
5.5/10

Granted, nearly all of Gilliam's films are messes (outside of the ones he made with Monty Python) -- but they're fascinating messes. I still think the much-maligned "Tideland" is his best film after "Brazil" and "Time Bandits" (again, the Python films notwithstanding). And Richard Kelly is sort of his next-generation counterpart (albeit not quite as skilled... and definitely not as humorous).


Mon Aug 18, 2014 10:14 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Calvary (2014)

This is a sort of theological High Noon. Brendan Gleeson plays Father Lavelle who has received a death threat from a parishioner that he will be killed in seven days for abuse the man has suffered in the past from the clergy. We follow Father Lavelle for the 7 days as he and we meet the different people who make up his flock till the fateful day. Brendan Gleeson carries the whole movie on his broad shoulders and his Father Lavelle is a well read,clever,thoughtful but street smart man with an old school dogmatic vision of right and wrong that clashes with rest of the world's 50 Shades of Grey amorality. The movie does bring up a few important issues and ideas and the scenes Gleeson has with Kelly Reilly who plays his daughter and Marie-Josee Croze as a French widow work very well. The problem is that all the Irish villagers are shown as such hateful whack jobs and ignorant jackasses(the only normal people are the French widow and American expat) it begins to look like the village is part a Fringe Festival Play which makes you wonder why the heck Father Lavelle even bothers at all but yet he doesn't give up on them even his would be killer. I thought the Coen Brothers did a better job with A Serious Man about why the universe makes a decent person suffer for no apparent reason. Calvary has enough good ideas and good moments that you can overlook the idea of why such a smart man would do such a dumb thing for such selfish and clueless people.


Tue Aug 19, 2014 6:33 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Quote:
Humphrey Bogart plays the CO of a deceased soldier who is in Key Largo to visit the widow (Bacall) and her father (Lionel Barrymore) who are managers of a hotel. Unbeknownst to them, the hotel is occupied by gangsters who are using it as a drop-off point. Their problems are further compounded by an approaching hurricane, effectively trapping them in the hotel with said gangsters. While the oft-talked about on-screen chemistry of Bacall and Bogart is imo very much MIA in this film, Bacall herself is luminous.


I imagine having Bogart & Robinson together in a movie back then was sort of like De Niro & Pacino in Heat. Historic. and Lionel Barrymore & Claire Trevor as well. That's quite a cast.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Dead Calm: Normally I don't like minimalist movies. They're usually acts of ego to impress the "If I don't get it than it must be amazing" crowd. But done effectively, they can be good movies. "Dead Calm" works because it's all mood and anticipation. Billy Zane makes a great psycho because he makes the character a real person rather than a one-dimensional villain. The atmosphere is so-so, but there are some great shots in the film. 3/4

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Boy, JB really didn't give this movie the beating it deserves. This is a truly awful...thing!. It's a soul-sucking cash cow meant to get shallow teenagers into the film and steal their cash. There's no other reason for its creation. 1/4

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
moviemkr7 wrote:
Dead Calm: Normally I don't like minimalist movies. They're usually acts of ego to impress the "If I don't get it than it must be amazing" crowd. But done effectively, they can be good movies. "Dead Calm" works because it's all mood and anticipation. Billy Zane makes a great psycho because he makes the character a real person rather than a one-dimensional villain. The atmosphere is so-so, but there are some great shots in the film. 3/4

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Boy, JB really didn't give this movie the beating it deserves. This is a truly awful...thing!. It's a soul-sucking cash cow meant to get shallow teenagers into the film and steal their cash. There's no other reason for its creation. 1/4

I thought TMNT was a really solid and enjoyable film, I wouldn't call it "soul-sucking" in the least.


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Quote:
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Boy, JB really didn't give this movie the beating it deserves. This is a truly awful...thing!. It's a soul-sucking cash cow meant to get shallow teenagers into the film and steal their cash. There's no other reason for its creation. 1/4



No way.

Was a major event upon its release

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
moviemkr7 wrote:
Dead Calm: Normally I don't like minimalist movies. They're usually acts of ego to impress the "If I don't get it than it must be amazing" crowd. But done effectively, they can be good movies. "Dead Calm" works because it's all mood and anticipation. Billy Zane makes a great psycho because he makes the character a real person rather than a one-dimensional villain. The atmosphere is so-so, but there are some great shots in the film. 3/4



No offense dude, but movies that feature people getting shot in the face with flare guns and their heads exploding are not "minimalist." This movie is certainly not made by Robert Bresson

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
moviemkr7 wrote:
Dead Calm: Normally I don't like minimalist movies. They're usually acts of ego to impress the "If I don't get it than it must be amazing" crowd. But done effectively, they can be good movies. "Dead Calm" works because it's all mood and anticipation. Billy Zane makes a great psycho because he makes the character a real person rather than a one-dimensional villain. The atmosphere is so-so, but there are some great shots in the film. 3/4

No offense dude, but movies that feature people getting shot in the face with flare guns and their heads exploding are not "minimalist." This movie is certainly not made by Robert Bresson

Or Asghar Farhadi.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Brain Slasher (aka Mindwarp) (1992)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0100152/
B-Grade post-apocalyptic exploitation film starring Bruce Campbell as an "out-worlder" survivor who meets a young female "in-worlder" after she is exiled. While in-worlders entire lives consist of being plugged into a virtual reality machine safely underground, out-worlders eke out a subsistence living on the desolate surface. The two are soon captured by cannibal mutants who spend their lives in an cult where they are forced to mine underground for useless items from a landfill. Made by Fangoria Films, there is, as one would hope, copious blood and viscera for most of the running length (definitely not one for the squeamish), but it's all so very campy. And did I mention it stars Bruce Campbell? Well it stars Bruce Campbell. Bruce. Campbell.
6.5/10.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
moviemkr7 wrote:
Dead Calm: Normally I don't like minimalist movies. They're usually acts of ego to impress the "If I don't get it than it must be amazing" crowd. But done effectively, they can be good movies. "Dead Calm" works because it's all mood and anticipation. Billy Zane makes a great psycho because he makes the character a real person rather than a one-dimensional villain. The atmosphere is so-so, but there are some great shots in the film. 3/4



No offense dude, but movies that feature people getting shot in the face with flare guns and their heads exploding are not "minimalist." This movie is certainly not made by Robert Bresson


I suppose it can be considered "minimalist" in that it has only three characters, simple settings (2 boats), and a simple, straightforward plot. Plus, the "shooting-flare-in-face" is only the last scene which, if I remember correctly, was added in the end to please audiences. Other than that, the film is mostly high tension with little actual action, if I remember correctly. I like it a lot.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Thief12 wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
moviemkr7 wrote:
Dead Calm: Normally I don't like minimalist movies. They're usually acts of ego to impress the "If I don't get it than it must be amazing" crowd. But done effectively, they can be good movies. "Dead Calm" works because it's all mood and anticipation. Billy Zane makes a great psycho because he makes the character a real person rather than a one-dimensional villain. The atmosphere is so-so, but there are some great shots in the film. 3/4



No offense dude, but movies that feature people getting shot in the face with flare guns and their heads exploding are not "minimalist." This movie is certainly not made by Robert Bresson


I suppose it can be considered "minimalist" in that it has only three characters, simple settings (2 boats), and a simple, straightforward plot. Plus, the "shooting-flare-in-face" is only the last scene which, if I remember correctly, was added in the end to please audiences. Other than that, the film is mostly high tension with little actual action, if I remember correctly. I like it a lot.


Thank you!

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Human Centipede 2

You would think that one Human Centipede film pretty much stretched the boundaries of everything that could be accomplished with that film's premise. But no; apparently there was room for a sequel, and director Tom Six goes in a completely different direction with this one. The focus is not on a mad doctor, but on a middle-aged, obese and mildly retarded man named Martin, who is obsessed with the first Human Centipede film and desires to make his own human centipede with a dozen people.

This film is shot in black and white, and thank God for that. It is gory, grisly and gratuitous; it is also about as close to a surrealistic nightmare I've ever seen on screen. Six seems to channel The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and early Bunuel in this film, creating an atmosphere that is distorted, unnerving and also very unrealistic in its contrasts and awkward camera angles. Martin never speaks throughout the entire film, and the effect is to rend him monstrous and not human at all.

Is it good? I guess that depends on your definition of good. A horror film that works is one that plays like a nightmare, and so this certainly qualifies. Yet most will be completely repulsed. I would give it a recommendation for fans of horror and avant-garde cinema. Everyone else should watch at their own risk.

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Thu Aug 21, 2014 12:59 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Sexual Chocolate wrote:
The Human Centipede 2
You would think that one Human Centipede film pretty much stretched the boundaries of everything that could be accomplished with that film's premise. But no; apparently there was room for a sequel

The 3rd film is completed (no release date yet though), with the centipede having over 500 "segments". http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1883367/


Thu Aug 21, 2014 3:56 pm
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