Discussion of movies and ReelThoughts topics

It is currently Sat Nov 01, 2014 5:08 am




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16411 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 749, 750, 751, 752, 753, 754, 755 ... 821  Next
Last Movie You Watched 
Author Message
Assistant Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2012 9:35 pm
Posts: 818
Location: Puerto Rico
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Well, sometimes you're in the mood for steak, sometimes you just want a hamburger. For some reason, I was in the mood for some dumb horror film, so I watched Wrong Turn, and it sorta fit the bill. Sure, it wasn't excellent, but it wasn't downright awful; just mediocre. The kills aren't that creative, most of the cast is pretty bad, the direction isn't that good either, but there are a few moments of tension that work quite well. All in all, probably a C

_________________
"Get busy living, or get busy dying"

Visit my site: Thief12 profile


Sat Apr 19, 2014 8:46 pm
Profile WWW
Auteur
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 12:02 pm
Posts: 3769
Location: Zion, IL
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Thief12 wrote:
Well, sometimes you're in the mood for steak, sometimes you just want a hamburger. For some reason, I was in the mood for some dumb horror film, so I watched Wrong Turn, and it sorta fit the bill. Sure, it wasn't excellent, but it wasn't downright awful; just mediocre. The kills aren't that creative, most of the cast is pretty bad, the direction isn't that good either, but there are a few moments of tension that work quite well. All in all, probably a C

I thought it was a pretty tense and well-done horror film myself, the cast was mostly good, though the characters did occasionally do some stupid things(though you be hard-pressed to find a horror film without that sort of thing)

I'd recommend you check out the sequels if you can.


Sat Apr 19, 2014 9:24 pm
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 6:26 pm
Posts: 2157
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
NotHughGrant wrote:
Thief12 wrote:
Glengarry Glen Ross Now, this is a film I hadn't seen in almost 20 years. I remember liking it a lot, but watching it today, man, what a bunch of excellent performances. Obviously, being based on a play, the strength is indeed in the performances, and they all excel in it. Particularly Jack Lemmon, who I think was magnificent. Pacino might've had the showiest role, but Lemmon was so perfect. And the rest of the cast is no worse. Pretty darn good film. Grade: A-


I agree with all of that. Lemmon was the best of a very good bunch

Baldwin's cameo is excellent, and yet I loathe it for giving people the impression that imitating his speech gives them amazing motivational powers.

_________________
The temptation is to like what you should like--not what you do like... another temptation is to come up with an interesting reason for liking it that may not actually be the reason you like it.


Sat Apr 19, 2014 9:44 pm
Profile
Cinematographer
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 8:21 pm
Posts: 627
Location: Milwaukee, WI (USA)
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Jodorowsky's Dune (2013)

It is 1974 and Chilean director Alejandro Jodorowsky, having recently delivered head-scratchers El Topo and The Holy Mountain, has decided on what his next project will be: an adaptation of Frank Herbert's novel, Dune. This movie, he contends, will change the cinematic world and will be a transcendent experience for the audience. Never mind that when he comes to this decision, Jodorowsky has never actually read Dune.

Jodorowsky's Dune is a documentary 40 years later about what has been called "the greatest science fiction movie never made." At 84 years old, Jodorowsky is still enthusiastic, sharp and full of dreams. He spends much of this movie explaining how in 1974 he started collecting artists and actors who would fit his vision. Plans are made, a screenplay is written and intricate storyboards are constructed. Principal actors have agreed to be a part of it. A truly strange collection ranging from David Carradine to Orson Welles to Gloria Swanson to Salvador Dali to Mick Jagger to Jodorowky's own 12-year old son (who had also appeared in El Topo). Music would be provided by Pink Floyd and Magma. Along the way Jodorowsky recruits visionary artists to design sets, ships, characters and costumes. Some, like Dan O'Bannon, have some movie production experience. Others, like H.R. Giger and Jean (Moebius) Giraud had never worked on a movie before, but would put their creative stamps on future projects well known to movie goers down the line.

Of course Jodorowsky's version of Dune never got made. A version would eventually come out in 1984 by director David Lynch. The story behind Jodorowsky's vision is very interesting, and Jodorowsky himself is very funny and engaging, if not a little bit on the crazy side. A lot of this doc is straight up interviews, with some graphic animations inspired by the detailed storyboards to give an idea of what the final product might look like.

Had Jodorowsky's attempt at Dune never been made, movies like Alien, Blade Runner and Total Recall may have never been made, or at the very least, would have certainly had different looks to them. However, had Jadorowsky succeeded in fulfilling his dream, a movie like Star Wars might never have been made. As visionary as Jodorowsky was, I don't know that he would have been able to deliver something commercially viable. And a $15 million flop in 1974 may have given studios pause before trying another Sci-Fi epic in 1977. 3.0 / 4.0


Sat Apr 19, 2014 10:41 pm
Profile
Assistant Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2012 9:35 pm
Posts: 818
Location: Puerto Rico
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Vexer wrote:
Thief12 wrote:
Well, sometimes you're in the mood for steak, sometimes you just want a hamburger. For some reason, I was in the mood for some dumb horror film, so I watched Wrong Turn, and it sorta fit the bill. Sure, it wasn't excellent, but it wasn't downright awful; just mediocre. The kills aren't that creative, most of the cast is pretty bad, the direction isn't that good either, but there are a few moments of tension that work quite well. All in all, probably a C

I thought it was a pretty tense and well-done horror film myself, the cast was mostly good, though the characters did occasionally do some stupid things(though you be hard-pressed to find a horror film without that sort of thing)

I'd recommend you check out the sequels if you can.


Jeremy Sisto, and maybe Eliza Dushku, were the only ones that weren't cringe-inducing. The lead dude and Emmanuelle Chriqui were pretty bad. But acting is not the main issue with the film. It's too mediocre, too by-the-numbers. The film has nothing original to offer. But well, to each his own. At least I wasn't appalled by it.

_________________
"Get busy living, or get busy dying"

Visit my site: Thief12 profile


Sat Apr 19, 2014 11:17 pm
Profile WWW
Auteur
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 12:02 pm
Posts: 3769
Location: Zion, IL
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Thief12 wrote:
Vexer wrote:
Thief12 wrote:
Well, sometimes you're in the mood for steak, sometimes you just want a hamburger. For some reason, I was in the mood for some dumb horror film, so I watched Wrong Turn, and it sorta fit the bill. Sure, it wasn't excellent, but it wasn't downright awful; just mediocre. The kills aren't that creative, most of the cast is pretty bad, the direction isn't that good either, but there are a few moments of tension that work quite well. All in all, probably a C

I thought it was a pretty tense and well-done horror film myself, the cast was mostly good, though the characters did occasionally do some stupid things(though you be hard-pressed to find a horror film without that sort of thing)

I'd recommend you check out the sequels if you can.


Jeremy Sisto, and maybe Eliza Dushku, were the only ones that weren't cringe-inducing. The lead dude and Emmanuelle Chriqui were pretty bad. But acting is not the main issue with the film. It's too mediocre, too by-the-numbers. The film has nothing original to offer. But well, to each his own. At least I wasn't appalled by it.

I thought Chrique was pretty good and I don't remember the lead guy being outright bad.

I don't really mind that it wasn't original, that's pretty much agiven with these types of films, as long as a film done well, I can live with the lack of originality


Sun Apr 20, 2014 1:37 am
Profile
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jun 20, 2010 4:04 pm
Posts: 1752
Location: New Hampshire
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Big Gus, What's The Fuss?

I have expressed a great admiration for the films of Lloyd Kaufman before. Big Gus is one of his earliest films, and I had only known it by reputation. Kaufman has called it "the worst film I've ever made, maybe the worst film ever," and has said "it did more damage to the Jews than Hitler did with Mein Kampf." So I was curious...was it really as bad as Lloyd says it is?

The answer is no. Big Gus is not the worst film ever made, not by a long shot. It is a rough, dated, poorly paced film, and I think that has a lot to do with the way it was produced. Big Gus was shot in Israel with a primarily Israeli cast and crew that could only speak Hebrew. Kaufman and his producer were the only ones who could speak English, and their translator was a guy on the crew who barely understood English. Kaufman has said that making Big Gus was the worst experience of his career, that no one knew what they were doing from one minute to the next, money, equipment and script problems were constant, and Israeli distribution fell through due to the Yom Kippur War. Kaufman ended up owing money to practically everyone involved with the film. I think that this has a lot to do with Kaufman's hatred of the film.

And the plot? Well, it's about a bumbling Jewish detective who bumbles a lot. Big Gus is loosely plotted, but it does showcase how Kaufman was still drawing on his influences at this phase of his career - mainly the exaggerated physical comedy of Chaplin, Keaton, the Marx Brothers and W.C. Fields. It's a bad film, but it is not the outright disaster its creator has claimed it to be.

_________________
Death is pretty final
I'm collecting vinyl
I'm gonna DJ at the end of the world.


Sun Apr 20, 2014 10:21 pm
Profile
Cinematographer

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 8:09 pm
Posts: 724
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mark III wrote:
Short Term 12 is an average movie centered around the support staff at a foster facility for wayward kids. If you're well-versed in the cliche of support group revelations, you can basically write the entirety of the movie and hit most of the highlights that get covered. Though the material is possibly more tastefully (and realistically) handled than in something like It's Kind of a Funny Story, this isn't any better. If anything, with the obligatory acoustic music cues and factory installed heaviness, Short Term 12 is a step below: it's psychological finger painting for an older audience. The bookend scenes, both featuring a humorous story with a dramatic finish, wreck some of the credibility. The last story, featuring one of the movie's more tragic characters, is particularly hackneyed. This is another one that got some positive notices here and there. This, to me, illustrates what a lousy movie year 2013 must have been. Short Term 12 is just another Indie Darling little blip, a wimpy One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest for audiences that need their emotional cues as unsubtle and shouted as possible. The indie ship, how she keeps on sinkin'.


I've quoted Mark's close to two week old post because A) I watched this movie today, and B) a quick forum search revealed his thoughts were closest to my own. I liked the movie a bit better than him, but the overwhelming praise the film received, both on this forum (Pedro and Shade loved it, amongst others) and in the critical community, is puzzling. Like Mark, I had issues with the...let's call it indie-ness, of the film. It just felt like the filmmakers thought striving for technical realism, and realizing the term "underprivileged kids" is offensive, gave them free license to run the gamut of support group stereotypes. It isn't that this isn't a worthy story to tell, just that it's told so obviously.

The best thing the movie does is to show how creative endeavors can act as a form of catharsis and an outlet in situations where there may not be any real world avenues for any of that (I liked the contrast of the opening and closing stories told by the employees as a way to reinforce this). Unfortunately, all of that ends up taking a back seat to the cliche-ridden plot. It's a shame, as that aspect was subtly shown and, with a little more fleshing out, could have allowed the movie as a whole to rise above the worn material.


Mon Apr 21, 2014 11:39 pm
Profile
Second Unit Director

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 1:45 pm
Posts: 438
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Nights of Cabiria (1957)
Although ‘Nights of Cabiria‘ is often grouped with Federico Fellini’s best or at least most famous movies, it falls short of the quality of ‘La Strada’, ‘8 ½’, ‘La Dolce Vita’ or ‘Amarcord, in my opinion. The movie is about a prostitute in postwar Rome, who lives in abject poverty, but has an indomitable optimism that she will find her true love, who would save her from daily humiliation at the hands of pimps, johns and other streetwalkers. The film follows her through a number of nights and consist of thematically linked episodes, not unlike in ‘La Dolce Vita’, to which ‘Nights of Cabiria’ has been compared by some critics. My problem with this film is that I didn’t quite buy the character played by Fellini’s wife Giulietta Masina, who is very good and nearly manages to sell the impossible character of Cabiria/Maria. It is less of a problem that is never quite clear whether Cabiria/Maria is putting on an act of naivety to cope with her situation or whether she’s a bit on the slow side and genuinely hopes for salvation, but it is a problem that she is never convincing as a streetwalking prostitute. Her “job” seems to consist of finding temporary lovers and being kept by them rather than being a sex worker, which isn’t quite how I imagine life as an alley cat to be like. Overall, I liked the film but didn’t think that it was quite good enough. 6/10

Massacre Time (1966)
This Spaghetti Western is mostly notable for having been directed by Lucio Fulci, who is primarily known for his horror movies, and for featuring Franco Nero, which had the consequence of his character being renamed “Django” in the German release to cash in on the success of the more famous contemporary Italo Western. Nero plays Tom, a prospector who receives a letter from his brother asking him to return home as soon as possible. When Jim arrives at his brother’s ranch, he finds it taken over by a Mr. Scott, who rules his hometown, and Mr. Scott’s sadistic son, whereas Tom’s brother is now an alcoholic outsider living in a shack somewhere. The rest of the plot progresses as you would expect it to. ‘Massacre Time’ is a typical Spaghetti Western and, if that’s you kind of thing, you shoudln’t be disappointed. Despite of its quite extreme violence and some interesting camerawork and direction, I wasn’t completely won over by this movie, though. Perhaps I just wasn’t in the mood. Perhaps the plotting and characterisations are just too generic to make an impression. An above-average movie, but not a good one. 6/10


Tue Apr 22, 2014 4:02 am
Profile
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 10:42 pm
Posts: 1432
Location: Bangkok
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)

After a string of middling-to-awful entries in his first stretch of sound era films (save for his first one, Blackmail), Hitchcock finally backs away from those dramas and delivers a solid suspense film that plays to his strengths. It is concise at 76 minutes, maybe a little too much so in the beginning, which makes the set-up a little sloppy. Once the premise is established and the main couple is embroiled fully in the assassination plan, the film really breezes along with many fun set pieces. Three standouts for me are an almost-cringey dentist struggle, the opera sequence that builds suspense masterfully through just faces and musical set-ups, and the surprisingly violent and chaotic shoot-out at the end. In his second film I've watched, after M, Peter Lorre excels again as the memorable villain, exuding twisted disdain and charm in equal measure. 7.5/10

The 39 Steps (1935)

Maybe my expectation was too high, but I didn't love the first highly acclaimed Hitchcock film. It is still very good though. A little stiff in presentation and transitions, maybe, but I was engaged by the wonderful, smart characters and the story's twists and turns. Its combination of proto-North by Northwest's thriller fun and It Happened One Night's rom-com charm are also very appealing. 8/10


Tue Apr 22, 2014 9:06 am
Profile
Assistant Director
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2012 5:43 pm
Posts: 773
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
And then there's the unfocused and poorly acted Scanners, David Cronenberg's haphazard vision of telekinesis run amok. Cameron Vale (poor man's David Emge lookalike Stephen Lack) plays a vagrant roped into puppetry by the evil ConSec corporation so he may put a stop to rogue empath Darryl Revok (poor man's Jack Nicholson/John Malkovich looksortalike Michael Ironside). Along the way, Vale meets Kim Obrist (poor woman's Anne Bancroft lookalike Jennifer O'Neill) and there is much infiltration, 'scanning' the minds of other people and antiquated computers, a brief battle to stop Revok from creating a military might with his theoretical army of scanners.

Cronenberg's inspiration for the screenplay is rooted in thalidomide horror, corporate distrust, and a burning desire to use special effects in a novel way. We all fondly recall the image of a man's head exploding. A man's eyes burst like little grapes, too. All themes are very loosely touched upon so as to not get in the way of the marginal storytelling, a decision that makes Scanners just another mediocre movie with an inexplicable cult. There are some good ideas that get a passing mention: drug companies inadvertently creating psychic youths by supplying expectant mothers with anti-anxiety meds that have extraordinary side effects, Moore's law, and the growing threat of New Age thinking. The paint must have been thin during the weeks this movie was painted as no theme is ever given more than a quick mention and, with all of the bad acting and poorly-written characters, Scanners is a waste of time.

What saves it from complete badness is a d-grade charm made possible when one looks back at 1980 from the glorious golden age that is 2014. In a way, Cronenberg was ahead of his time and this is genuinely unfortunate: had this same movie been made last year, not changing a single frame, it would have been more meaningful as it commented on the divide between generations and the challenges of meaningful human interaction in a world lorded over by drug companies and technology. Cronenberg isn't getting any points for foresight, not from me. Scanners is assembled cheese, almost quaint in its fears while predicting fears that aren't quaint in the least. As far as experiences go, it's often bad and too unfocused to even half-heartedly recommend for midnight viewing.

_________________
Which are you drinking? The water or the wave?


Tue Apr 22, 2014 3:05 pm
Profile
Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jun 20, 2010 4:04 pm
Posts: 1752
Location: New Hampshire
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Domino

I'm only posting this because there's an element of this film that really pisses me off. Let's leave aside the story (which is mostly B.S. despite being based on a true story), I want to focus on the camerawork. Director Tony Scott cannot...hold...the camera...still...for one...fucking...second. I swear, this movie gave me ADD, which is a shame because the story has potential, but is yet another action film undone by shitty directing.

_________________
Death is pretty final
I'm collecting vinyl
I'm gonna DJ at the end of the world.


Tue Apr 22, 2014 10:23 pm
Profile
Auteur
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 12:02 pm
Posts: 3769
Location: Zion, IL
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Sexual Chocolate wrote:
Domino

I'm only posting this because there's an element of this film that really pisses me off. Let's leave aside the story (which is mostly B.S. despite being based on a true story), I want to focus on the camerawork. Director Tony Scott cannot...hold...the camera...still...for one...fucking...second. I swear, this movie gave me ADD, which is a shame because the story has potential, but is yet another action film undone by shitty directing.

I thought the directing was pretty decent myself, certainly nowhere as bad as say Bourne Supremacy in that department.

I think Domino is a criminally underrated film and one of Scott's finest efforts.


Tue Apr 22, 2014 11:18 pm
Profile
Cinematographer
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2012 2:41 pm
Posts: 662
Location: The Desert
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The past month has been an eventual one for me. Going permanent at the company I work for, and all the extra responsibilities that shift in status brings with it, has sapped most of my energy for both seeing films and writing about films. The fact that I spend my days writing professional documents hasn't helped matters either; by the end of the day, my brain is tired and I've become accustomed to shutting it all down quite quickly in the evening. So I've fallen behind on what I intended to do throughout the year: write something about every first-time film viewing. It's something I still want to do, but the days where I would devote 300-400 words to a single film on a consistent basis might be a thing of the past, at least for the moment. Instead, here are just a handful of sentences on some of the films I've seen (I'll catch up with the rest in a couple more posts later on):

Short Term 12 - I probably fall somewhere in the middle in terms of forum opinion on this film. Not as indifferent to it as Mark, but not head-over-heels rapturous for it either. The film teeters on the edge of descending into indie quirk hell, but the strong performances all around, especially from Brie Larson and John Gallagher Jr., keep even the more heavy-handed moments from becoming too awkward. I probably had this as an 8/10 when I first saw it, but a couple months removed from the film it feels more like a 7/10.

A Man Escaped - When it comes to cinematic thrillers, I've always been of the mind that the smallest actions can create just as much, if not more, suspense as the largest ones. Robert Bresson's 1956 prison escape drama might be the textbook example of this idea, a stripped-down masterwork that generates its tension through the most miniscule and deliberate processes. The film says right at the outset that the following events are presented "without adornment," and it isn't kidding; the closest the film has to adornment is the repeated use of Mozart's heavenly "Great Mass in C minor," a musical selection that emphasizes the subtle redemptive theme running throughout (the prisoner's escape plan has him gradually moving skyward in the prison before descending back down to earth during his escape). Yeah, it's one of those films I have no problem calling a masterpiece. 10/10.

The LEGO Movie - I've been known to whine and moan about certain types of animated films that frequently clog up multiplexes. You probably know which ones I'm talking about, the ones that rely on stale pop culture references and celebrity voices, the ones that serve as diversions to kids and provide nothing lasting. Well, here is a film that breaks the mold, offering a smart mashup of pop culture and gleefully irreverent humor, while proving just how lazy so many other animated films are nowadays. Nothing about this film screams lack of effort, and that's incredibly refreshing when it so easily could have settled for much less. 8/10.

Zatoichi's Vengeance - Most of the elements that make up the thirteenth film in the Zatoichi series are pretty standard order. Once again, the blind swordsman finds himself in a town in trouble, with people that need saving, and other people that need killing. The film plays as a workmanlike entry for most of its running time (with only a swordfight sequence shot entirely in silhouette standing out), and then it decides it wants to end on a darker beat than expected. I think this is the first Zatoichi film I've seen where the hero leaves behind a situation not demonstrably better than it was when he first arrived, so it's got that going for it. 6/10.

Mad Detective - Before this film, I've been impressed with what I've seen from filmmaker Johnnie To. But this 2007 effort is quite a bit of style and not much of anything else. Somewhere in L.A., Donald Kaufmann is pitching an English language remake of this goofy story of a "mad detective" who can see the true personalities of his suspects, and who ends up chasing down someone with seven warring personalities. Most of the film revolves around the zany actions of the title character, which is unfortunate as he starts to grate almost immediately (he solves an opening crime by jamming himself in a small suitcase and falling down a flight of stairs, and a couple scenes later he's presenting his self-severed earlobe as a present to his retiring section chief). To does his best to give a spark to this story (he's probably the 237th director to rip-off the hall of mirrors finale from The Lady Of Shanghai), but he's never able to disguise the fact that the material he's working with is, and I'm being charitable here, quite stupid. 3/10.

The Wind Rises - Hayao Miyazaki belongs on the list of the all-time greatest filmmakers, but if this is indeed to be his swan song, he's not going out with his best effort. It's a biopic that mostly eschews the vibrant fantasies of his past work and replaces them with mostly dull reality. The central figure of Jiro Horikoshi isn't interesting; you don't learn much about him other than he loves aviation and he has a strong determination to succeed. Ok, he does fall in love too, but all that development leads to is a lot of weepy melodrama. Because the thrust of the story is more overtly Japanese-oriented than anything else Miyazaki has done, there's a chance that the film could play better in its original language than it does with the English voiceover. But I'm not sure if I'd be willing to give it another try. I hesitated to call the film a letdown in a post I made on here when I first saw it, but now I think I'm ready to admit it. The film is a letdown. 5/10.

_________________
"The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool."
Letterboxd Profile


Tue Apr 22, 2014 11:35 pm
Profile WWW
Second Unit Director
User avatar

Joined: Sun Nov 04, 2012 6:18 pm
Posts: 221
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Last Temptation of Christ - It being Easter weekend and all, I thought it appropriate to get this one out (on VHS, too!). Great movie. Of all the movies that portray Jesus Christ in the gospels, it is the only one that I feel effectively nails the humanity of Christ. And it is the only one bold enough to take creative chances with its storytelling instead of pandering to the Christian audience. I love it. **** out of ****


Wed Apr 23, 2014 12:27 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2539
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I rewatched a firm favourite of mine, Slapshot, and although I offered a review on it a couple of years ago, i'd just like to add how much I like the film for how it incorporates so seamlessly the chaos of the lives of the characters with the action and violence in the arena.

Something really interests me about this film, beyond beating people with hockey sticks I mean. I can't recall a sports film as good at relating the subject matter to real-world considerations. Actually, I can. Another one I liked is Any Given Sunday, but where Any Given Sunday relates the personal failures of the characters to their participation in the arena - Slapshot relates the collective and community failures to it.

The crowd (and, indeed, the team) are the waste products of a dying industrial town, beaten to its knees by emerging globalisation (yes it existed in the 70s) and left to rot in the middle of nowhere. It's the kind of environment that touches home somewhat with me. A place where belligerency is prized above consideration. And not for nothing, because it's a cold and hostile world that can even bring the girlfriend of a Harvard alumina to her knees.

Slapshot is about violence in ice hockey. A sport I respect and enjoy and yet simultaneously recognise as an often paper thin excuse for said violence. But as with many a film, the minute-to-minute subject matter is a vehicle to convey a message about something else. This time, the wasted lives in the outliers; in the places chopped up and sold off down the river. A town's once proud reputation would have, in the past, manifested itself through skill and respect for the rules of engagement, but emptied of dignity it is instead a vehicle for misery and frustration. Pick any football (soccer) team to visit in England, you can bet your bollocks that if you go to a location savaged by the new economic revolution, you'll be spending your time dodging flying glass.

I'm speculating on Slapshot's message a little here. Because these themes seem to arise almost incidentally. There is no specific (that is to say 'spoonfed') narrative that confirms all than I'm saying. To many a folk, the film is the thinly disguised excuse for violence the sport itself often is. And the film itself is quite messy, and somewhat overlong. Or perhaps I'm just conditioned to think that way because today's movies (especially orgiastic, overcoming the odds sports fodder) take such precautions to spoonfeed the viewer stage by stage. - hell hath no fury like a confused or alienated, lowest common-denominator cinema-goer!

Slapshot is bloody good film. Not perfect, but all the more better for it. And Newman really ties it all together in what is for me one of his best roles.

If ritualised violence expressed as a result of greater economic forces with a lot of beer and an insistence on hearing Maxine Nightingale sounds like it's for you, then watch this movie at once.

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Wed Apr 23, 2014 4:34 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2539
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mark III wrote:
And then there's the unfocused and poorly acted Scanners, David Cronenberg's haphazard vision of telekinesis run amok. Cameron Vale (poor man's David Emge lookalike Stephen Lack) plays a vagrant roped into puppetry by the evil ConSec corporation so he may put a stop to rogue empath Darryl Revok (poor man's Jack Nicholson/John Malkovich looksortalike Michael Ironside). Along the way, Vale meets Kim Obrist (poor woman's Anne Bancroft lookalike Jennifer O'Neill) and there is much infiltration, 'scanning' the minds of other people and antiquated computers, a brief battle to stop Revok from creating a military might with his theoretical army of scanners.

Cronenberg's inspiration for the screenplay is rooted in thalidomide horror, corporate distrust, and a burning desire to use special effects in a novel way. We all fondly recall the image of a man's head exploding. A man's eyes burst like little grapes, too. All themes are very loosely touched upon so as to not get in the way of the marginal storytelling, a decision that makes Scanners just another mediocre movie with an inexplicable cult. There are some good ideas that get a passing mention: drug companies inadvertently creating psychic youths by supplying expectant mothers with anti-anxiety meds that have extraordinary side effects, Moore's law, and the growing threat of New Age thinking. The paint must have been thin during the weeks this movie was painted as no theme is ever given more than a quick mention and, with all of the bad acting and poorly-written characters, Scanners is a waste of time.

What saves it from complete badness is a d-grade charm made possible when one looks back at 1980 from the glorious golden age that is 2014. In a way, Cronenberg was ahead of his time and this is genuinely unfortunate: had this same movie been made last year, not changing a single frame, it would have been more meaningful as it commented on the divide between generations and the challenges of meaningful human interaction in a world lorded over by drug companies and technology. Cronenberg isn't getting any points for foresight, not from me. Scanners is assembled cheese, almost quaint in its fears while predicting fears that aren't quaint in the least. As far as experiences go, it's often bad and too unfocused to even half-heartedly recommend for midnight viewing.


Good write-up!

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Wed Apr 23, 2014 5:15 am
Profile
Director

Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2012 7:44 pm
Posts: 1819
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Idiocracy

Pretty funny little film. Not entirely unbelievable either. Not sure we have to wait 500 years :? . It's interesting to compare it to Demolition Man. In the Stallone film, the future society has been "pussyfied." Stallone is the only macho man left. In Idiocracy, it's the exact opposite. Homophobia is at an all time high and every male is a wannabe macho slob. In Judge's vision, any sign of intelligence is gay. Funny thing is, the same is basically true in Demolition Man except the perspectives are switched. The macho slob is the underdog instead of the oppressor. Somehow I find myself chuckling at both premises, though Demolition Man is better made and a bit sharper. But the Stallone film also has little to do with intelligence. It doesn't portray an effeminate society as being stupid. Just dishonest. I think Judge's vision is a little one-sided. If society is being dumbed down, I'm not convinced rednecks are responsible for it. Still, pretty funny. Especially the movie Ass.


Wed Apr 23, 2014 7:47 am
Profile
Producer
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 9:04 am
Posts: 2539
Location: Lancashire, England.
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I don't think Judge is saying rednecks are responsible for it. He's saying that the fixed and blissfully ignorant way of life they allegedly live will be the only one that manages to successfully pro-create.

I like Idiocracy .. .and Demolition Man for that matter. In their own way they are both right, in a similar way to the fact Orwell and Huxley were both right in a limited fashion.

_________________
... because I'm a wild animal


Wed Apr 23, 2014 8:15 am
Profile
Second Unit Director

Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 1:45 pm
Posts: 438
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mark III wrote:
And then there's the unfocused and poorly acted Scanners, David Cronenberg's haphazard vision of telekinesis run amok. Cameron Vale (poor man's David Emge lookalike Stephen Lack) plays a vagrant roped into puppetry by the evil ConSec corporation so he may put a stop to rogue empath Darryl Revok (poor man's Jack Nicholson/John Malkovich looksortalike Michael Ironside). Along the way, Vale meets Kim Obrist (poor woman's Anne Bancroft lookalike Jennifer O'Neill) and there is much infiltration, 'scanning' the minds of other people and antiquated computers, a brief battle to stop Revok from creating a military might with his theoretical army of scanners.

Cronenberg's inspiration for the screenplay is rooted in thalidomide horror, corporate distrust, and a burning desire to use special effects in a novel way. We all fondly recall the image of a man's head exploding. A man's eyes burst like little grapes, too. All themes are very loosely touched upon so as to not get in the way of the marginal storytelling, a decision that makes Scanners just another mediocre movie with an inexplicable cult. There are some good ideas that get a passing mention: drug companies inadvertently creating psychic youths by supplying expectant mothers with anti-anxiety meds that have extraordinary side effects, Moore's law, and the growing threat of New Age thinking. The paint must have been thin during the weeks this movie was painted as no theme is ever given more than a quick mention and, with all of the bad acting and poorly-written characters, Scanners is a waste of time.

What saves it from complete badness is a d-grade charm made possible when one looks back at 1980 from the glorious golden age that is 2014. In a way, Cronenberg was ahead of his time and this is genuinely unfortunate: had this same movie been made last year, not changing a single frame, it would have been more meaningful as it commented on the divide between generations and the challenges of meaningful human interaction in a world lorded over by drug companies and technology. Cronenberg isn't getting any points for foresight, not from me. Scanners is assembled cheese, almost quaint in its fears while predicting fears that aren't quaint in the least. As far as experiences go, it's often bad and too unfocused to even half-heartedly recommend for midnight viewing.


I don't understand the cult appeal of 'Scanners' either and suspect that it has something to do with the relatively small amount of science-fiction movies of this sort compared to today's Hollywood genre output. Your remark about the themes of 'Scanners' being more relevant today got me thinking: Wouldn't this be good material for a remake? Sure, 'Scanners' is flawed, to put it mildly, but I think the substance for a good movie is there.

Sexual Chocolate wrote:
Domino

I'm only posting this because there's an element of this film that really pisses me off. Let's leave aside the story (which is mostly B.S. despite being based on a true story), I want to focus on the camerawork. Director Tony Scott cannot...hold...the camera...still...for one...fucking...second. I swear, this movie gave me ADD, which is a shame because the story has potential, but is yet another action film undone by shitty directing.


I agree wholeheartedly, although I'd blame the failure of this movie equally on the terrible plot, terrible acting and awful camerawork.

NotHughGrant wrote:
Slapshot
If ritualised violence expressed as a result of greater economic forces with a lot of beer and an insistence on hearing Maxine Nightingale sounds like it's for you, then watch this movie at once.


Violence, a lot of beer and Maxine Nightingale? Sounds like a winner to me. (although I'll now have to deal with the fact that I won't get 'Right back where we started from' out of my head for he rest of today.)


Wed Apr 23, 2014 8:31 am
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16411 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 749, 750, 751, 752, 753, 754, 755 ... 821  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forum/DivisionCore.
Translated by Xaphos © 2007, 2008, 2009 phpBB.fr