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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
I think Funny Games is a masterpiece and I frankly don't understand how others don't

I am officially naming this post structure "the Vexer". May his grand tradition embiggen us all.

Peng: I tend to think of RoboCop as a pretty sharp condemnation of America's penchant for corporatizing everything, but I never stopped to consider how it might come across for non-western viewers. How does its satire hold up? Do you see it as an American thing, or do you see it through the lens of your own country's social and political circumstances?

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Fri Feb 07, 2014 10:59 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The point about corporatizing comes across, but since it doesn't feel as pervasive here I'm inclined to think of it more as an American thing, at least to me. The satire of consumerism with the news, advertising, and reality tv is more resonant. Our current political circumstance (maybe "violent turmoil" is more like it; dunno if it's noticeable news yet over there) tends to make stuff that concerns mainly about news/advertising cycle and mob mentality resonate more deeply. 2013's No, about a historical Chilean election told through the ad men's perspectives, is especially eerie in how much it can be reflected on us.


Fri Feb 07, 2014 11:37 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I haven't heard much about the situation in Thailand from American news outlets (hey, did you hear there's a petition to deport Justin Bieber?), but I've heard some stuff about it from National Public Radio and the BBC World Service. I think the last thing I remember was a news story about the protesters going back on their promise not to disrupt the election. I can't claim to have too much of an understanding of the political situation over there.

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Fri Feb 07, 2014 11:55 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mark III wrote:
You're Next -- Excruciating Indie Guy in-joke (just check out the cast list... good gravy) that runs through the home invasion grist mill. You've seen it before. There's a small taste of domestic drama in the first act but this is jettisoned for a number of reasons: there are too many characters to develop any one of them into an interesting person, the movie is something of a comedy and thus can't sustain too much psychodrama, and the guys shooting arrows through the cast have no real interest in letting the more exciting premise develop. I disliked it and, after reading Slant's hilariously generous review, moved into contempt. It's pretty bad.


I was a fan of this one. It's only a little above average, but I enjoyed the dark comedy of combining the home invasion movie with a dysfunctional family. The idea that these people are fighting for their lives together despite not really liking each other made for something kind of neat, if not spectacular. And I straight up loved the girl who eventually becomes the main character.

I just went and read Slant's review and it's kind of nauseating. Placing it as some kind of anti-mumblecore manifesto just reeks of pretension. It comes off as an attempt to give the movie a meta feel that you (and I) took as a simple in-joke. Plus, they seem to be equating the mumblecore movement with hipsterism (an -ism I definitley just made up), and while there's certainly some crossover between the two, I think mumblecore has a bit more to offer than just irony for irony's sake.

NotHughGrant wrote:
The thing that's put me off watching 12 years so far isn't the subject matter or the violence, but McQueen himself.

It may be unfair to judge a Director from one film, but the turgid borefest of Shame was so completely pretentious and pointless that it led me to a hasty conclusion about the guy's entire MO.


Shame is fucking garbage. It's a...shame that movie ever got made! Seriously though, since you hated it, I can understand not wanting to check out anything else from McQueen, but I really liked Hunger and loved 12 Years A Slave, so I'm going to urge you to check them out anyway. If Shame was the first film of his I'd seen, I'd probably feel the same way.

Ken wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
I think Funny Games is a masterpiece and I frankly don't understand how others don't

I am officially naming this post structure "the Vexer". May his grand tradition embiggen us all.


Kunzy burn!

Kunz - can't remember, how do you feel about Haneke's other work?

Mark reappears, Haneke gets brought up, it's so 2010 on the forum right now. Where in the literal fuck is ed_metal_head?


Fri Feb 07, 2014 11:57 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Justin Bieber actually gets put into the evening international news section a few times here, lol. Our outlet isn't much better.

I think you pretty much gets the gist of the events (if not the several issues), mainly the stunning hypocrisy of some protestors. It's distressing to be in a minority opinion group, which frankly makes more sense, in Bangkok right now. It did lead to some great absurdity that I hope get a No satirical movie treatment one day. The humor will practically write itself, like when a colorful candidate went to vote, and then a protestor tried to block him. The candidate was not pleased.

Ok, back on movie topic... I also liked You're Next quite a bit, mainly because of the unusual Final Girl. Her presence subverts a lot of events around her and makes the usual horror plot points more entertaining.


Fri Feb 07, 2014 12:18 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
MGamesCook wrote:
Agreed about the passage of time. Some directors have mastered the epic pacing, McQueen still needs to work on it. Also glad someone else was bothered by the betrayal to which you refer; that was absolutely ridiculous and it's the one device used in the movie that makes me wonder about the motives of the filmmakers. The Schindler's List connection is starting to bother me though. I think people read too much into that similarity. I also feel that McQueen is going for a kind of escalation here, where each evil figure Solomon encounters is worse than the last. But if that's indeed what he was going for, I find it unconvincing. Cumberbatch's character is still a scumbag in every practical sense, no matter how sorry he feigns to be. Fassbender is evil, but really no worse than Giamatti, Dano, the whipper in the beginning, or even his kidnappers. Fassbender may be crazier, but I really think the movie starts to stagger a bit once he's introduced. It has nowhere left to go.

Also, why is the dialogue so flowery and eloquent? And there's times when McQueen's direction isn't quite up to the task. The stabbing of the man on the ferry...that just felt awkwardly executed from a purely filmic standpoint. It looked forced.

I dunno, I didn't hate the movie. I actually liked it way more than Lincoln. But it's the work of a director who has room for improvement in his craft.

I feel I don't understand film craft fully to comment on actual elements of how a film is put together, but I will agree that a lot of scenes felt awkwardly staged even to me. The stabbing scene you pointed out is a prime example. I think the point was to show how slaves are treated as disposable, but that sequence just didn't feel right when I saw it. The other scene that felt out of place was where Solomon makes out with another slave in a barn. And the most awkward scene was the long held closeup of Ejiofor's face towards the end. It's a single shot focusing on nothing but his face for almost a minute. No background music. Nothing else of note. And I couldn't make out its purpose. Some of the audience members had to stifle a laugh here. If the point was to allow Ejiofor to express a myriad of emotions in his face, then it didn't succeed. Ejiofor's face was almost one-note throughout that shot. I don't know. That shot, which called a helluva lot of attention to itself, did not work at all for me.

I will also agree that I cried more at the realization that a real man named Solomon Northup was enslaved for 12 years, and then became a free man again. And that Ejiofor's performance in those final few minutes was outstanding. It didn't have a lot to do with Steve McQueen.

I realize that I've nitpicked a lot, but I will still say that the film is one of the few must-watches from 2013. But as I said earlier, it will rank lower in my list than some of the other 2013 greats.

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Fri Feb 07, 2014 1:06 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Ken wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
I think Funny Games is a masterpiece and I frankly don't understand how others don't

I am officially naming this post structure "the Vexer". May his grand tradition embiggen us all.

Peng: I tend to think of RoboCop as a pretty sharp condemnation of America's penchant for corporatizing everything, but I never stopped to consider how it might come across for non-western viewers. How does its satire hold up? Do you see it as an American thing, or do you see it through the lens of your own country's social and political circumstances?


But I honestly don't mean that as a juvenile taunt. I think the movie is so brilliant and I just don't get how other people, particularly those who have seen a lot of movies, don't appreciate it. It's like if people were bitterly divided about Dr Strangelove.

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Fri Feb 07, 2014 2:19 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
Ken wrote:
JamesKunz wrote:
I think Funny Games is a masterpiece and I frankly don't understand how others don't

I am officially naming this post structure "the Vexer". May his grand tradition embiggen us all.

Peng: I tend to think of RoboCop as a pretty sharp condemnation of America's penchant for corporatizing everything, but I never stopped to consider how it might come across for non-western viewers. How does its satire hold up? Do you see it as an American thing, or do you see it through the lens of your own country's social and political circumstances?


But I honestly don't mean that as a juvenile taunt. I think the movie is so brilliant and I just don't get how other people, particularly those who have seen a lot of movies, don't appreciate it. It's like if people were bitterly divided about Dr Strangelove.


Good ideas, earnest execution and undeniable suspense don't necessarily a... good... movie make. Wait. I need to regroup.

Good ideas, earnest execution and undeniable suspense don't necessarily make Funny Games an enjoyable film. NOW WAIT! I know that a movie's enjoyability is but one factor and should not be the ultimate pivot point of success. But what to do with Funny Games, a movie that has a really good idea and a fine execution and undeniable suspense but also made me feel fairly bad and kind of ashamed for laughing at Troma films?

So I'll give you this: the movie is clever but hateful. There are many works of art out there that are capital-G Great that are just not likeable. They may still be brilliant, they may be great because they get people thinking and talking, but they suck on a completely different level that supersedes their intellectual gravity. That is, I think it's perfectly fine to hate Funny Games and appreciate that which it has to offer.

Or: I appreciate it plenty. It has things that needed to be said. Please don't make me watch it again.

You're next, You're Next:

Pete and others say it blends dysfunctional family drama with arrows, heads being punctured by said arrows. And it does! For about ten minutes. Then it changes into the same thing that Funny Games sought to stamp out of us. I just disliked the tongue-in-cheek tone and that fucking smugness of the filmmakers. I'll admit that Slant's review completely turned me against both the movie and, well, Slant Magazine. Why must they always spawn so far upstream? They ain't fishies.

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Fri Feb 07, 2014 4:35 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
You're Next never came across as "smug" to me in the least and i'm really not sure where you got that impression from, I don't think the film tries to do the same thing as Funny Games did at all. The latter film to me felt like it was going out of it's way to insult it's viewers for daring to watch it in the first place, the director even said "if you walked out on the film, you didn't need to see it"(or something along those lines).


Fri Feb 07, 2014 4:39 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Vexer wrote:
You're Next never came across as "smug" to me in the least and i'm really not sure where you got that impression from, I don't think the film tries to do the same thing as Funny Games did at all. The latter film to me felt like it was going out of it's way to insult it's viewers for daring to watch it in the first place, the director even said "if you walked out on the film, you didn't need to see it"(or something along those lines).


I just wrote about condescending quote marks and, wow, you totally just gave an example of what they are. You're so "eternal", Vexer.
You also missed the point of my post, while we're on the subject. That's okay. For the kids at the back of the room: I never said that You're Next was trying to do the same thing as Funny Games, only that Funny Games was a response to movies like You're Next. Which I'm 100% correct about, has absolutely nothing to do with opinion: the director has said as much, you even included a quote to support this.

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Fri Feb 07, 2014 5:04 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Thor: The Dark World (2013)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1981115/
Watched this since I remember sort of enjoying the first one on some level, even though I find most of these superhero films pretty average in general. Anyway, so the plot involves a lot of mumbo-jumbo about "convergence of the Nine Worlds", Aether and Dark Elves - with the leader of the latter (Malekith) intent on destroying the universe(!) presumably seriously limiting his future real-estate options. Still, at least he doesn't lack ambition. Asgard seems like it's ripe for the taking by pretty much any force with any sort of fire arm, since Asgard inexplicably insists on fighting only with medieval weapons, despite having technology that far exceeds anything we have. Indeed, this was the case when the Dark Elves invade Asgard, they predictably gunned down the waves of soldiers sent to fight them before they got anywhere near them. Perhaps they enjoy the challenge? Population control? Only King Odin's beam staff thingy and Thor's hammer seem to be of any use against a threat equipped with a range weapon.
I found myself not enjoying this one nearly as much as the first. The freshness of Thor has now completely left the building - perhaps it's the fault of Alan Taylor (replacing movie veteran Kenneth Branagh) who really only has TV experience, failing to keep things interesting. Was nice seeing Natalie Portman in something again though, but a shame that something couldn't have been better than Thor: The Dark World.
5.5/10.


Fri Feb 07, 2014 10:20 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Sherlock, Jr. (1924)

My second Keaton after The General. That one has some amazing sequences and a fun adventure vibe, but it doesn't focus on comedy and the story feels stretched thin often. Reduced to 44 minutes with a more simple, charming tale, this one works brilliantly. The pace is snappy, the stunts and gags rapid and joyful, and Keaton's intuitive, deadpan personality working to full effect. 9/10

Confessions of a Dangerous Mind (2002)

I know I have rented this film when it came out, but had virtually no memory about it whatsoever. This rewatch clears up why. A relatively straightforward script by Charlie Kaufman (that is still pretty oddball) combined with a lively but very light-touched direction from George Clooney. They make for a fun, energetic watch in the moment, but apart from Sam Rockwell's transformative performance nothing stands out or lingers long after. 7/10


Sat Feb 08, 2014 12:30 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
peng wrote:
Sherlock, Jr. (1924)


I've been intending to check this out since forever and have yet to make the plunge. It's not even 45 minutes, for chrissake.

Watched I Know Where I'm Going! by the beloved Archers. I'll praise the effects, the cinematography, and the epic location selections as being all uniformly excellent and will stop the praise there. I thought it was a just-okay movie, too familiar (unfortunately, my overexposure to this kind of movie was thanks in large part to movies no doubt inspired by this very article) and not especially distinguished after the great opening scenes. If you've ever seen a cutesy regional comedy/drama (Waking Ned Divine, The Matchmaker, the shot-by-shot rip-off of this called Leap Year), you've seen the majority of I Know Where I'm Going! although this is better than "cutesy regional comedy/drama". Still, it didn't really make my heart sing or make any much an impression on me -- decent, a little more simple than I'd hoped. The end was a disappointment although it was inevitable from frame 1. Maybe you saw something I couldn't see in it. Maybe you've heard of it. Who's to say.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Mark, I'll post my two dollars on The Hunt, and hopefully it'll address some of the points you raised. (Spoilers below, I am too lazy to quote everything in spoiler tags.)

To me, the point the film was trying to raise was how society perceives those accused of sexual crimes. That being the case, the choice of protagonist was apt. Someone who is purer than pure with angel wings sprouting from him is exactly what the film needs to tell its point of view. If someone like Lucas is almost instantly vilified after such accusations, what chance do the rest of the regular folk have?

On that note, I also liked the choice of the victim being Lucas' best friend's daughter. There's a scene where Lucas goes to said friend's house to clear the air but is almost beaten out. My first reaction was "Boy, was that an extremely irrational reaction, especially to someone who you've known since childhood." But parents are almost always not rational where their children are concerned. I've seen parents (my own even) lose it when told their kids are lying. (In fact, later the kid even tells them that she lied, and they refuse to believe her saying she is simply confused.) And given the nature of the offence here, their reaction was what you would expect with most parents. And if Lucas cannot convince his best friend that he is innocent, what chance does he have with the rest of the community? And if the person who has known Lucas the longest thinks he's guilty, the rest of the people will most certainly follow his lead.

As for not taking legal counsel, we don't know that he didn't. He is let go by the judge, so we can assume that he had some sort of help in the proceedings. It wasn't shown to us because it wasn't necessary to the film's goal.

Going back to the whole reason for The Hunt's existence being to show how society treats the guilty part, I would rate it as an unqualified success. There's a single mis-step where the bunch of hillbillies beat the crap out of Lucas' son, but for the most part, it straddles the line perfectly. The slow escalation of the treatment he gets from the community. Within a matter of a few days, everyone who respected him is vilifying him and wants blood. Even after he is found to not be guilty, that perception doesn't change. And that is another one of the film's goals. Irrespective of how your case pans out, if you're accused of such crimes and are labelled as an offender, there's little you can do to change that image. Once people's minds are made up, you're completely fucked. (The supermarket scene being the prime example of this.)

Even the ambiguous ending is a pretty damning indictment of the life of the accused in such cases. Who takes a shot at Lucas? Was it the elder brother of the little girl? Or was it simply someone who was aiming for something else and shot near Lucas by mistake? The point being Lucas can never feel safe in this community again. People will always have their doubts about him, and he will need to keep looking over his shoulder for all eternity.

As an aside, I've seen 3 or 4 instances (one in the tech community, the others in the Indian news) of sexual crimes recently in the news, and in all the cases the reaction has been pretty much like what it was in the film. Of course, the accused have all been guilty in said cases, but that is besides the point. You should've seen the press and public reaction before the guy was pronounced guilty. Even without knowing the full details the case, everyone and their mother were vilifying the dude and calling him all sorts of names. In the tech-community case, there was a senior figure in the community who came out and said that this reaction is wrong and we should hear the other side of the story, and he was vilified for supporting sexual harassment.

In fact, the first thing I thought of when I saw The Hunt was how the film would work if it was remade in a more urban/metropolitan setting. The remote village setting allowed the film to have a focused approach, but it didn't show the effect modern story-hungry media and social networks can have on cases such as these. It would make the film more difficult to manage for the director, but it would also make for an interesting case study.

As for your question: "Why doesn't this happen more often?" From what I took away from the film, a more apt statement would be: "When it does happen and you have a penis, your life will be completely fucked." You can take all the legal counsel you get. You can prove beyond doubt that you are innocent. But that isn't going to change the downwards spiral in your life after such accusations.

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Sat Feb 08, 2014 1:59 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
^^^ this


Sat Feb 08, 2014 2:09 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
@ Balaji Sivaraman

Persuasive, all of it. And a man less stubborn than myself would likely be able to take your fine arguments and forgive the movie some mistakes. Though maybe it isn't stubbornness so much as it is my pure feeling for the movie, the reality it was trying to convey and the way it went about that -- it often felt hollow, excellent points and a somewhat realistic approach be damned. There was something very two-dimensional about the characters, the way they were able to snap into hostility in such a brief span of time. Especially given that the people of this town knew Lucas.

You appreciated the movie for reasons I didn't appreciate it to the same degree, namely "the point the film was trying to raise was how society perceives those accused of sexual crimes". And that's exactly it: there was a strong, resonant message that appeared to dictate how the movie was scripted and acted. This isn't a terrible crime, understand, only that the movie felt more like a message wrapped up in a story's clothing. Given that the characters were two-dimensional (if that... some don't even have that) and that our protagonist is such a metaphor, the movie doesn't work perfectly well as great cinema. A noble message, a forceful conveyance: those are all well and good but they need a better, more persuasive framework. And your case for the movie is as good as any I've read.

A few selections on which I'd like to comment:

Quote:
As for not taking legal counsel, we don't know that he didn't. He is let go by the judge, so we can assume that he had some sort of help in the proceedings. It wasn't shown to us because it wasn't necessary to the film's goal.


I suppose this is true, that he may have sought counsel... but they didn't give us any indication that he sought help. His brother-in-law (?) is the one that involves the judge. I took it as Lucas not really knowing how to handle the situation and finding fortune in a person with a connection. Either way, you're right: that's not the movies goal. It did make the movie seem, briefly, as if it took place in another time when people weren't instantly litigious.

Quote:
Irrespective of how your case pans out, if you're accused of such crimes and are labelled as an offender, there's little you can do to change that image.


Absolutely true. The "error" listings in our newspapers are generally ignored in favor of the questionable headlines. There's something very interesting about the question: why do parents (and, by extension) communities want certain disasters to befall them? The movie didn't go there and so I can't really complain. But, in showing the community-fronted downfall of a man who's more metaphor than man, I couldn't find the depth of feeling needed to really appreciate this undeniably forceful movie. And powerful as it is, it needed something more than what it had to really hit home for me. It did cause discussion between me, my wife and peers and so its agenda was met. Not as an experience, as the best movies do.

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Sat Feb 08, 2014 2:43 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Thief - Frank has just pulled off what is meant to be his last major bank robbery without a hitch. As he looks in on the riches contained inside the vault, he allows himself the very slightest of satisfied smiles. He doesn’t know yet that his future is going to bring violence and heartbreak, but in that moment he seems perfectly content with the path life has led him on. Frank’s trajectory, and indeed the overall structure of the narrative, will be familiar to anyone who has seen their fair share of heist films, but in large part because of wonderful little moments like the one I just mentioned, Michael Mann’s debut feature from 1981 makes you care. James Caan deserves a lot of the credit for his great central performance, but Mann’s screenplay is just as valuable, devoting plenty of time to really get to know Frank. Like in a surprisingly direct diner scene where he lays everything out on the table for the woman sitting opposite him, his hopes and dreams, his fears and insecurities. Or in a crucial scene late in the film where he willingly starts in motion a chain of events that will end in him disappearing alone into a new life, if he survives long enough to get to that point.

Not many heist films take their anti-heroes to the places Mann and Caan explore here, and that gives Thief more resonance than your typical run-of-the-mill heist film. That, and just the way the film looks. This is a stylish film right from the opening, a jewel heist in the rain-stained streets of Chicago, set to a memorably dissonant electronic score from Tangerine Dream. And it just continues on from there, with Mann presenting a vision of the Windy City that doesn’t shy away from the seedier edges. The filmmaker has long proven himself to be an adept hand at wringing as much atmosphere possible from cityscapes, but Thief confirms his hand was sure right from the very beginning. While some awkward edits and strange beats do betray the fact that this is a debut feature, other moments are so remarkably assured that if you knew nothing about the production, you’d be forgiven for thinking it to be the work of a seasoned pro. Mann would go on to even more sure-handed work, but very few filmmakers today can claim ownership of a debut as confident as Thief. 8/10.

Fight, Zatoichi, Fight - The eighth film in the Zatoichi series. One of the more fascinating aspects of working through a lengthy series such as this one is seeing how each subsequent entry attempts to stave off complacency. Subtle breaks away from the norm can be thrilling, even if not every change is an entirely successful one. Judged on those merits, Fight, Zatoichi, Fight is a triumph, a film that stays true to what has come before but also breathes new life into the franchise. The film opens with the infamous blind swordsman on the road again, but this time he is being hunted by a gang of assassins. Through a series of misunderstandings, the assassins accidentally kill a young mother instead of Zatoichi, leaving behind an infant in need of protection. After learning of the slain woman’s plight and destination, Zatoichi takes it upon himself to deliver the child to its rightful home. On the way there, he encounters a female thief, who agrees to accompany him and help with the child for a small daily fee. As the journey continues, however, both Zatoichi and the thief grow closer to the little one in their care.

In some ways Fight, Zatoichi, Fight feels like a return to the series’ roots. Kenji Misumi, helmer of the original film, is back in the director’s chair, and there is a renewed emphasis on character over action. Apart from a memorable final showdown, in which Zatoichi’s opponents use a new tactic to drown out his hearing advantage, the film significantly scales back on swordplay. Free of the usual setups and story beats, the film is able to explore new dimensions of the Zatoichi character. This could have just as easily been called Zatoichi The Family Man, with its traveling company of Zatoichi, the thief, and the child forming a makeshift family unit, if only for a very short while. The third film in the series, New Tale Of Zatoichi, explored the blind swordsman’s desire to retire his violent ways and settle down to a peaceful life, but this story takes that idea further, providing a look at what Zatoichi would be like as a loving father and husband. That makes the tragic undercurrent to the whole affair even more heartbreaking; Zatoichi is destined to remain a lone wanderer, always on the run and always surrounded by danger. The poignancy Fight, Zatoichi, Fight brings to the character makes it the best entry in the series since the New Tale Of Zatoichi, and quite possibly the very best so far. 8/10.

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Sat Feb 08, 2014 10:59 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I was left cold (and slightly annoyed) by the flourishes in Manhunter, making me wonder if I was just not into the 80's style since many said that the film was a quintessential showcase of it. Thief changed my mind on that. Loved the film and its look. Its story just fits the style perfectly.


Sun Feb 09, 2014 12:11 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

Its effect is really startling this time. I feel like I must not have been mature enough when first watched it. The central conflict is about people foolishly trying to engineer by science the complexity that is memory and love. The film works on a similar level by jumbling the narrative up in Kaufman's brilliant concept and Gondry's breathless visual, and all those mechanic and structure only allow its message about human's profundity of experience to feel more effective and aching. For once, Kaufman's clever and inventive writing is fully backed up by the characters and emotional story, and it's really, really great. 9.5/10


Sun Feb 09, 2014 5:57 am
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Location: New Hampshire
Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Nebraska

A wonderful film, simply wonderful. I've always been a fan of Alexander Payne's work, and like his best film Sideways, this mixes moments of great drama with humor and does it effortlessly. There are moments in this film that are hilarious, and moments that are heartbreaking. Older folks are often used as comic fodder in films, presented as doddering fools, but Nebraska is different. Its elderly characters are very sympathetic, shown as folks who have had dreams, life experiences, joy and pain, and may or may not be satisfied with how their lives turned out. This is an outstanding film, and I highly recommend it.

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Sun Feb 09, 2014 11:29 am
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