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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Gwaihir wrote:
Thief12 wrote:
Gwaihir wrote:
Pacific Rim - Guillermo del Toro's visually spectacular homage to Godzilla, Neon Genesis Evangelion, etc. (fill in the blank with your favorite Japanese monster movie/anime) that unfortunately is unevenly acted and meanders a bit. The two Charlies are the weak links. Day is hilarious, but definitely not a strong actor, and his subplot feels like padding. Yes, Ron Perlman's cameo is delightfully quirky in that uniquely del Toro way, but it's not necessary. Not to mention that Day's role doesn't really suit his unique talents. Hunnam looks the part perfectly but doesn't really add much to make his character memorable (though the better actors bring out some good stuff from him, so I guess he plays off other actors well), and was an unfortunate choice to narrate the prologue. His voice is just too bland. If they had to have one of the characters narrate it, they should have gone with Idris Elba, who's easily the highlight. He's a force of nature, and commands attention. Rinko Kikuchi doesn't astonish the way she did in her breakthrough role in Babel (curiously enough, directed by another Mexican) but she brings strength and vulnerability to her role, and solidifies her status as an actor to watch. Rob Kazinsky was fine, but I mention him primarily for the odd connection he shares with del Toro: both left The Hobbit (he was initially cast as Fili), and then made Pacific Rim. Coincidence?

Of course the reason to watch this is the action scenes, and they absolutely do not disappoint. The visual effects are astounding (WTF Oscars?), and they get the blood pumping as you'd expect. The Hong Kong battle, with the violence offset by the glitzy city lights, is spectacular. I was indifferent to the ending, which seemed rather cliche (the very end I mean) and had one too many uses of the noble sacrifice trope. The first instance was far more affecting IMO. Not the masterpiece one might have hoped for, but a very good action movie overall. 7.5/10


Ugh, I think I spent most of the film rolling my eyes at the awful dialogue and performances :roll: I gave it a C, and I think it is at the bottom of my 2013 list.

EDIT: Almost at the bottom. Higher than Mama, but probably tied with Oblivion.


That's a very fair critique, and I'll admit that my partiality to it was probably largely due to my enjoyment of its inspirations, like the aforementioned Neon Genesis Evangelion. Outside of Elba and Kikuchi, the performances weren't particularly good.


I thought Max Martini gives a good performance too and Charlie Hunman was perfectly fine. My biggest problem with Pacific Rim is that the action scenes are just incoherently directed and edited as the action in the Transformers movies. Guillerma Del Toro directs the scenes with too many close ups. Plus, it's really annoying that most of the fight scenes take place at night in the rain or in/under water. It makes hard to see what's going on. The movie also contains some cool ideas (such as the idea of the two people in the machines having mind meld) but doesn't do anything with them. Also the idea of finding a way to beat the aliens by the two guys mind melding with the aliens is also a very cool idea. But again, it's merely just a plot device. The movie wasn't terrible, but it was very disappointing.


Thu Feb 13, 2014 12:36 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Agreed, I personally found Pacific Rim to be inferior to the Transformers films, by comparison those films had much more variety in terms of action, with PR all the action scenes kinda blended together, they were still decent, but nothing there approached the level of the final battle in Chicago in Dark Of The Moon.


Thu Feb 13, 2014 12:41 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Taking place at night or rain is indeed annoying and too obvious of being a budgetary concern, but incoherently directed and edited as Transformers? I liked the first film but its climax is a metallic blur. Whereas del Toro's camera stays way more still and establishes the fight more clearly. I may admit having enjoyed Pacific Rim a lot more than usual partly from its appealing Japanese manga spirit.

RoboCop (2014)

The biting comedic zing of the original is gone, but its social commentary is modernized in an interesting way, especially in a great pre-credit sequence. That disappointingly gets tossed aside as the film goes along. The third act in particular feels like there's studio interference all over it. It's sleek, exciting, and entertaining enough with good direction and performances, but the promise shown at the beginning that it might be able to achieve more than this makes it somewhat disappointing. 6.5/10

Synecdoche, New York (2008)

Kaufman unfiltered, which is unexpectedly a bad thing. It feels akin to being in the presence of his alter ego in Adaptation for two hours, with obvious visual cues and a whole lot of navel gazing. It does tie itself together with some real poignancy towards the last act, and whatever Kaufman is aiming for, Phillip Seymour Hoffman is completely in synch with him. The actor delivers a great surrogate performance that elevates the film considerably. His news in the last few weeks adds resonance and emotional wallop to the film's last scenes, making the ending all kind of crushing. 5.5/10


Thu Feb 13, 2014 12:44 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I really loved Synecdoche, New York when I first saw it because I, to be honest, was so bewildered by so much of it that I was able to foist meaning on it, give it a sweaty middlebrow interpretation that made the movie part movie, part personal autobiography of Me: The Guy Who Had Nothing To Do With The Movie. I haven't seen it in several years but I've since become more honest with myself and wonder if I'd disregard the movie. My lack of love and undying admiration for Holy Motors indicated to me that times were changing for this guy. It was a very freeing realization.

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Thu Feb 13, 2014 1:49 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Red Balloon

Watched as a family and it's pretty great. I was going to come in here with a long post about how the balloon symbolizes Judaism and kind of wing it from there but I don't have the heart to knock this delightful short film. There are two lines of spoken dialogue and the rest is a tour of small neighborhood in Paris lead by a boy, his balloon. I remembered, as I watched, how the end of the film scared me when I first saw it. The director later went on to invent the board game Risk. Hmmm. Thought I'd have more to say. Well, fuck it. Fuck it all.

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Fri Feb 14, 2014 2:49 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Savages

Oliver Stone's movie left a sour taste in my mouth, though it had its moments. Benecio Del Toro is strong and I enjoyed the visuals and the music. But the rest of the cast is just ridiculous. I can't get behind Taylor Kitsch as an actor; he's like a less talented, second-rate Paul Walker. Blake Lively and Salma Hayek: both ridiculous. The story lacks suspense, and the plot itself doesn't make any sense. More or less just a bad movie, but fine as a one-time watch.


Fri Feb 14, 2014 4:34 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
MGamesCook wrote:
Savages

Oliver Stone's movie left a sour taste in my mouth, though it had its moments. Benecio Del Toro is strong and I enjoyed the visuals and the music. But the rest of the cast is just ridiculous. I can't get behind Taylor Kitsch as an actor; he's like a less talented, second-rate Paul Walker. Blake Lively and Salma Hayek: both ridiculous. The story lacks suspense, and the plot itself doesn't make any sense. More or less just a bad movie, but fine as a one-time watch.

I disagree, I thought it was a pretty good movie, both Lively and Hayak gave great performances and the plot made sense to me. Kitsch is a decent actor for the most part(though I did find him rather unremarkable in John Carter).


Fri Feb 14, 2014 4:37 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mark III wrote:
The Red Balloon

Watched as a family and it's pretty great. I was going to come in here with a long post about how the balloon symbolizes Judaism and kind of wing it from there but I don't have the heart to knock this delightful short film. There are two lines of spoken dialogue and the rest is a tour of small neighborhood in Paris lead by a boy, his balloon. I remembered, as I watched, how the end of the film scared me when I first saw it. The director later went on to invent the board game Risk. Hmmm. Thought I'd have more to say. Well, fuck it. Fuck it all.


This film is just visually marvelous. That it's largely due to nothing more than a bright red balloon is astounding. One of those films that demonstrates the visual power of the medium.


Fri Feb 14, 2014 9:54 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Gwaihir wrote:
Mark III wrote:
The Red Balloon

Watched as a family and it's pretty great. I was going to come in here with a long post about how the balloon symbolizes Judaism and kind of wing it from there but I don't have the heart to knock this delightful short film. There are two lines of spoken dialogue and the rest is a tour of small neighborhood in Paris lead by a boy, his balloon. I remembered, as I watched, how the end of the film scared me when I first saw it. The director later went on to invent the board game Risk. Hmmm. Thought I'd have more to say. Well, fuck it. Fuck it all.


This film is just visually marvelous. That it's largely due to nothing more than a bright red balloon is astounding. One of those films that demonstrates the visual power of the medium.


And won a Best Screenplay oscar with no dialogue!

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Fri Feb 14, 2014 10:22 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Jack the Giant Slayer - I enjoyed this film overall, but it did have some issues. While the ending did address some of the adaptation changes that surprised me, e.g. "WTF? Jack's Mother is dead?" the ultimate fate of the crown was a major eye-roller. Literally. I also couldn't help but notice the similarities to Hellboy II -- the opening fairy tale sequence would be called a rip-off by the less charitable, and the whole crown controlling a powerful army thing is pretty much a straight lift. At least one thing that was nice about the ultimate fate of the crown is that it avoided the plot hole that Hellboy II had at the end. You know I'm beginning to think that the Hellboy series is more influential than it's given credit for...

Anyway, JtGS: Entertaining, fun, but inconsequential for the most part. I wasn't really a fan of the execution of the giant battle; it seems that an army of giants should have been able to trample the castle more easily. I bought it in-movie, but afterwards thought: gee, shouldn't they have done more destructive acts than tug-of-war and throwing trees? Oh well. The acting is solid, but Nicholas Hoult is little more than a pretty (I guess) face. He was OK, but the film picks up immensely when Ewan McGregor and Stanley Tucci enter the picture. I know, shocking. Ian McShane has a solid turn as the king, and Bill Nighy may be threatening Andy Serkis in being the go-to guy to play CGI characters. I kid, but he's played his fair share of these roles too. Eleanor Tomlinson is fine as the princess, but it's pretty annoying that she's basically a damsel-in-distress despite the script's paying lip service to feminist ideas in her early scenes. Turns out she just doesn't want to marry the villain. Aw. McGregor steals every scene he's in natch, and the action sequences are fun. Neat visual ideas: the waterfalls from the giant realm misting into earth's clouds, the giants weighing down the beanstalks so they'll grow toward earth, and McGregor being a pig-in-a-blanket alongside pigs on a giant's cooking sheet. All in all, a fun time. 7/10


Fri Feb 14, 2014 11:49 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Two most recent:

Point Blank, John Boorman's 1967 Lee Marvin revenge vehicle, looks and feels a lot like a French New Wave version of the revenge tale. It also takes a page out of the Sam Peckinpah playbook by having its protagonist thrown headfirst into a world that's passed him by. While Peckinpah's movies look at men holding onto a code, Boorman seems more interested in exploring how Marvin's Walker has been unleashed on the world due to a change in societal mentality. It feels very at home with a handful of contemporary movies that explore the dehumanization of technological progress. Point Blank isn't so concerned with the technology part, but it certainly equates progress and the loss of human understanding. Most of the film's narrative conflicts arise from that idea. Walker insists he's only after the money he's owed the entire movie, but he's really out to take revenge on those who have caused this societal shift. There's a whole lot of allegory at play here, because on the surface this is something that could very well be mischaracterized as a bare bones suspense film.

The movie's ellipitcal nature is alternately fascinating and frustrating. It makes for some really great scenes, but there are also a handful of times the movie shows a scene that happened earlier in the film in order to ensure the audience keeps up. That's always frustrating. Still, it's a really good, smart artistic take on this kind of movie if that's your thing. I saw it theatrically last weekend and it's really stuck with me.

The Great McGinty is Preston Sturges' good-but-not-great (apologies to calvero, who I know is a big fan) political satire about a homeless drifter who swindles his way up the political ranks, all the way to Governor, thanks to getting in good with a corrupt, behind the scenes Boss (bawse, or bauce, if you prefer fratboy idiocy). The movie has social commentary to boot, but the most interesting thing to me is how the writing is a pretty wonderful blaned of old school classicism and risky inventiveness (for the time). It's told via flashback, jumps around in time (pre-Citizen Kane, which is kind of a big deal), and meshes humor, romantic comedy, and political drama together seamlessly. The manner in which the story is told is fantastic, however the story itself is a bit dated. In 2014 it feels par for the political course, while in 1940 it likely felt much more cynical. That's kind of a depressing thought, but we're a cynical people these days.


Fri Feb 14, 2014 1:46 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
PeachyPete wrote:
Two most recent:

Point Blank, John Boorman's 1967 Lee Marvin revenge vehicle, looks and feels a lot like a French New Wave version of the revenge tale. It also takes a page out of the Sam Peckinpah playbook by having its protagonist thrown headfirst into a world that's passed him by. While Peckinpah's movies look at men holding onto a code, Boorman seems more interested in exploring how Marvin's Walker has been unleashed on the world due to a change in societal mentality. It feels very at home with a handful of contemporary movies that explore the dehumanization of technological progress. Point Blank isn't so concerned with the technology part, but it certainly equates progress and the loss of human understanding. Most of the film's narrative conflicts arise from that idea. Walker insists he's only after the money he's owed the entire movie, but he's really out to take revenge on those who have caused this societal shift. There's a whole lot of allegory at play here, because on the surface this is something that could very well be mischaracterized as a bare bones suspense film.

The movie's ellipitcal nature is alternately fascinating and frustrating. It makes for some really great scenes, but there are also a handful of times the movie shows a scene that happened earlier in the film in order to ensure the audience keeps up. That's always frustrating. Still, it's a really good, smart artistic take on this kind of movie if that's your thing. I saw it theatrically last weekend and it's really stuck with me.


Concerning the highlighted part, I agree but think it's even more specific: 'Point Blank' is about the dehumanisation of employees in the modern corporate world. Walker is an old school working man who is looking for the guy responsible for his sacking (sort of) and, at the end of his path, only finds an anonymous organisation who don't even deal in cash anymore.


Fri Feb 14, 2014 3:22 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Targets (1968)
Legendary B-movie producer Roger Corman gave former film critic Peter Bogdanovich some leftover footage from a cheesy Boris Karloff horror movie, two days of extra shooting with Karloff, to which the actor was still contractually obliged, and a small budget. From this, Bogdanovich crafted an interesting but slightly frustrating movie with two parallel storylines: The first narrative is about Karloff playing a version of himself as an ageing horror movie icon, who wants to retire because he has become disillusioned with the business and who feels obsolete. The second plot strand is about a young, seemingly normal man, who is married but still lives with his parents. The first sign that something is amiss with him shows after he purchases a rifle and puts it in the boot of his car, which is already filled with guns. These guns are soon put to a terrible use when the young man murders his wife and mother, then climbs a tower and starts to shoot at cars, which are passing by on a nearby highway.
It is a bit of a problem that both stories are not connected at all and only converge at the very end of the film. For a long time, I felt as if I was watching two separate movies at the same time. Bodganovich’s idea is to juxtapose the fictional horror of old and the very real horrors of modern America, as exemplified by the sniper, who is modeled on the infamous case of Charles Whitman. He also contrasts Karloff’s charismatic persona with the bland, ordinary evil represented by the shooter. I suppose that the film also makes a point about violence in movies, but I don’t quite understand what that point is, which is symptomatic of ‘Targets’s certain lack of clarity and cohesion. Individual scenes are directed very, very well, though. Overall, it’s a good movie, but it doesn’t really deserve its status as a minor classic. (It is included in the book “1001 movies to see before you die”) 7/10

Blacula (1972)
As the title suggests, this is a blaxploitation take on Dracula.
I’ve actually seen ‘Blacula’ before and, as a rewatch, normally wouldn’t mention it in this thread. There was a novelty of sorts, though, because ‘Blacula’ was shown as an episode of a ‘Mystery Science Theatre 3000’-like TV show, with flashes commenting on the movie and intermissions, during which two comedians made fun of the film. This kind of treatment is useless for movies such as ‘Blacula’, which you wouldn’t watch anyway if you wanted to see a good horror movie or decent vampire film. You watch it because it is ridiculous, funny in a so bad it’s (nearly) good way and because it has the typical blaxploitation style. I don’t need two dorks telling me that and I don’t need them to belabour the involuntarily funny aspects of the movie. As for ‘Blacula’ itself: Surprisingly good opening credits scene, two or three rather stylish vampire attacks, a lot of trashy B-movieness and a decent soundtrack by the Hues Corporation (best known for their early Disco smash hit “Rock the Boat”). 5/10 for the movie, 3/10 for the “MST3K” treatment

Tremors (1990) vs. Piranhaconda (2012)
‘Tremors’ – a B-movie about a small, isolated town in the desert of the American South West being terrorized by predatory giant worms – is another rewatch. (I even saw it in the cinema back in the day.) Like ‘Blacula’, I am mentioning because of the above-mentioned ‘Mystery Science Theatre 3000’-like TV show. Unlike ‘Blacula’, ‘Tremors’ wasn’t actually shown on that program – it is way too good for that – but it contrasted nicely with the subject of “MST3K” on the same evening: A cheaply made direct-to-video monster movie called ‘Piranhaconda’, which, apparently, is a sequel to another direct-to-video monster film called ‘Sharktopus’ and, definitively, a blatant rip-off of ‘Anaconda’. Comparing both movies made me wonder why I like ‘Tremors’ and dislike ‘Piranhaconda’ and its ilk (‘Sharknado’, ‘Mega Shark vs. Crocosaurus’ etc.). After all, both are cheaply made monster movies, both are tongue-in-cheek and both feature relatively well-known actors (Kevin Bacon in ‘Tremors’, Michael Madsen in ‘Piranhaconda’). The difference is that ‘Tremors’ is based on an interesting idea: What would it be like if the soil under our feet wasn’t safe? And ‘Tremors’ has lots of fun with this premise. (Pole jumping becomes a survival skill.) In contrast, ‘Piranhaconda’ is only based on the assumption that combining “piranha” and “anaconda” makes for a funny name for a monster and the filmmakers were satisfied to leave it at that. It’s a movie title in search of a movie. Also, the bad CGI of ‘Piranhaconda’ and similar movies is no match for the decent practical special effects of ‘Tremors’, which also require some ingenuity on behalf of the filmmakers, because of their practical limitations. (It is not unlike ‘Jaws’ in this respect.) While I didn’t see enough of ‘Piranhaconda’ to give it a rating, ‘Tremors’ is good fun and even better than I remembered: 7/10

The Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009)
peng’s recent Wes Anderson thread and the very positive reaction towards this movie inspired me to watch this (stop motion) animated tale of a fox, who leaves his old chicken-stealing ways when his wife gets pregnant, but who can’t really settle in his domesticated life as a newspaper journalist and plans a spectacular last big job on three poultry farmers.
I think that there is something, well, phony about Wes Anderson’s movies (having seen ‘The Royal Tenenbaums’, ‘The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou’ and ‘Moonrise Kingdom’). I’m not referring to the quite charming artifice of Andersons’s style but, for a lack of a better expression, to the deliberate quirkiness of his movies, which makes them disingenuous: A true eccentric does something strange for its own sake, because he likes it, and irrespective or even despite of others finding it eccentric. In contrast, Anderson does strange things just because they are eccentric. For example, there is a subplot in ‘The Fantastic Mr. Fox’ concerning Mr. Fox’s nephew Kristofferson, who doesn’t only have an odd name, but also does yoga and knows karate. None of this is in any way relevant to the rest of the movie and only meant to be whacky. Nevertheless, I mostly liked Anderson’s movies – with the exception of the terrible ‘Life Aquatic…’ - and, although the problem of eccentricity for eccentricity’s sake also permeates ‘The Fantastic Mr. Fox’, I thought it was much less of a problem in this movie, perhaps because it is animated and, consequently, doesn’t really demand the same kind of identification with the characters as a live action film. In fact, I thought that ‘The Fantastic Mr. Fox’ is more poignant than Anderson’s other movies, but that may be because I can somewhat relate to the protagonist’s longing to live according to his nature as a wild animal rather than leading the domesticated life with all its responsibilities. The animation is pretty good and I liked its style, which is a matter of taste. The voice actors make for a stellar cast (George Clooney, Meryl Streep, Bill Murray, Willem Dafoe). And, most importantly, the movie’s quite funny. 7/10


Fri Feb 14, 2014 3:29 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Unke wrote:
Concerning the highlighted part, I agree but think it's even more specific: 'Point Blank' is about the dehumanisation of employees in the modern corporate world. Walker is an old school working man who is looking for the guy responsible for his sacking (sort of) and, at the end of his path, only finds an anonymous organisation who don't even deal in cash anymore.


Agreed completely. It's very much a movie of it's time in that regard. I didn't do a very good job of explaining it, but progress in the world of Point Blank has everything to do with corporate modernization, as opposed to the technological aspect we normally associate with the term progress today.

A lesser film would have outwardly shown Marvin's Walker freaking out at the end when confronted with the organization at the end. Instead, we're shown him not taking the money he's spent the entire movie trying to get, which is really the same thing.

My favorite thing about the movie is how Walker's entire arc is a byproduct of this changing mentality (or progress since that seems to be my word of the day). It's a very good, borderline great movie.


Fri Feb 14, 2014 3:39 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blue Jasmine - It is indeed all about Cate (paraphrasing JB). Well that's not entirely true, the acting is all-around great. Sally Hawkins deserved an Oscar nomination, though that might say more about the weak field last year to be honest. I had a thought that Alec Baldwin's Hal could be Blake from Glengarry Glen Ross in 20 years, albeit softened by family life (though he could still be an asshole in the office, since we only ever see him from Jasmine's POV). It's a solid performance from a guy who doesn't always dazzle but is usually reliable. Louis CK, Peter Sarsgaard, Bobby Cannavale, and yes even Andrew Dice Clay give nice performances as well. I particularly enjoyed CK, whose casting was particularly inspired because you never know if his moments of shiftiness early on (his "I have tinted windows!" line cracked me up) are due to his hiding something or because he (CK) has an innate weaselly quality, which definitely works for the character. Alden Ehrenreich is my "new name to watch" from this film; his turn as Danny isn't brilliant, but it's solid and suggests he has good work in his future.

Story-wise, this isn't Allen's best. It meanders through time and relationship issues, but having Jasmine front-and-center pretty much throughout keeps it from losing its way. Though the flashbacks were entertaining at times, I kept wondering what the point of them was other than padding the running time and casting Baldwin (after all, the dialogue more than explained what Jasmine's previous life had been like for me) but the last one does put a different light on Jasmine's situation. It is primarily a character study though, and Jasmine is a fascinating character to watch. She has many despicable qualities- snobbery, shallowness, and self-denial among them - but she's always interesting and largely thanks to Blanchett's complete embracing of the character is interestingly hard to dislike. Forget Best Actress, Blanchett's performance is the best I've seen from 2013, bar none. For the film I'll say 7.5/10, largely due to the acting.


Fri Feb 14, 2014 4:50 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
American Ninja (1985)

This "gem" managed to stay clear of my viewing radar until this morning. As a kid I held the box in my hands and debated the prospect of bringing it home on many occasions but, alas, I never did. Probably for the better. Versatile thespian Michael Dudikoff stars as an Army grunt trained in the shadowy art of ninjutsu and helps uncover corrupt military brass providing arms to rebels in the Philippines. Maybe there was drugs involved too. Irrelevant either way. What is relevant is there's a band of ninjas working for the bad guys and Joe AKA American Ninja kicks all of their asses.

1.5/4


Fri Feb 14, 2014 8:47 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Bondurant wrote:
American Ninja (1985)

This "gem" managed to stay clear of my viewing radar until this morning. As a kid I held the box in my hands and debated the prospect of bringing it home on many occasions but, alas, I never did. Probably for the better. Versatile thespian Michael Dudikoff stars as an Army grunt trained in the shadowy art of ninjutsu and helps uncover corrupt military brass providing arms to rebels in the Philippines. Maybe there was drugs involved too. Irrelevant either way. What is relevant is there's a band of ninjas working for the bad guys and Joe AKA American Ninja kicks all of their asses.

1.5/4

I quite enjoy the American Ninja series and I like pretty much anything with Michael Dudikoff.


Fri Feb 14, 2014 9:19 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Unke wrote:
[b]Piranhaconda (2012)


I'm assuming you watched this for reasons similar to my "With a name like Sharknado, it must be at the very least endearing". That was one I turned off when it became clear that the ideas ran out right after the title had been landed upon. There was a half-hearted attempt to beknight this one a cult classic, the producers booking it into theaters for midnight showings. In some parallel universe, it very well could be. It may play a double bill with Piranhaconda, even. The ideas aren't really the problem: it's the lack of strong commitment to the bloodletting, general merry carnage. Gratuitous nudity, why not. The Sharknados of this world aren't made with love enough to reach greatness; they don't dare scraping bottom when that's the only thing that could possibly make them something more than a SyFy timewaster.

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Sat Feb 15, 2014 3:47 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mark III wrote:
Unke wrote:
[b]Piranhaconda (2012)


I'm assuming you watched this for reasons similar to my "With a name like Sharknado, it must be at the very least endearing". That was one I turned off when it became clear that the ideas ran out right after the title had been landed upon. There was a half-hearted attempt to beknight this one a cult classic, the producers booking it into theaters for midnight showings. In some parallel universe, it very well could be. It may play a double bill with Piranhaconda, even. The ideas aren't really the problem: it's the lack of strong commitment to the bloodletting, general merry carnage. Gratuitous nudity, why not. The Sharknados of this world aren't made with love enough to reach greatness; they don't dare scraping bottom when that's the only thing that could possibly make them something more than a SyFy timewaster.

I found both films rather entertaining, Sharknado actually got a brief showing in theaters, would've loved to have seen it there.


Sat Feb 15, 2014 5:01 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Nebraska (2013)

A small film that excels in character details and melancholy mood (with bursts of uproarious but natural humor throughout), Nebraska is carried almost wholly by its performances, and all the people populating the film are fully realized and believable. Their dynamics are so well played that it makes each moment of poignancy and comedy land together wonderfully. After a whole film of empty buildings/fields and old neighbors being terrible, fitting the theme of how the past is not always the rose-colored best, all it takes is just a simple act of kindness in the now, before one's despair gets too thick, to lift their worldview up. Incredibly touching, those last 10 minutes. 8/10


Sat Feb 15, 2014 9:09 am
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