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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
5 Centimeters Per Second (2007)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0983213/
Animated masterpiece about first love, separation, unrequited love and estrangement. No, this one is not exactly an upper. The film is bar none the most impressive 2D animated film I have ever seen. The backdrops, particularly, I suspect were made by drawing over photos, and the result is simply stunning. I would go as far to say this is a must see for not only fans of Japanese animation, but lovers of fine animation in general. The drama isn't half bad either.
9/10.


I have one still from that film as my background at work and a second as my background at home. Beautiful and moving film.

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Mon Apr 28, 2014 5:50 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Vexer wrote:


Alrighty then:

The Sicilian
Under Fire
No Way Out
Dead Calm
Purple Hearts
Platoon
Born On The Fourth Of July
Don't Cry It's Only Thunder
Wise Guys
Cohen And Tate
The Hit
The Salamander
Prince Of The City
After Hours
Lucas
Mosquito Coast
Clean And Sober
Talk Radio



I will admit that I have not seen all of these. However, I agree with some of the ones I have seen. I think Born on the Fourth of July, Platoon and Talk Radio are terrific films, and that Oliver Stone in the 80s came about as close to capturing the auteur spirit of the previous decade. After Hours, Prince of the City, and The Mosquito Coast are all fantastic. They also rank among their respective directors' most underrated work, especially Prince of the City. I think it is overshadowed by the equally terrific The Verdict, not to mention many of Lumet's other great films - Serpico, Network, Dog Day Afternoon, etc.

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Mon Apr 28, 2014 5:54 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
NotHughGrant wrote:
The 80s is the only decade i'd describe as an actual genre all of its own.

Music, we all know an 80s power ballad or electro beat

Movies, action-sci fi, cop buddy

Fashion, white pants on men, the mullet haircut.

To varying degrees any decade spawns its own -isms.

But the 80s were extra strength expressive


Nicely said

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Mon Apr 28, 2014 7:22 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
An entire decade, crammed into one hairstyle:

Image

Also, I am convinced Jon Hamm has never looked younger than 35 since the day he was born.

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Mon Apr 28, 2014 9:02 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Gwaihir wrote:
Thief12 wrote:
Interesting discussion. And although I agree to a certain extent with what Ken said about nostalgia being a given for every generation, and how the "80's kids are the new leaders", I do think that the 80's have left a stronger aesthetic fingerprint in society in general than other decades, like well, the 90's. I think that, for better or worse, whether to praise them or criticize them, most people remember films like the one you all have mentioned than a lot of films that came during the 90's. Similarly, for better or worse, to praise or criticize, I think most people remember bands like Bon Jovi, Def Leppard, Stryper, Van Halen, Metallica, Journey, Poison, Motley Crue, etc. for their music, impact, and influence during the 80's, than they do 90's bands like Soul Asylum, Soundgarden, Smashing Pumpkins, Alice in Chains, Stone Temple Pilots, etc. The 80's were a decade of establishment for fashion, music, films, and television, whereas the 90's were more of a fight against those establishments or those trends, which in turn ends up leaving less "media memories". At least that's how I see it.


Funny you didn't mention Nirvana. Though not really, since it doesn't support your point. The still active acts like Nine Inch Nails and Pearl Jam still have impact and are remembered, too. Let's not forget hip hop, which utterly exploded in the 90's: Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Eminem, Notorious B.I.G., Wu Tang Clan, Missy Elliott, Mary J. Blige, etc. are still influential and active in the music scene. I love 90's music myself (not STP though, they were mere copycats of better bands IMO) but you're right that the 80's generally had a more distinct style. For instance, you always can tell an 80's movie or TV show by the level of synth on the soundtrack. So glad that trend died. Though again, gangsta rap I always associate with the 90's.

And personally, I don't remember Stryper FWIW. Def Leppard, Motley Crue, and Poison more as punchlines to be honest, though the other 80's bands you mentioned are good examples (though Van Halen I came out in the late '70s). U2 and R.E.M. I'd have put up there as well.


I could've mentioned Nirvana and still make my point regardless. Same with NIN and Pearl Jam. Perhaps I should've phrased it better as I went on my post, but remember I was talking more about an aesthetic and stylistic mark, more than actual artistic or musical influence. Like I said, 90's bands like Nirvana and the others I mentioned fought against those establishments in fashion and style. And I really didn't brought up rap or hip-hop because I'm not that familiar with that genre.

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Mon Apr 28, 2014 9:50 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
AJR wrote:
Vexer wrote:
I can tell you that Revelations is not really a sequel to the 2006 film as none of the characters return and I don't believe there was any mention of the events that occured.


Sean Bean, Deborah Kara Unger and Radha Mitchell were in the first movie and are playing the same characters.


Yeah I was wondering about that. I haven't seen Relevations but even the trailer indicates that it's a continuation.


Mon Apr 28, 2014 10:11 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Requiem for a Dream

It was spectacular, but wow, this was quite an uneasy watch (if you've seen the movie, I'm sure you'd know which scenes in particular I'm talking about). I've hardly seen any Darren Aronofsky films myself (this and Black Swan are the only ones I've seen so far), but I see him as a rather interesting one to look into right now. I can't even leave this movie feeling happy in the end...


Mon Apr 28, 2014 10:46 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Thief12 wrote:
Gwaihir wrote:
Thief12 wrote:
Interesting discussion. And although I agree to a certain extent with what Ken said about nostalgia being a given for every generation, and how the "80's kids are the new leaders", I do think that the 80's have left a stronger aesthetic fingerprint in society in general than other decades, like well, the 90's. I think that, for better or worse, whether to praise them or criticize them, most people remember films like the one you all have mentioned than a lot of films that came during the 90's. Similarly, for better or worse, to praise or criticize, I think most people remember bands like Bon Jovi, Def Leppard, Stryper, Van Halen, Metallica, Journey, Poison, Motley Crue, etc. for their music, impact, and influence during the 80's, than they do 90's bands like Soul Asylum, Soundgarden, Smashing Pumpkins, Alice in Chains, Stone Temple Pilots, etc. The 80's were a decade of establishment for fashion, music, films, and television, whereas the 90's were more of a fight against those establishments or those trends, which in turn ends up leaving less "media memories". At least that's how I see it.


Funny you didn't mention Nirvana. Though not really, since it doesn't support your point. The still active acts like Nine Inch Nails and Pearl Jam still have impact and are remembered, too. Let's not forget hip hop, which utterly exploded in the 90's: Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Eminem, Notorious B.I.G., Wu Tang Clan, Missy Elliott, Mary J. Blige, etc. are still influential and active in the music scene. I love 90's music myself (not STP though, they were mere copycats of better bands IMO) but you're right that the 80's generally had a more distinct style. For instance, you always can tell an 80's movie or TV show by the level of synth on the soundtrack. So glad that trend died. Though again, gangsta rap I always associate with the 90's.

And personally, I don't remember Stryper FWIW. Def Leppard, Motley Crue, and Poison more as punchlines to be honest, though the other 80's bands you mentioned are good examples (though Van Halen I came out in the late '70s). U2 and R.E.M. I'd have put up there as well.


I could've mentioned Nirvana and still make my point regardless. Same with NIN and Pearl Jam. Perhaps I should've phrased it better as I went on my post, but remember I was talking more about an aesthetic and stylistic mark, more than actual artistic or musical influence. Like I said, 90's bands like Nirvana and the others I mentioned fought against those establishments in fashion and style. And I really didn't brought up rap or hip-hop because I'm not that familiar with that genre.

It's ironic that the bands that fought against said establishments were being managed by major record labels(or as TVTropes calls it "The Man Is Sticking It To The Man"), and Nirvana were actually quite annoyed that their flannel look became a fashion trend, as that was not their intention, they only wore flannel because that was the warmest thing they could find.


Tue Apr 29, 2014 1:58 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
People should also remember that any incipient musical movement (and its accompanying incipient fashion trend) is necessarily rebelling against what came before it. Those '80s groups with teased hair and day-glo spandex outfits were, at one time, a breath of fresh air after a long stretch of freeze-dried progressive rock and disaffected punk. Frivolity in music was just what the doctor ordered. When people had enough of frivolity, along comes the flannel brigade to let us all know that music can still piss off your parents.

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Tue Apr 29, 2014 2:04 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
FilmFanJaimeR wrote:
Requiem for a Dream

It was spectacular, but wow, this was quite an uneasy watch (if you've seen the movie, I'm sure you'd know which scenes in particular I'm talking about). I've hardly seen any Darren Aronofsky films myself (this and Black Swan are the only ones I've seen so far), but I see him as a rather interesting one to look into right now. I can't even leave this movie feeling happy in the end...


I didn't care for this movie. All the visual trickery distanced me from the characters, and while it was certainly creative, it was too much.

The Warriors: 2/4. A visually dazzling action movie that is hampered by the fact that there is so little plot and character. I loved the staging of each scene, but I couldn't care less whether or not any of the characters lived or died. The only actors worth mentioning were Deborah Van Valkenburgh and David Patrick Kelly. Van Valkenburgh was great as the spunky Mercy and Kelly managed to chill as Luther when the opportunity arose. I guess the focus on visuals at the expense of everything else isn't a new thing.

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Tue Apr 29, 2014 2:29 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Ken wrote:
People should also remember that any incipient musical movement (and its accompanying incipient fashion trend) is necessarily rebelling against what came before it. Those '80s groups with teased hair and day-glo spandex outfits were, at one time, a breath of fresh air after a long stretch of freeze-dried progressive rock and disaffected punk. Frivolity in music was just what the doctor ordered. When people had enough of frivolity, along comes the flannel brigade to let us all know that music can still piss off your parents.


It is. I guess what made the 80s different was -

1. That rebellion was extreme

2. The numbers involved.

I've seen photos of my Dad, and my Uncles etc from the era, it's shocking and extreme.

The success of the 80s in co-opting everyone to 'the cause' finally hit home when I saw a photograph of an old work colleague. Now this guy was an ex-military tough bastard that you'd cross the street to avoid if you didn't know him, yet back in 86 he was a mullet sporting, white linen clad Wham fan. When I dared 'challenge' him on this, his response was 'you cheeky little fucker, that's just what EVERYONE did'.

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Tue Apr 29, 2014 3:47 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Solomon Kane - *** out of ****

Better than I was expecting. I was expecting it to be cheesy but it only gets cheesy during the climax, when the title character finally his face off with the main bad guy, and some kind of giant creature from hell. Other than that though, the special effects are, for the most part, excellent. James Purafoy, who is so good as Joe Carroll on Fox's The Following, is equally excellent as the titled tortured hero. And the supporting cast, which includes the likes of Max Von Sydow and the late great Pete Postlewait, are largely very good as well. It's a great looking movie too. The cinematography and production design are excellent. The movie moves at a great pace, and I was never bored, always entertained. Definitely worth a solid 3 stars. This movie is yet another reason not to write off movies that go direct dvd. They are not all bad.


Tue Apr 29, 2014 3:47 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Wake in Fright (1971)

The direction and cinematography are the most outstanding aspects of the film, managing to be atmospheric and evocative without coming off as showy. And what a nightmarish and sweaty atmosphere. The story of an educated schoolteacher descending into depravity after stranded in the outback is visceral and morbidly fascinating. However, after a certain point, a sense of inevitability begins to settle in, rendering the middle part a bit repetitive (although never boring). Maybe it's because John Grant is used as the audience's surrogate, but never register as a full individual in his own right, so I am not that emotionally involved in his plight. We feel for the experiences he have gone through, but not much for how it is affecting him as a person. It makes for an almost clinical exercise: thought-provoking but not as thoroughly shakening as it could have been. 7.5/10

Stalker (1979)

For all I've heard about the Slow Cinema of Tarkovsky, my first foray into his films is a pleasant surprise against my trepidation. First, it has an air of mystery and quite a fair bit of menace, which make the proceeding reasonably engaging. Second, at least in the slowness, people talk frequently. Sure, some of it goes into the inane territory that makes my mind check out a couple of times, but how the setting affects their minds so strongly that they sprout out philosophical musings and anguishes is fascinating. Apart from that, I have a hard time getting a clear grasp on the film, really. The precision in camera movement, color, and atmosphere is masterful and compulsively watchable enough, but most of it is more of a feeling than a film to me. For all the talking, my overall impression of the film is that of silence: the three people contemplating their next moves, measuring their words, moving carefully through the possibly hostile Zone, and wondering about their lives before and after this. It's all very philosophical, sometimes ploddingly so, but mostly in the best sense of that word for me. 8/10


Tue Apr 29, 2014 4:04 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
NotHughGrant wrote:
The 80s is the only decade i'd describe as an actual genre all of its own.

Music, we all know an 80s power ballad or electro beat

Movies, action-sci fi, cop buddy

Fashion, white pants on men, the mullet haircut.

To varying degrees any decade spawns its own -isms.

But the 80s were extra strength expressive


Nicely said


Nicely complimented! :)

No, really, I agree with you point above. 80s nostalgia was basically in-built into the decade itself. I remember the local pub advertising 80s karaoke nights as early as 1993/4.

Don't get me wrong, there are isolated appeals to 90s-specific nostalgia. But they are isolated. For instance, dredging up Britpop or the early 90s rave culture. But these are niche as opposed to mainstream phenomena.

A good test is this - Grand Theft Auto, which is a grotesque but still funny lampooning of cultural decadence*, saw fit to tribute a game devoted to the era - fertile ground as it is.


* I love how GTA V describes Los Santos as a sprawling landscape of self-help gurus and failed celebrities, as if these are worse than mass-murders and gangbangers

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Tue Apr 29, 2014 4:12 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
Unke wrote:
Modern blockbuster cinema (programming, marketing, merchandising), with which the 80ies are often associated, started much with movies such as 'The Exorcist', 'Jaws' and 'Star Wars'.


But that's precisely the issue! You just named three great to nearly great movies. It was the 80s that decided that big blockbusters had to be puerile, with Top Gun setting the mold. Jaws vs. Top Gun...that's my argument in a nutshell


I named those three movies to illustrate my point that some of the cinematic trends, which rightly or wrongly are often perceived to be equivalent to a commercialisation of cinema, didn't start in the 1980ies but the 1970ies. I didn't mean to comment on the quality of these movies, particularly not in comparison to the blockbusters of the 1980ies.

As I tried to write before, I believe that it isn't constructive to simply compare any odd movie of the 1970ies to any random movie of the 1980ies. I'm not sure if there is a sound way to make such comparisons. Perhaps you could categorise movies according to genre and than draw comparison between movies of the same genre. I guess that the 70ies would be on top in some categories and the 80ies in others. (From the top of my head, I can't remember a great Hollywood comedy made in the 70ies, but a number of brilliant 80ies comedies such as 'Airplane', 'Trading Places', 'Planes, Trais and Automobiles' or 'The Naked Gun'. I don't know any good Westerns made in the 1980ies, though, in contrast to a number of excellent Westerns of the 1970ies, such as 'The Oulaw Josey Wales' or 'Little Big Man'.) Of course, you would have to find way to minimise personal preferences and bias to some extent as well.

I think your comment illustrates my problem with the methodology very well: Why are you comparing a critically acclaimed monster movie to a critically reviled romance? That's arbitrary. I might just as well counter your point by writing: "'Smokey and the Bandit' vs. 'Platoon' - that's my argument in a nutshell."


Tue Apr 29, 2014 8:41 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I don't think James is simply cherry picking certain films from the 70s and cheesier films from the 80s to make a point; I think (and I'm sure he'll correct me if I'm wrong) he is saying that the 80s produced a certain genre of movies that are now best known as '80s films'.

And if these words I put into his mouth are true, then I agree with him.

I remember Tarantino once explaining his thinking behind the scripts of Reservoir Dogs and/or Pulp Fiction. His point was that 80s films were scripted in such a way that almost literally everything said on screen was a tool to advance the plot in a linear like fashion.

If you combine this kind of narrative with flashy suits; terrible haircuts; paper-thin plots based on cocktails of comradery & revenge. Ferraris, white suits, did I mention bad haircuts? Moustaches. Muscle men, women with curly hair. Police bosses who don't appreciate their renegade but talented staff. Rebels who get results. Quick dialogue. Smart ass, but apparently charming, off the cuff remarks. Drinking coffee. Pin stripe suits. Men who look like women. Plots that more resemble platform games than actual stories. Robots who look like humans but still act like robots. Tight jeans, tight white t-shirts. Leather worn in non-ironic fashion. Power ballad soundtracks.

Ya know ... the 80s!

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Tue Apr 29, 2014 9:19 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
NotHughGrant wrote:
I don't think James is simply cherry picking certain films from the 70s and cheesier films from the 80s to make a point; I think (and I'm sure he'll correct me if I'm wrong) he is saying that the 80s produced a certain genre of movies that are now best known as '80s films'.

And if these words I put into his mouth are true, then I agree with him.

I remember Tarantino once explaining his thinking behind the scripts of Reservoir Dogs and/or Pulp Fiction. His point was that 80s films were scripted in such a way that almost literally everything said on screen was a tool to advance the plot in a linear like fashion.

If you combine this kind of narrative with flashy suits; terrible haircuts; paper-thin plots based on cocktails of comradery & revenge. Ferraris, white suits, did I mention bad haircuts? Moustaches. Muscle men, women with curly hair. Police bosses who don't appreciate their renegade but talented staff. Rebels who get results. Quick dialogue. Smart ass, but apparently charming, off the cuff remarks. Drinking coffee. Pin stripe suits. Men who look like women. Plots that more resemble platform games than actual stories. Robots who look like humans but still act like robots. Tight jeans, tight white t-shirts. Leather worn in non-ironic fashion. Power ballad soundtracks.

Ya know ... the 80s!


Well, if the argument is that the greatest movies of the 1970ies are vastly superior to bad movies made in the 1980ies, I agree wholeheartedly, although it isn't a very interesting point to make.

Your (amusing) definition of a typical 1980ies movie is interesting, because you are already using criteria concerning the quality of the movie as a frame of reference: "paper-thin plots based on cocktails of comradery and revenge", "plots that more resemble platform games rather than actual stories". This reads as if you're saying that a movie with a good plot telling an interesting story isn't a typical 1980ies movie. I think that this is methodically unsound, if you intend to compare the quality of the movie of the 70ies to those of the 80ies.

I don't think that there is such a thing as a typical 80ies movie - or a typical 70ies movie for that matter. This isn't to say that there aren't trends which can be associated with these decades or topics often addressed by movies of a certain decade. Arguably, there was a glut of conspiracy thrillers in the 1970ies because of Watergate just as much as 80ies movies like 'Scarface' or 'Wall Street' are about the American Dream being perverted into rampant egotism and a 'win at all costs' mentality. That doesn't say anything about the quality of the movies, though. To illustrate my point: In the early 70ies, there was a brief fad which is often referred to as "porn chic" today and which took movies such as 'Deep Throat', 'Behind the Green Door' and 'The Devil in Miss Jones' to the top of the box office. This is certainly indicative of the sexual politics and perhaps permissiveness of the time and, insofar, arguably typical of the (early) 1970ies. Now, I haven't seen any of these three movies, but even if they were any good, which I severely doubt, I wouldn't say that they were representative of 70ies cinema as a whole.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Unke wrote:
NotHughGrant wrote:
I don't think James is simply cherry picking certain films from the 70s and cheesier films from the 80s to make a point; I think (and I'm sure he'll correct me if I'm wrong) he is saying that the 80s produced a certain genre of movies that are now best known as '80s films'.

And if these words I put into his mouth are true, then I agree with him.

I remember Tarantino once explaining his thinking behind the scripts of Reservoir Dogs and/or Pulp Fiction. His point was that 80s films were scripted in such a way that almost literally everything said on screen was a tool to advance the plot in a linear like fashion.

If you combine this kind of narrative with flashy suits; terrible haircuts; paper-thin plots based on cocktails of comradery & revenge. Ferraris, white suits, did I mention bad haircuts? Moustaches. Muscle men, women with curly hair. Police bosses who don't appreciate their renegade but talented staff. Rebels who get results. Quick dialogue. Smart ass, but apparently charming, off the cuff remarks. Drinking coffee. Pin stripe suits. Men who look like women. Plots that more resemble platform games than actual stories. Robots who look like humans but still act like robots. Tight jeans, tight white t-shirts. Leather worn in non-ironic fashion. Power ballad soundtracks.

Ya know ... the 80s!


Well, if the argument is that the greatest movies of the 1970ies are vastly superior to bad movies made in the 1980ies, I agree wholeheartedly, although it isn't a very interesting point to make.

Your (amusing) definition of a typical 1980ies movie is interesting, because you are already using criteria concerning the quality of the movie as a frame of reference: "paper-thin plots based on cocktails of comradery and revenge", "plots that more resemble platform games rather than actual stories". This reads as if you're saying that a movie with a good plot telling an interesting story isn't a typical 1980ies movie. I think that this is methodically unsound, if you intend to compare the quality of the movie of the 70ies to those of the 80ies.


I kind of am, yeah. For instance, if I were to say "RomCom" to you, wouldn't you make some kind of value judgement? Some genres do quite accurately and somewhat instantaneously tell us at least something about the quality. For instance, any argument about Lethal Weapon is usually based on how it measures up against 48 hours, not how it measures up against The Godfather.

That isn't to say that the 80s didn't produce some great films, just that the great ones it did produce aren't first and foremost thought of as 80s films, per se. When I think of an 80s film, I think Tango & Cash and Turner and Hooch long before Raging Bull or Once Upon a Time in America.

Quote:
I don't think that there is such a thing as a typical 80ies movie - or a typical 70ies movie for that matter. This isn't to say that there aren't trends which can be associated with these decades or topics often addressed by movies of a certain decade. Arguably, there was a glut of conspiracy thrillers in the 1970ies because of Watergate just as much as 80ies movies like 'Scarface' or 'Wall Street' are about the American Dream being perverted into rampant egotism and a 'win at all costs' mentality. That doesn't say anything about the quality of the movies, though. To illustrate my point: In the early 70ies, there was a brief fad which is often referred to as "porn chic" today and which took movies such as 'Deep Throat', 'Behind the Green Door' and 'The Devil in Miss Jones' to the top of the box office. This is certainly indicative of the sexual politics and perhaps permissiveness of the time and, insofar, arguably typical of the (early) 1970ies. Now, I haven't seen any of these three movies, but even if they were any good, which I severely doubt, I wouldn't say that they were representative of 70ies cinema as a whole


Like I say, I wouldn't dismiss any decade in a single broad stroke, but popular 80s movies are definitely a genre onto themselves, for my money anyway.

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Tue Apr 29, 2014 10:41 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Quote:
His point was that 80s films were scripted in such a way that almost literally everything said on screen was a tool to advance the plot in a linear like fashion.


Well this isn't a genre, just good filmmaking, not exclusive to the 80s. As for the other attributes, sure, but the 90s could be their own genre as well almost. High concept, deliberately artificial sets. Demolition Man is a 90s movie. Saving Private Ryan just happened to come out in the 90s. I understand the distinction you're making, and I do think it's important to a certain extent.

On that other point, I think Jaws being the founder of all blockbusters is a bit flimsy. Weren't there plenty of blockbusters before that? Sure, maybe Jaws started the emphasis on the Summer Season. But if it can be said that there is a certain blockbuster spirit, then blockbusters existed as long as movies have. As have event movies, more broadly. They were under their share of attack even in the 50s, but the 80s is when they really started going downhill. Ambition started to be replaced by easy money.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
NotHughGrant wrote:
Unke wrote:
...Well, if the argument is that the greatest movies of the 1970ies are vastly superior to bad movies made in the 1980ies, I agree wholeheartedly, although it isn't a very interesting point to make.

Your (amusing) definition of a typical 1980ies movie is interesting, because you are already using criteria concerning the quality of the movie as a frame of reference: "paper-thin plots based on cocktails of comradery and revenge", "plots that more resemble platform games rather than actual stories". This reads as if you're saying that a movie with a good plot telling an interesting story isn't a typical 1980ies movie. I think that this is methodically unsound, if you intend to compare the quality of the movie of the 70ies to those of the 80ies.


I kind of am, yeah. For instance, if I were to say "RomCom" to you, wouldn't you make some kind of value judgement? Some genres do quite accurately and somewhat instantaneously tell us at least something about the quality. For instance, any argument about Lethal Weapon is usually based on how it measures up against 48 hours, not how it measures up against The Godfather.

That isn't to say that the 80s didn't produce some great films, just that the great ones it did produce aren't first and foremost thought of as 80s films, per se. When I think of an 80s film, I think Tango & Cash and Turner and Hooch long before Raging Bull or Once Upon a Time in America.

Quote:
I don't think that there is such a thing as a typical 80ies movie - or a typical 70ies movie for that matter. ...


Like I say, I wouldn't dismiss any decade in a single broad stroke, but popular 80s movies are definitely a genre onto themselves, for my money anyway.


Ah, this seems to be where we differ: I don't regard the period, in which a movie has been made, as a genre or even style. Certainly, there are genres, which have been particularly popular in certain decades, like the above-mentioned conspiracy thrillers, which were popular in the 1970ies and 2000s. And of course there have been styles (for a lack of a better word), which happened in certain decades or are intrinsically conected t them, like Film Noir in the 1940ies and 1950ies o the French New Wave in the late 1950ies/1960ies.

But the date of a film's release isn't a style or genre.

Irrespectively of that, why wouldn't you think of 'Once upon a time in America' as a 1980ies movie, when you are thinking about movies, which have been released in a certain decade? Because, you know, it has been released in the 1980ies just as much as 'Dirty Dancing'.


Tue Apr 29, 2014 11:43 am
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