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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Arron wrote:
The last film I watched was Rise of the Planet of the Apes. Whilst I thought it was actually visually poor, I loved the rising against oppression story and gave me similar spine-tingling feeling to that of when the people walk through the army barracades in V for Vendetta. I have no idea why James Franco signed up for this film as he was completely wasted. I really did enjoy it, though. I've never rooted for an ape so much in my life.

I look forward to the next installment, which I think is due out in a year or two.


This summer in fact

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Tue Mar 04, 2014 10:48 am
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Captain Phillips - I think I’ve always liked the idea of a Paul Greengrass film more than final result that always ends up onscreen. The veteran filmmaker has made a career of tackling touchy sociopolitical subject matter through relatively mainstream fare; take a look at Green Zone or his contributions to the Bourne series and you’ll find visceral films that aren’t afraid to mix in some commentary with their action. That blending is exactly what I like to see from directors who make their name primarily through genre pictures, but Greengrass’ filmmaking instincts hardly ever feel to me to be up to the task. His last handful of films have found him operating in action-thriller mode, with the larger emphasis on action, a mode of moviemaking with which he’s never seemed entirely comfortable. There were enough appealing ideas in those films, but they felt like showcases for his weaknesses as a filmmaker rather than his strengths. Which brings us to his latest film, a story that seems better-tailored to bring out Greengrass’ best.

A couple qualities elevate Captain Phillips a step above Greengrass’ more inconsistent past work. The first is that this is predominantly a thriller, not an action film. It’s a small distinction to make, but an important one; Greengrass’ handheld, up-close-and-personal aesthetic is better suited for scenes of quiet tension than scenes of aggressive bombast. The second is that the film is anchored by two strong performances from Tom Hanks and Barkhad Abdi. Most films would emphasize the big star over the newcomer, but Greengrass gives equal weight to both of these people, emphasizing that there really are no villains in this situation, just people brought together by the opportunities given to them. The evenhandedness is appreciated, but it also exposes some flaws in the other characterizations, particularly in the supporting pirate roles. One of them is a young kid who seems there only to spark sympathy, while another is a loose cannon, there to add extra tension and unpredictability to the film’s final third. The need to rely on these kinds of character shortcuts holds back Captain Phillips from becoming something great. I think though with this film Greengrass has finally found something approaching a comfort zone, and I would expect his efforts in the future to hew close to this one while continuing to show increased confidence in other areas. 7/10.

Zatoichi’s Revenge - The tenth film in the Zatoichi series. When I wrote down my thoughts on the film that came right before this one, Adventures Of Zatoichi, I remarked on a trend the series was exhibiting, where the best entries were immediately followed up with the least remarkable entries. Well, now I’m starting to notice another, more positive trend: the series is good at bouncing back into good graces. It happened with Zatoichi And The Chest Of Gold after Zatoichi On The Road, and now it’s happened again with Zatoichi’s Revenge. The film opens with the blind swordsman returning to the town where he was taught his significantly-less-deadly trade as a professional masseur. Upon his arrival, however, he learns that his old teacher has been murdered and the deceased’s daughter has been forced to move into the local brothel. The uneasy situation in the town does not sit right with Zatoichi, and so he sets out to rescue the girl from her new surroundings and uncover the details behind his teacher’s sudden death. It goes without saying that he leaves a trail of bodies in his wake.

The biggest takeaway I had from watching Zatoichi’s Revenge is that the filmmakers had clearly got their hands on some Sergio Leone westerns. The Italian filmmaker’ s influence can be felt all throughout this film, from the more stylized framing and composition of scenes to the score from frequent series composer Akira Ifukube, which takes clear inspiration from Ennio Morricone in its use of Spanish guitar and harmonica on top of the more traditional musical palette. The similarities don’t stop there though: brief flashback sequences play out in sepia tone, and the fight sequences are given much more time to breathe, a shift away from the efficient bloodletting of past entries (the highlight here is a lengthy tracking shot of the blind swordsman walking through town and striking down everyone who unwisely comes into his path). Much like Zatoichi And The Chest Of Gold, Zatoichi’s Revenge is lacking in the emotional element that has driven the best films in the series. But if you’re just in the mood for a stylish and entertaining adventure, this would be a more than suitable selection. 7/10.

The Spectacular Now - It takes a decent while before the feeling of déjà vu disappears from James Ponsoldt’s 2013 coming-of-age drama. You’re introduced at the beginning to the hero of the story, popular high-school goofball Sutter, and you can’t help but see a little Lloyd Dobler in him, albeit in a slightly more obnoxious form. You watch as Sutter stumbles his way into the good graces of the pretty but introverted bookworm Aimee, and now you’re really starting to wonder. “Hold up for a minute, isn’t this Say Anything…? I’m not sure how much more patience I’m going to grant this.” That The Spectacular Now is able to eventually distance itself from that monolith and achieve its own thing, and achieve it well, is one of the great reliefs from the last year of film.

Ponsoldt’s film really breaks from Cameron Crowe’s ’80s teen classic in its handling of the central romance. Unlike in Say Anything…, where there was never much of a question of the intimate connection between John Cusack and Ione Skye, the pairing in this film never feels like a match made in heaven. It isn’t even clear if the two of them are entirely good influences on each other (she starts to follow his lead when it comes to excessive alcohol consumption). But even though the relationship is flawed and not likely to lead anywhere, they help each other recognize parts of themselves they never knew existed before. The fact that Sutter and Aimee are not soul mates helps the film transition smoothly into its final third, which places increasingly less emphasis on the romance and more on Sutter’s personal awakening. The film is really his story; he’s the one we follow throughout the entire drama, watching his progression from goofball slacker/burgeoning alcoholic (like Simon Pegg’s Gary King in The World’s End, this is the kind of guy who will always look back on his high school years as his best years) to someone with more awareness of himself and his potential. It’s not the smoothest road: a car accident seems thrown in to jolt the viewer, so little impact does it have on the rest of the story, and scenes of Sutter struggling with grade problems feel superfluous when he successfully graduates only a handful of scenes later. But it is certainly one worth traveling. 8/10.

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Tue Mar 04, 2014 10:06 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mostly agreed on Captain Phillips, though since it was based on a true story the character didn't feel like "shortcuts" to me.


Tue Mar 04, 2014 10:27 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Bad Girl

This 1931 Borzage flick is hard to find, but worth seeking out. It's fairly static like a lot of early sound films, but Borzage drew me in and forced me to hope things would work out in the end. Amazing that it still retains that effect. The male and female lead performances are really earnest, despite the fact that neither one is great acting. The plot is mushy and soapy and some of it toward the end is just ridiculous, but the best scenes evoke stuff like the opening scene of Happiness. I get the same awkward-romance vibe from both. I like it. Borzage holds up as a good storyteller, even if his style isn't terribly distinctive.

Love Parade

Lubitsch's first sound film, I believe. It's made in 1929, and has some of the same clunky pacing we expect from all early sound movies. It's also way overlong. But Lubitsch is definitely a cut above the rest. It was made a couple years before Frankenstein and Little Caesar, but feels like it would have been made a few years later. Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald bring the energy, though there's a little too much singing in this one. It's not as vibrant as Merry Widow, but it's entertaining enough, and there are some good jokes spread throughout. I think I prefer Lubitsch's musicals to his non-musicals. Some of the latter are just too talky. I find that Shop Around the Corner in particular becomes utterly buried in dialogue, and stifled by it, though still a pretty decent movie.


Wed Mar 05, 2014 5:07 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
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Borzage holds up as a good storyteller, even if his style isn't terribly distinctive.


curious to see what you think of Strange Cargo


Wed Mar 05, 2014 1:41 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
About fifteen minutes into the Harold Lloyd vehicle High and Dizzy I said to myself "what the fuck are you doing?" I didn't want to be watching some goofy silent movie on a previous-generation telephone, neglecting stuff that I wanted to or possibly even should be doing. The experience wasn't edifying just like, a few nights back, the experience of watching the opening notes of The General wasn't edifying: it was a chore. I had the presence of mind to turn that off, tell myself I'd get back to it, but with the Harold Lloyd short -- 26 minutes, that's all -- I watched the remainder and considered the facts: I wasn't watching this to be entertained or enlightened, I was watching this because I felt it was my obligation to myself as a so-called movie fan and as a member of some forum where I could spit out nonsense on this movie, other movies that really didn't have much of an influence on my thinking and feeling.

If it had just been the short, I wouldn't be writing anything about the little nothing that is High and Dizzy. Whatever, it's fine. But it wasn't the short: I was put back in the same awkward place that I was in early high school, doing and reading and watching things because I wanted to be an adult or at least respected like an adult. Was that the only motivation for watching the short? For the silent movie thing elsewhere on the forum?! Why was I watching what I was watching?!??! :arrow: !!??!?? There is no comfortable answer.

Maybe, in part, I was looking to impress myself or, shamefully, impress others. I don't believe that's the whole picture, thank stars. But at the back of my mind is a little voice that says "you don't really care" when I put on The General or High and Dizzy or... . That voice is right: I don't really care. I never really cared. I will finish the silent movie thing because it may give me something beautiful or it could lead to an even more enlightening existential crisis. And I'll write about it because I feel obligated and you won't really care because you're like me: who gives a fuck about what some midwestern-bred jerk thinks about Harold Lloyd or Griffith? I'm not some film nut that has a deep need to appreciate the first movies ever made. I don't have it in me! I want to have it in me but it's just not there.

Anyway, High and Dizzy is really great if you're looking to have an existential moment in front of your telephone while at lunch.

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Wed Mar 05, 2014 5:48 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
It would probably work better if you could see what's going on, but maybe not: I'm sure I've seen that short and don't remember it, so maybe you'll forget it, too.

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Wed Mar 05, 2014 7:24 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mark III wrote:
I'm not some film nut that has a deep need to appreciate the first movies ever made. I don't have it in me! I want to have it in me but it's just not there.


I got off to a slow start myself. Going to re-watch the short Easy Street (The Chaplin Collection on Netflix Instant). Seeing the Tramp whup a big thug always puts me in a better mood to watch silents. You have me feeling doubtful about having The General in the queue now.


Wed Mar 05, 2014 7:56 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
CasualDad wrote:
Mark III wrote:
I'm not some film nut that has a deep need to appreciate the first movies ever made. I don't have it in me! I want to have it in me but it's just not there.


I got off to a slow start myself. Going to re-watch the short Easy Street (The Chaplin Collection on Netflix Instant). Seeing the Tramp whup a big thug always puts me in a better mood to watch silents. You have me feeling doubtful about having The General in the queue now.


For me, The General still has a decent amount of genuinely funny moments. But it also has some annoying aspects. Not my favorite Buster Keaton, but it's cool enough. I enjoy watching the ultra-old stuff, though some of it is hit and miss. I get a kick out of Intolerance and am genuinely engaged by Murnau and Fritz Lang. Eisenstein feels a little obligatory to me, as does Chaplin. Passion of Joan of Arc has often felt like an obligation, but I recently was able to finally watch it in HD and that's pretty cool. Some of the more star-driven silents with Valentino, Fairbanks, and Chaney were really fun the first time though I'm not sure I'd return to them again.


Wed Mar 05, 2014 9:20 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mark III wrote:
I'm not some film nut that has a deep need to appreciate the first movies ever made. I don't have it in me! I want to have it in me but it's just not there.

I'm in total agreement with that sentiment. Unless you're watching over about 150 movies a year, you probably won't even exhaust the quality releases (including international) from any given year - and every old timer you watch will result in one less viewing of something else just as good or better from any other period. I just don't see the point UNLESS the old timer can genuinely stand toe to toe with modern cinema, which for me is only very rarely the case. Some people have an affection for the really old classics, but it's totally absent from me.


Wed Mar 05, 2014 11:45 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
Mark III wrote:
I'm not some film nut that has a deep need to appreciate the first movies ever made. I don't have it in me! I want to have it in me but it's just not there.

I'm in total agreement with that sentiment. Unless you're watching over about 150 movies a year, you probably won't even exhaust the quality releases (including international) from any given year - and every old timer you watch will result in one less viewing of something else just as good or better from any other period. I just don't see the point UNLESS the old timer can genuinely stand toe to toe with modern cinema, which for me is only very rarely the case. Some people have an affection for the really old classics, but it's totally absent from me.


I like seeing a variety of different films from different times and places. An advantage that older films have is that a lot of the garbage has disappeared over the years, or has been marginalized so you have to seek to find it. I like Chaplin, Keaton and Lloyd, but there were many other comedians of the time who are mercifully forgotten.

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Thu Mar 06, 2014 12:08 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
A Single Shot (2013)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1540741/
John Moon (Sam Rockwell), while hunting in the woods for food, accidentally shoots and kills a young woman. After finding her "camp" and a boatload of money he decides to hide the body and keep the cash. The woman's lover finds out who was responsible and John's life turns to shit. That's basically the story, and one you've probably seen told in various ways countless times already. It is very atmospheric though, and well-acted. William H. Macy, who I haven't seen for a while, plays a seedy lawyer. It's ok for what it is.
7/10.

Trance (2013)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1924429/
Danny Boyle directs a fairly well-constructed psychological (literally!) crime thriller in which James McAvoy heists a painting (as an insider at an art auction), but suffers amnesia after being struck down during the escape and has no idea what he did with it. Needless to say, his cohorts are none too pleased and endeavor to 'jog his memory', first with torture and then with a hypnotherapist (inexplicably of his own choosing) played by Rosario Dawson. The twist seemed extremely obvious to me:
[Reveal] Spoiler:
The fact that he chose Rosario Dawson who then immediately wants a piece of the profits seemed totally unrealistic if she didn't already know what was going on from the get go. It was clear they had already met previously, and given that, extremely likely he had already been her patient...

Some people have compared this to Inception, but imo this isn't nearly as complex or satisfying as that.
7/10.


Thu Mar 06, 2014 3:14 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
Mark III wrote:
I'm not some film nut that has a deep need to appreciate the first movies ever made. I don't have it in me! I want to have it in me but it's just not there.

I'm in total agreement with that sentiment. Unless you're watching over about 150 movies a year, you probably won't even exhaust the quality releases (including international) from any given year - and every old timer you watch will result in one less viewing of something else just as good or better from any other period. I just don't see the point UNLESS the old timer can genuinely stand toe to toe with modern cinema, which for me is only very rarely the case. Some people have an affection for the really old classics, but it's totally absent from me.


Good movies that are made today still retain a strong connection to the best that were made back then. Many great pieces of storytelling and entertainment from those decades can still work now as much as they did back then. It's not just about historical interest. For me, Footlight Parade is as entertaining as any modern popcorn flick.

But you make it sound like modern cinema is better simply for being "modern." There's still plenty of bad movies made today, I'd say no more than 10-15 per year are really exceptional.


Thu Mar 06, 2014 4:35 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I guess it comes down to how much wading in any one sea a person, in this case me, is willing to go through. Contemporary movies are so much more superficially accessible to me. It unfortunately comes down to the most mundane elements like color, lighting, clothes, hair, acting, and sweet precious sound. It's the difference between me and a real film scholar: I can't always see it. Sometimes because I don't look close enough, sometimes because I'm just not as capable as the next man.

That is, I watch a silent movie and I tell myself "you need to watch and appreciate this", so disingenuous of me. I mean, that's the problem: it's almost disingenuous of me to opine on these movies -- it feels like I lack the rosetta stone. Of course there are great silent films that I could watch and enjoy, not always aware that i'm watching a silent film that i have to handle with kid gloves. The conditions just don't seem right: I may never be able to watch and see The General because I'll be watching and seeing nearly 100 years of love and adoration for The General. I'm learning that I haven't been entirely honest with myself on some of the classic great films.

Did I really like Smiles of a Summer Night or did I convince myself that I needed to like it? Am I just really, really tired?

Ken's signature is fucking with my mind. In short time it'll be revealed that I've been in a coma for the past 15 years, this is all a last dash of light from my dying mind.

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Thu Mar 06, 2014 5:00 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Thoughts on movies I saw in my Pedros/Oscars roundup:

Saving Mr. Banks (2013)

What could've been a pleasantly diverting crowd-pleaser turns out to be a wonderful look into the psyche of the creator of Mary Poppins. For the record, I have neither read the book nor see the film, but still consider this to be one of the best 2013 has to offer. As James said in his review, the reason for that being the case is absolutely terrific performances all-around, from every member of the cast, big and small, known and unknown. That is what elevates this film to a level it couldn't have attained otherwise.

Emma Thompson's realization of P.L.Travers' is a work of a genius. This is an acerbic character who could've been instantly unlikable for several reasons, but Thompson's portrayal provides tremendous depth to the character. Even before parts of her past are revealed, we know there's a lot more to her and why she doesn't want to hand over her story to Walt Disney, and that's solely due to Thompson's performance. Speaking of the latter, Tom Hanks' portrayal is said to be spot on from people who knew the real Walt. All I know is that it is another great performance in a film full of them. And of course, who could forget the genius of Paul Giamatti in a minor yet important role of Travers' limo-driver. The role is necessary to bring out Travers' humanity. Colin Farrell goes under-appreciated in the role of Travers' alcoholic father. I've always thought him to be one of the most underrated actors working in the industry right now.

But if this was just about the performances, it wouldn't have been as great. The storyline is frighteningly accurate. (The real recordings with Travers play over the end-credits, and I was surprised as to how acerbic she really was.) And it was easy for me to sympathize with Travers when she says she doesn't want to hand over her story. (I am not a writer, but even as a programmer, I feel sick to be handing over code I've written to someone else.) Surely one of the best films of 2013.

Her (2013)

A flat-out science-fiction masterpiece from Spike Jonze. Without a doubt, my favorite film from 2013. (I saw it twice in theaters as well.) I've made it no secret that I am really fascinated by modern technology. I am a geek at heart, and I want to see how the technology we're using evolves in the future, and how it makes our lives better. Jonze's science-fiction hints at that. What made Her a great film to get attached to was the knowledge that some of the things shown in the film could become reality in my lifetime. (Maybe not sentient operating systems, but the rest of it will most certainly happen by the time I die.)

To me, the worst thing a director can do is judge his own characters, and take sides in a debate. (I made a similar point about why I instantly fell in love with Blue is the Warmest Color.) In all the greatest films, the director gives us his characters and story, and asks us to make our own mind up. (A Separation for example.) It could've been easy for Jonze to take a psychological look at Theodore's love with his operating system. But even though it is hinted by his wife that he always wanted a relationship without all the difficulties, that is not something Jonze does. He observes this beautiful relationship without making huge, sweeping statements. And that made it easier for me to sympathize with Theodore and to accept this unconventional relationship.

Joauqin Phoenix may never win an Academy Award, but that doesn't take away from the reality that he is one of the few geniuses working in the industry right now. His work in this film once again attests to that. He makes Theodore just socially awkward enough that we can accept that he is lonely at this point in his life, but not that awkward that it alienates him from the viewers as a weirdo. That is a very, very fine line for an actor, but Phoenix straddles it perfectly. And what about Scarlett Johansson. I had her nominated as Best Actress for the Pedros, but she got in through the best supporting category. It is impossible for voice actors to lend depth to characters even when they're animated, but to do so for a character who is only a voice is downright otherwordly. But that is exactly what Johnasson has done in this film. The moment her voice comes up, we accept her as a character with her own thinking and ideas, and that is solely due to Johansson's ability. (Of course, it is unfair on others because she has the voice of angels. I could listen to it all day without getting bored, and if I ever have a sentient OS, I want it to be voiced by her.)

I've not seen Adaptation yet. (Sorry Mark.) But this could be the pinnacle of Jonze's career. An outstanding film that can be endlessly rewatched as well. Just WOW!

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Thu Mar 06, 2014 5:39 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
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I guess it comes down to how much wading in any one sea a person, in this case me, is willing to go through. Contemporary movies are so much more superficially accessible to me. It unfortunately comes down to the most mundane elements like color, lighting, clothes, hair, acting, and sweet precious sound. It's the difference between me and a real film scholar: I can't always see it. Sometimes because I don't look close enough, sometimes because I'm just not as capable as the next man.

That is, I watch a silent movie and I tell myself "you need to watch and appreciate this", so disingenuous of me. I mean, that's the problem: it's almost disingenuous of me to opine on these movies -- it feels like I lack the rosetta stone. Of course there are great silent films that I could watch and enjoy, not always aware that i'm watching a silent film that i have to handle with kid gloves. The conditions just don't seem right: I may never be able to watch and see The General because I'll be watching and seeing nearly 100 years of love and adoration for The General. I'm learning that I haven't been entirely honest with myself on some of the classic great films.

Did I really like Smiles of a Summer Night or did I convince myself that I needed to like it? Am I just really, really tired?

Ken's signature is fucking with my mind. In short time it'll be revealed that I've been in a coma for the past 15 years, this is all a last dash of light from my dying mind.


Too what extent must one contort oneself to like a movie out of one's typical remit?

Good question. All I can say is, 15 years ago, it would be unthinkable for me to like some of the films I do now, and part of me hopes I can say the same in another 15 years.

But the process must be organic. I would never delve into silent movies yet, because I'm just not at that stage.

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Thu Mar 06, 2014 5:39 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
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I may never be able to watch and see The General because I'll be watching and seeing nearly 100 years of love and adoration for The General.


Ah, but this is a different issue, one I empathize with completely. Personally, I have trouble with Chaplin perhaps because he is like Mickey Mouse. Everyone knows him, even people who don't know movies. I have more fun with Keaton because watching him feels more like a discovery. Some films simply aren't textured or layered enough to discover anything new about them. Movies like King Kong, Frankenstein, Wizard of Oz may be all used up at this point. Does Citizen Kane have any surprises left anymore? Barely, which is why I find Lady from Shanghai and Touch of Evil to be more interesting.

But as to the other point, I think all the movies I like are guilty pleasures to some extent, including even The Godfather, for instance. Film has always been about being a guilty pleasure simply in the sense that it's supposed to be a genuine pleasure. So it's true, no movie should feel just like an obligation or appreciation. I watch movies because I enjoy what they look and feel like, and there are certain kinds of stories I enjoy going along with more than others. So that applies to old movies as much as new. In The General, I enjoy the scenery and the spectacle of the gags. And Footlight Parade, I genuinely enjoy some of the musical sequences and find the whole thing to be really funny and fun. And things like Duck Soup and Scarlet Empress are still great, because they're just funny.

Bluray helps with some of them. I get a huge kick out of seeing a 1927 movie in such high definition. Makes it seem fresh and immediate. To be honest, I don't even see some of these movies as old really, because their bluray releases are still brand new. I'm one of those who believe that bluray is the genuine answer to making older movies seem fresh. If I ever feel jaded by these older flicks, it's usually because the quality of the version I'm watching needs to be better. That includes newer movies as well like Munich, which still is not on bluray for some reason. But just as some movies become outdated, I think the opposite can happen, where a film looks better now than it did at the time of release.


Thu Mar 06, 2014 6:10 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mark III wrote:
About fifteen minutes into the Harold Lloyd vehicle High and Dizzy I said to myself "what the fuck are you doing?" I didn't want to be watching some goofy silent movie on a previous-generation telephone,


For me, watching ANYTHING on a phone (apart from various YouTube clips) would turn any movie into a shitty experience.


Thu Mar 06, 2014 8:23 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
MunichMan wrote:
Mark III wrote:
About fifteen minutes into the Harold Lloyd vehicle High and Dizzy I said to myself "what the fuck are you doing?" I didn't want to be watching some goofy silent movie on a previous-generation telephone,


For me, watching ANYTHING on a phone (apart from various YouTube clips) would turn any movie into a shitty experience.


No doubt. It's a serious compromise of the movie, no matter the movie. I was more referring to the thought process that lead me to watch High and Dizzy, not the means by which I watched it.

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Thu Mar 06, 2014 4:55 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Homefront (2013)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2312718/
Sylvestor Stallone pens a script (that he had originally planned for himself decades ago) in which Jason Statham gets to punch, shoot, and blow shit up. So to summarise, if you like movies in which Jason Statham gets to punch, shoot, and blow shit up you will almost certainly like Homefront.
6/10.


Thu Mar 06, 2014 5:27 pm
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