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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
About Time (2013)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2194499/
Light as air British romantic dramedy (from maestro of the genre, Richard Curtis) about a young man who can travel back in time and relive (and reinvent) his past. This however is no The Butterfly Effect, and the time travel is very much secondary to the romance side of things. Rachel McAdams who seemingly does these sort of roles in her sleep (indeed this is the SECOND film in which her partner can time travel(!) - 2009's The Time Traveler's Wife), is effective as the love interest (Mary), while the Irishman Domhnall Gleeson is the time traveling Tim who uses his special ability to help him court Mary and solve various problems for his family and friends. The most refreshing thing about this film for me (other than the sci-fi element) is that it DOESN'T follow the standard rom-com "boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl back" story arc. He simply "gets girl", and events develop from there. Not a lot of meat here really, but you'd have to be an ice-cold cynic to not be at least a bit charmed by this one.
7/10. (as an aside, is it just me or does McAdams look a lot like a younger Jennifer Garner?)


Last edited by nitrium on Tue Jan 21, 2014 2:05 am, edited 1 time in total.



Mon Jan 20, 2014 5:44 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
nitrium wrote:
About Time (2013)


I have the same problem with it that James did. The time travel rules developed for the movie are broken.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
1. When he travels back before his daughters birth (to help his sister) and comes back, he no longer has a daughter, but a son. He goes and asks his dad, and his dad says something about how he can't go back farther than when his kids were borne or they will change. How does he fix that mistake?
2. He goes back in time to see his dad one last time (because he is about to have a 3rd child) and then the both of them travel even farther back in time to when he was a kid...then he comes back and nothing has changed. Well his dad had just told him he can't go back farther than when his kids were borne.

Those two things are a complete breakdown of the rules established for this movie...Impossible for me to ignore.


Mon Jan 20, 2014 6:53 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
roastbeef_ajus wrote:
nitrium wrote:
About Time (2013)


I have the same problem with it that James did. The time travel rules developed for the movie are broken.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
1. When he travels back before his daughters birth (to help his sister) and comes back, he no longer has a daughter, but a son. He goes and asks his dad, and his dad says something about how he can't go back farther than when his kids were borne or they will change. How does he fix that mistake?
2. He goes back in time to see his dad one last time (because he is about to have a 3rd child) and then the both of them travel even farther back in time to when he was a kid...then he comes back and nothing has changed. Well his dad had just told him he can't go back farther than when his kids were borne.

Those two things are a complete breakdown of the rules established for this movie...Impossible for me to ignore.


Even if the science fiction aspect is weak, the emotions are true. I gave it a ***

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Mon Jan 20, 2014 10:58 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
Even if the science fiction aspect is weak, the emotions are true. I gave it a ***

The Sci-fi aspect was very weak, but it wasn't really what the movie was about. It was used more as a cheap plot device than something that is genuinely essential for the story/romance to work. They could have just as easily handled the time travel scenes in a similar manner to Sliding Doors using alternate universes (i.e. branching timelines on every decision) and got the same results. Frankly time travel never makes a lot of sense at the best of times...


Tue Jan 21, 2014 12:20 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
August: Osage County (2013)

Like JB said, bad things happen to bad and good people alike. But the movie doesn't give me enough reasons why I should care. Very slightly redeemed a little by some performances (Julia Roberts, Margo Martindale, and Chris Cooper in particular) and for satisfying my question from The Fifth Estate that Benedict Cumberbatch can play a warm, normal (almost dumb) guy, after a string of cold genius s.o.b. roles. 4/10

Dallas Buyers Club (2013)

The commitment to formula is a litter hard to get by, but the resistance to melodramatic moments (most of the time) and engaging performances make it worth a watch. McConaughey deserves that nomination, while I am puzzled by the acclaims for Jared Leto. He gives a very good performance, but the screenplay just doesn't give him enough for nuance or depth. 7/10


Tue Jan 21, 2014 1:12 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
peng wrote:
Like JB said, bad things happen to bad and good people alike. But the movie doesn't give me enough reasons why I should care. Very slightly redeemed a little by some performances (Julia Roberts, Margo Martindale, and Chris Cooper in particular) and for satisfying my question from The Fifth Estate that Benedict Cumberbatch can play a warm, normal (almost dumb) guy, after a string of cold genius s.o.b. roles. 4/10


It's definitely running on a paper thin narrative--one that always seems to be having a difficult time escaping its stage roots. However the performances, along with the dark, realistic breakdown of this particular family, shine with merit.

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Tue Jan 21, 2014 1:55 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I saw Frozen for the second time over the weekend with my mother, and it was as entertaining and endearing as ever. Easily the best film Disney have produced in over two decades. My mother loved it as well, though my sister who saw it earlier wasn't as enamored with it as I was. I specifically have to state that the five-minute sequence immediately following Elsa running away into the North mountains is one of the best I've seen in any 2013 film, animated or otherwise. Idina Menzel sings Let It Go with a gusto that is riveting. I also ended up buying the soundtrack, which is totally worth the price of admission. It'd be worth it just for the aforementioned Let It Go, which is one of the best songs from a Disney musical ever, but it offers a lot of extras and unused tracks as well.

Interestingly, the composers introduce some of the unused tracks in the OST, and in particular they talk about how the film originally introduced the plot with a prophecy. It feels like certain elements of it made it into the final film, but I get the feeling they decided to do away with it altogether. On listening to some of the unused songs about the prophecy, I feel it could've added an interesting dimension to Elsa's character with the weight of the prophecy behind her.

Anyways, insofar as films are about the personal reactions they evoke in us, I absolutely loved Frozen. Something about the way it was put together and the way it depicted the notion of true love touched me, and I appreciated that. I am not talking about admiring a film's craft or considering it a cinematic masterpiece, I am simply talking about falling in love with the emotions depicted in the film, and how they make you feel warm and gooey inside. It's been a long time since that happened, and that's primarily the reason Frozen worked for me. (More often that not, this happens with rom-coms.)

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Tue Jan 21, 2014 3:49 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Metropolitan: Absolutely excellent movie. Reminds me a bit of Woody Allen, but I like this more than Allen. Engaging romantic atmosphere, interesting characterizations, and finds an ideal balance between quirky and dry.

Another Year: Also an excellent movie. I like it a lot more than Happy-Go-Lucky, which was interesting but un-affecting for me. Doing a "four seasons film" would normally seem like a cliche, but it suits Leigh's style perfectly. It's one of the ultimate slice of life movies, but it also feels like a unique story is being told. I found Leslie Manville's character extremely affecting. More than Hawkins in Happy or Staunton in Drake.


Tue Jan 21, 2014 3:57 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
MGamesCook wrote:


Another Year: Also an excellent movie. I like it a lot more than Happy-Go-Lucky, which was interesting but un-affecting for me. Doing a "four seasons film" would normally seem like a cliche, but it suits Leigh's style perfectly. It's one of the ultimate slice of life movies, but it also feels like a unique story is being told. I found Leslie Manville's character extremely affecting. More than Hawkins in Happy or Staunton in Drake.


I really liked this one too. I had a conversation with Jack Burns, who didn't like it at all, who claimed it was just miserable people being miserable, but I think Lesley Manville is much more than just a miserable person. She wants to be part of this family desperately, but the more she tries the harder she ends up failing. In some ways she deserves it, but I felt so sorry for her at the end. Terrific film.

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Tue Jan 21, 2014 7:30 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
12 Years a Slave

It's a pretty decent film overall, and I would say it's the most likely to win best picture. I have some reservations though. Ejiofor's performance is earnest, but his character could have been deepened. He endures, and that's pretty much all we know about him. The script gives Ejiofor no room for variation. I don't think, therefore, it's a truly Oscar-worthy performance. Compare it to Hounsou's performance in Amistad, which had more facets than can be counted. I think well-roundedness is important, no matter the material. The more brutal scenes have been over-hyped quite a bit. I found Django's scenes to be some of the most unpleasant and sickening I've seen in my entire life. The ones in this movie were done with dignity. Graphic, but not in bad taste.

The first hour is quite strong, but the second loses itself a bit. It starts to become repetitive and boring. The resolution is relieving and somewhat affecting, but I feel I've seen it a thousand times in other films. It accomplishes what it sets out to do, though its lack of ambition put me off a bit. There's nothing here we haven't seen in other films about slavery. No horror that hasn't been visualized before. And the story itself is stretched very thin. Its beats are limited and there are times when I feel that McQueen is struggling to justify the 2-hour run time. His direction is strong and confident. Hardly state of the art, but it doesn't really have to be.

Mostly, I respect the integrity of the project. The horror feels relatively true, not false cartoon exploitation BS like Django Unchained. 12 Years a Slave is respectable and solid, though nothing extraordinary.


Tue Jan 21, 2014 10:14 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
MGamesCook wrote:
The first hour is quite strong, but the second loses itself a bit. It starts to become repetitive and boring. The resolution is relieving and somewhat affecting, but I feel I've seen it a thousand times in other films. It accomplishes what it sets out to do, though its lack of ambition put me off a bit. There's nothing here we haven't seen in other films about slavery. No horror that hasn't been visualized before. And the story itself is stretched very thin. Its beats are limited and there are times when I feel that McQueen is struggling to justify the 2-hour run time. His direction is strong and confident. Hardly state of the art, but it doesn't really have to be.


Strongly disagree with this reading of the film. The second hour or so of the film is where all the ambition is. I agree that the first hour is strong (but familiar outside of Solomon's unique status as a free black man), but seeing how Solomon becomes enslaved is almost an entirely different movie than seeing what takes place once he's on a plantation.

More than any other slavery movie, McQueen's looks at slavery more as an institution than an injustice. That's not to say it doesn't show the cliched "horrors of slavery", but it lets those horrors speak for themselves and instead is more about slavery being an awful, highly functioning machine that keeps the powerful in power by using the "lesser" members of a society as cogs in a machine (sort of like capitalism...hello allegory!).

The distance the film employs (mentioned by most others, but not necessarily you) is done so to show that humans can acclimate to just about anything, but part of that acclimation has to involve giving yourself over to the idea that there may be no escape. You very well may just end up being a cog in this God-awful money making machine.
[Reveal] Spoiler:
I think Solomon becoming the “whipper” of Patsey is a visual metaphor for the point, and it’s underlined in the movie with the scene where Solomon finally gives himself over to singing the hymn when the old man dies. It’s shot all in closeup of his face, and Solomon, someone who has kept his entire situation at a mental distance (mirroring the overall tone of the film, I believe), finally gives himself over to the idea that he very well may be stuck in this predicament for the rest of his life. He sees his life in the old man’s, just a body that’s used up and discarded when it no longer works as the machine keeps chugging along. This scene also touches on the perverse notion that giving yourself over to the concept of God is akin to hopelessness in the film, but I can’t decide if that’s intentional or coincidental.


Tue Jan 21, 2014 12:48 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
If the film is really a large metaphor for capitalism...well, those are connections anyone could make any time without having to see this movie. It's no secret that the current economy is a machine which could use some improvement. But I definitely don't see the movie itself that way. I thought it was compelling enough as a literal narrative for about 80% of the time but don't think it holds up to much more than that.

Another flaw that bothered me: I thought the circumstances of Solomon's kidnapping were oversimplified. Frankly, it made Solomon seem a little too gullible and naive making sympathy for him unnecessarily challenged. It reminded me of the two cigar-smoking foxes who cozen Pinocchio.


Tue Jan 21, 2014 8:59 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
MGamesCook wrote:
If the film is really a large metaphor for capitalism...well, those are connections anyone could make any time without having to see this movie. It's no secret that the current economy is a machine which could use some improvement. But I definitely don't see the movie itself that way. I thought it was compelling enough as a literal narrative for about 80% of the time but don't think it holds up to much more than that.

Another flaw that bothered me: I thought the circumstances of Solomon's kidnapping were oversimplified. Frankly, it made Solomon seem a little too gullible and naive making sympathy for him unnecessarily challenged. It reminded me of the two cigar-smoking foxes who cozen Pinocchio.


You're ignoring my larger points and choosing instead to focus on something I mentioned in a parenthetical (and made no connection to anything current, but more capitalism as an idea). Just because I mentioned the allegorical connection to capitalism (a different thing entirely than a metaphor, btw), doesn't mean I think that's all the film is. Slavery as a machine to keep people in power doesn't just apply to economical issues, either. Using power to keep folks powerless is a fairly universal concept. And, you know, it absolutely applies to slavery itself, so it works on a literal level as well.

My point about the movie being more interested in the machine that slavery is more so than the easy-to-mine for drama "horrors of slavery", and the numerous visual and structural examples all over the film is more what I'm interested in. It's a fascinating way to frame the film, and the idea is subtly woven into the movie not so much through narrative, but through filmmaking choices. It's an example of a director using his filmmaking style (McQueen's has always been detached and observant as opposed to intimate) to leave an imprint on a movie. What makes it great is that his style fits what he's trying to accomplish perfectly.

As for your flaw: Narrative nitpicks like that don't really interest me when discussing a movie, to be perfectly honest. It's a perfectly valid way to react to that portion of the film, I just don't see any value in it other than saying "I liked that" or "I didn't like that". I bought it in the moment, you didn't. Alright.


Tue Jan 21, 2014 10:02 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
11;14 (2005)

First heard about this when I saw a trailer for it on my A History Of Violence DVD. This made me curious and so I added it to my Netflix que.

Surprising that this one didn't get more attention. It's a pretty good mix of dark comedy and drama. The hyperlink approach is similar to what we already saw in Magnolia, Short Cuts etc. But its approach is original enough it doesn't feel like a retread. The film in some ways is like a more gritty Go.

Kinda strange to see Elliott from ET driving drunk in the opening scene.

*** Quite entertaining.

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Tue Jan 21, 2014 10:52 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Quote:
You're ignoring my larger points and choosing instead to focus on something I mentioned in a parenthetical (and made no connection to anything current, but more capitalism as an idea). Just because I mentioned the allegorical connection to capitalism (a different thing entirely than a metaphor, btw), doesn't mean I think that's all the film is. Slavery as a machine to keep people in power doesn't just apply to economical issues, either. Using power to keep folks powerless is a fairly universal concept. And, you know, it absolutely applies to slavery itself, so it works on a literal level as well.

My point about the movie being more interested in the machine that slavery is more so than the easy-to-mine for drama "horrors of slavery", and the numerous visual and structural examples all over the film is more what I'm interested in. It's a fascinating way to frame the film, and the idea is subtly woven into the movie not so much through narrative, but through filmmaking choices. It's an example of a director using his filmmaking style (McQueen's has always been detached and observant as opposed to intimate) to leave an imprint on a movie. What makes it great is that his style fits what he's trying to accomplish perfectly.

As for your flaw: Narrative nitpicks like that don't really interest me when discussing a movie, to be perfectly honest. It's a perfectly valid way to react to that portion of the film, I just don't see any value in it other than saying "I liked that" or "I didn't like that". I bought it in the moment, you didn't. Alright.


I just don't have anything to say to your larger points other than they seem pretty accurate, though they don't contribute to my own opinion of the movie one way or the other. I think that even given that your point is true, the film still doesn't say anything about slavery that I didn't already know. I think it's a fair enough movie. Personally, I see nothing about it that's superior to 10 or 12 other films I saw in 2013.

What interests me in a movie in the internal psychology of the protagonist. I didn't see much of that here.


Tue Jan 21, 2014 11:02 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
A few movies I've seen recently; haven't had much time to post.

Her: Great thinking man's sci-fi. Like Jonze's other films, this will require multiple viewings to fully appreciate.

The General: Classic silent comedy; Buster Keaton was a badass, one of the cinema's greatest comedians and one of its greatest stuntmen too.

Sex Drive: Dumb, full of toilet humor but also has some genuine laughs. It's got more heart and care for its characters than most films of its type.

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Wed Jan 22, 2014 12:00 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Sexual Chocolate wrote:

The General: Classic silent comedy; Buster Keaton was a badass, one of the cinema's greatest comedians and one of its greatest stuntmen too.
.


You see, here's my problem with The General -- you say Keaton was one of cinema's greatest comedians, but I not only don't find the General funny, I legitimately have no idea what parts are supposed to be funny

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Wed Jan 22, 2014 9:32 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Red 2 (2013)
Retired CIA and MI6 agents (Bruce Willis, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren) travel around the globe in order to prevent a nuclear bomb from going off in the Kremlin. So they are searching for the missing scientific genius Bailey (Anthony Hopkins) in London, have an ecounter with a former Cold War adversary and KGB spy (Catherine Zeta-Jones) in Paris, are accompanied verywhere by Bruce Willis’s character’s wife (Mary-Louise Parker), who is looking for adventure, and are pursued by an Asian contract killer (Byung-Hun Lee).
This sequel to 2010’s action comedy ‘Red’ isn’t as good as the original and that was mediocre. The formula of some old codgers turning out to be superspies and saving the world is good enough for the odd comedic scene and there are some good visual gags, but the movie would have to be a lot funnier in order to work as a comedy. While Malkovich and Hopkins give suitably over the top performances, it may be funny to see Helen Mirren brandishing huge guns, but that joke got old the first time around. Bruce Willis seems completely disinterested and doesn’t have any chemistry with Parker, who is downright annoying (which, to be fair, might be the fault of how the character is written rather than her acting). Lee’s character is superfluous and only serves the function to intersperse the boring stretches (and there are a few) with generic martial arts scenes. The other action scenes are standard stuff, too: shoot-outs and car chases of the kind you’ll have seen 1,000 times before. The movie is mildly diverting, but no more than that. 4/10

Drug War (2012)
During a drug raid at a toll booth somewhee in China, police captain Zhang’s (or Chang’s?) (Sun Hong Lei) drug enforcement unit captures the meth producer Choi (Louis Koo), who agrees to cooperate with the authorities in order to avoid the death penalty. In the course of the risky investigation, Zhang grows increasingly suspicious of Choi.
‘Drug War‘ seems to be a bit of a forum favourite and perhaps my expectations were too high as a result. The movie provides a realistic (or seemingly realistic) look at an operation by a Chinese drug enforcement agency with few memorable set pieces. Apart from the ending, there isn't much action and the movie is not filmed in the stylised way, which I would have expected from noted Hong Kong action director Jonnie To. That doesn’t mean that ‘Drug War’ is a bad movie. Indeed, the relative lack of style and the setting in mainland China rather than in the overpopulated, neon-lit urban jungle that is Hong Kong helps to make the movie seem more realistic and sets it apart from the typical triad gangster movie. I also liked the performance of by the actor playing the police inspector. That being said, I also found very little to get excited about and the movie seemed to be somewhat inconsequential, although I cannot put my finger on the reasons for this. I doubt I’ll remember this film in a year’s time. Still, ‘Drug War’ is at least a very decent police procedural. 6/10

R.I.P.D. (2013)
When policeman Nick (Ryan Reynolds) informs his partner Hayes (Kevin Bacon) that he will return the gold, which they have embezzled in the course of a raid, he is murdered by Hayes. Because of his background in law enforcement, Nick is offered to redeem himself in afterlife and to join the Rest In Peace Department, which is protecting the living against the monstrous undead. To this end, Nick is partnered with the former Old West lawman Roy (Jeff Bridges).
I confess that I didn’t finish this film, so it could reasonably be argued that I’m not qualified to have an opinion on it. I couldn’t even tell you how much I’ve seen of this movie, because I kept nodding off after the half hour mark. However, I saw enough of ‘R.I.P.D.’ to know that my time would be better spend doing other stuff. That kitchen floor sure needed a good cleaning. My opinion in short: It’s a ‘Men in Black’ rip-off without any of the humour and excitement of ‘Men in Black’. And I didn’t even like ‘Men in Black’. 3/10


Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:00 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I also don't feel The General is very funny, but it is entertaining and I remember finding some set pieces pretty spectacular for its time.


Wed Jan 22, 2014 11:02 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
Sexual Chocolate wrote:

The General: Classic silent comedy; Buster Keaton was a badass, one of the cinema's greatest comedians and one of its greatest stuntmen too.
.


You see, here's my problem with The General -- you say Keaton was one of cinema's greatest comedians, but I not only don't find the General funny, I legitimately have no idea what parts are supposed to be funny


Keaton was the master of deadpan humor. His facial expressions or lack thereof are very funny. Granted, his style is not typical of silent comedy, but I think that makes him unique.

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