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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Zatoichi On The Road - The fifth film in the Zatoichi series. After three films of consistently high quality and one with a more workmanlike feel but an undeniably strong finish, this is the first Zatoichi effort to leave behind a slightly sour aftertaste. I suppose it was bound to happen; one can’t expect such an extensive series to move along without a handful of less remarkable entries. What’s interesting about Zatoichi On The Road is that it breaks from tradition in a number of welcome areas. It’s in the clash between old and new ideas where the problems surface. The film opens with the blind swordsman once again traveling through the countryside and being ambushed by a gang of foolhardy assassins. After making quick work of his assailants, Zatoichi meets the vengeful wife of one of the fallen, who expresses the desire to make his life a living Hell. Later on, Zatoichi finds himself escorting the young and beautiful Omitsu, a woman hungrily pursued by members of two rival clans in the near vicinity.

As mentioned earlier, the general feeling I took away from the previous film in the series, Zatoichi The Fugitive, was that its memorable conclusion made up for the ho-hum material preceding it. With Zatoichi On The Road, however, it’s almost the exact opposite situation. The opening sections are actually quite strong, and keeping Zatoichi on the road for most of the film is an appreciated shift away from the usual formula. In the past, the blind swordsman’s countryside wanderings would eventually lead to a town, where the rest of the action would take place. In this film, there isn’t a set location until the very end, and that gives the narrative its own unique feel. If only the ending felt as singular. Even with the priceless moment of Zatoichi stopping mid-fight to take a drink of water from a well, the climactic showdown in this film feels all too familiar. To pull an obscure reference out of the air, there’s a quote from Johnny Depp in Secret Window that applies here: “The only thing that matters is the ending. It’s the most important part of the story, the ending.” In general, if a film finishes with a bang, it’s likely to leave behind a more positive impression than a film that finishes with a whimper. And when it comes to that endgame, Zatoichi On The Road just doesn’t quite stick the landing. 5/10.

The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug - Watching the first part of Peter Jackson’s return to Middle-earth in the theater in late 2012 was a perplexing experience. And it wasn’t just because of the ill-fated decision to see the film in a high frame-rate screening, a decision I immediately regretted and still have nightmares about to this day. No, it was a perplexing experience because I walked out of the theater feeling almost nothing at all. That in itself was kind of a shock, especially coming from someone who still holds the original Lord of the Rings trilogy from a decade ago in high regard. Had this universe lost its capacity to amaze and thrill? That was the question I took into this second part of the story in the last days of 2013. And the good news is that, if only for a handful of precious moments, The Desolation Of Smaug recaptures some of the magic that was mostly missing in An Unexpected Journey.

One could look to many areas as reason for the jump in quality, but I think what I appreciate most about this new film is that it finally feels like its own thing. An Unexpected Journey, while containing its fair share of standout setpieces, was hindered by the decision to play the nostalgia card at every turn, wheeling out familiar faces and hinting continuously at a greater threat lurking in the shadows. This seemed to diminish the urgency of the main plotline; it’s tough to get invested in the quest of a band of dwarves to reclaim their homeland when you’re constantly being reminded of a much grander story to come. With the exception of the return of Orlando Bloom’s Legolas, this second part pushes most of the Lord of the Rings callbacks to the side, and that gives the action a fresher feel. It’s also a faster-paced film than the first, the torturously slow opening and stop-start rhythms of that introductory chapter replaced by a much more breakneck pace. There’s very little time to catch your breath, and while that makes for a wild first two hours, it does finally grows tiresome in the final stretch run. The production doesn’t quit when it’s ahead, and it’s really too bad, because with a little restraint The Desolation Of Smaug could have found a worthy place next to my memories of that first adventure through Middle-earth. 7/10.

The Wolf Of Wall Street - If there is one film genre I could point to that for me offers the least amount of personal excitement, it would be the epic crime saga, the decades-spanning chronicle of the criminal’s meteoric rise and equally meteoric fall. It’s a genre that has certainly spawned its share of masterworks, and in part because of that it’s also one that feels the most burnt out. What need is there for American Gangster when we already have the likes of Scarface and City Of God and Goodfellas and Casino? Well, leave it to the director of those last two films to find a fresh approach to this age-old genre. Martin Scorcese’s The Wolf Of Wall Street, about the wild life and times of New York stockbroker Jordan Belfort, wisely doesn’t play its material straight. Instead, the film has the tone of a party, albeit one I would never want to frequent. Although certainly a comedy, it’s of the very blackest variety, a satire that is more often painful than it is funny. I’m sure I cringed more often than I laughed, and I’m sure that was the intention.

The way I view it, the film isn’t so much about Belfort’s hellish journey into hedonistic oblivion as it is about his rabid pack of attack dogs who blindly follow him into the fire. The scariest scenes in The Wolf Of Wall Street aren’t the ones which find Belfort and his cronies engaging in countless assortments of wild excess, but the ones where Belfort addresses his office of ravenous associates. You can see the madness in their eyes as they mindlessly chant along to their leader’s battle cries; these people have sold off their souls just for the thrill of having more. It’s those scenes that drive home the film’s main point, that somewhere along the road the values in this country took a wrong turn. Since when did these kinds of soulless, money-seeking stock peddlers become the role models for America? Perhaps that isn’t the best question to ask here. How about this instead: when the end to this 180-minute monster finally comes around, which is more distressing, the idea that Belfort gets to continue preaching his perversion of the American Dream, or that so many are eager to lap up his words? 8/10.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
roastbeef_ajus wrote:
Vexer wrote:
Personally I think Bateman's a great actor, I like him in pretty much everything, even widely hated films like Teen Wolf Too. I personally found Identity Thief hilarious, I can understand people not liking Melissa McCarthy's character, though I personally found the route the film took with her interesting, it's not like her actions were entirely condoned though as
[Reveal] Spoiler:


It's not about her actions being condoned...I could care less if she went to prison or not. I think most people hate her character because she is annoying as fuck..like nails on a chalk board annoying every time she opens her mouth (and she also doesn't do herself any favors with her loud, obnoxious hair, makeup, and costumes). I did like her in bridesmaids however.


As much as I love Bridesmaids, that movie ruined Melissa McCarthy's career, at least for me. She wasn't always like this. She use to be a good actress in things like The Nines and Gilmore Girls. But then Bridesmaids came along and even though I thought she was the weakest thing about the movie, for some inexplicable reason, people loved her in that movie. So she's been basically playing that same persona in Identity Thief and The Heat. In The Heat, she got lucky. She got paired with Sandra Bullock who managed to bring out the best in her in that movie despite the fact that I couldn't stand her character, particularly in the beginning. I never even bothered with Identity Thief. I'm a fan of Jason Bateman, but the movie just looked too awful for me to see it.

BTW, Bateman was excellent in Juno, Disconnect and The Kingdom. He's also the best thing about the so-so Hancock. A movie with a great first half, and a not very good second half.


Thu Jan 16, 2014 5:21 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
ilovemovies wrote:
roastbeef_ajus wrote:
Vexer wrote:
Personally I think Bateman's a great actor, I like him in pretty much everything, even widely hated films like Teen Wolf Too. I personally found Identity Thief hilarious, I can understand people not liking Melissa McCarthy's character, though I personally found the route the film took with her interesting, it's not like her actions were entirely condoned though as
[Reveal] Spoiler:


It's not about her actions being condoned...I could care less if she went to prison or not. I think most people hate her character because she is annoying as fuck..like nails on a chalk board annoying every time she opens her mouth (and she also doesn't do herself any favors with her loud, obnoxious hair, makeup, and costumes). I did like her in bridesmaids however.


As much as I love Bridesmaids, that movie ruined Melissa McCarthy's career, at least for me. She wasn't always like this. She use to be a good actress in things like The Nines and Gilmore Girls. But then Bridesmaids came along and even though I thought she was the weakest thing about the movie, for some inexplicable reason, people loved her in that movie. So she's been basically playing that same persona in Identity Thief and The Heat. In The Heat, she got lucky. She got paired with Sandra Bullock who managed to bring out the best in her in that movie despite the fact that I couldn't stand her character, particularly in the beginning. I never even bothered with Identity Thief. I'm a fan of Jason Bateman, but the movie just looked too awful for me to see it.

BTW, Bateman was excellent in Juno, Disconnect and The Kingdom. He's also the best thing about the so-so Hancock. A movie with a great first half, and a not very good second half.

I don't think that film "ruined" her career at all, she didn't really make much of an impression on me in Gilmore Girls, she wasn't bad but she didn't really stand out in any way either. Bridesmaids really made me stand up and pay attention to her, her character was equal parts hilarious and charming and I think she's still a damn good actress, she had some of the best scenes in "The Heat"

I think you should give Identity Thief a chance, it's way better then critics made it out to be.


Thu Jan 16, 2014 5:26 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Unke wrote:
The World's End (2013)
Troubled 40ish year old Gary King (Simon Pegg) yearns for his glory days as a teenager in 1990, particularly the night of his final day at school, when he and his mates tried and failed to make the "Golden Mile", a pub crawl involving twelve pubs ending with "The World's End" .... the first half shows how pathetic it is remain in a state of arrested adolescence and to consider a teenage bender the pinncle of your life.


It is. And you know what, it's goddam true too.

I appreciate the study of inward-looking, English, goldfish-bowl towns; where going on benders like this is the cultural apex.

And it correctly tells us that this cycle takes a very conscious effort to break, and there is always at least one sad bastard left behind... AND .. that this sad bastard will probably have been the most popular guy at the time in question. All of these things I recognised full well.

Quote:
He manages to cajole his former friends (played by Nick Frost, Martin Freeman, Paddy Considine, Eddie Marsan), all of which are now middle-aged family man with careers, into a sort of reunion to attempt the epic pub crawl again. Soon, Gary's former mates become aware that Gary's life has gone downward ever since that night in 1990 and that he hasn't moved on in life. Just when things are about to come to a head, they make the astonishing discovery that robotic aliens have taken over their small home town of Newton Haven.

I should start by admitting my age: Like the protagonists of this movie, I was 17/18 in 1990, so the pop cultural references struck a chord with me. Hearing Primal Scream's "Loaded" over the opening credits gave me warm feeling of nostalgia. I didn't particularly miss listening to The Soup Dragons for 20 years, but hearing their cover version of "I'm Free" again was certainly welcome. 'The World's End' isn't 'American Graffiti', though, and not about nostalgia at all. While 'The World's End' makes some good points in this regard, it mostly mines the situation for comedy. This is a movie by the team of Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost (Of 'Shaun of the Dead' and 'Hot Fuzz' fame), after all, and it is pretty funny in the first half. The movie's tone changes completely when the alien invasion plot is discovered, though. The humour isn't character-based any more, but mostly consists of one-liers and slapstick variety. That doesn't mean that it is less funny, but I thought it was a shame that the movie didn't follow through on its starting premise, which wasn't really exhausted by the time it is basically dropped. Further, there are too many action scenes of the five friends fighting robots, which are all too long as well. It's funny to watch Nick Frost's pudgy character doing Wing Chun and WWF-style wrestling moves, but once is enough. Further, the filmmakers had a good opportunity for a biting satire about conformity, but don't sufficiently exploit it (apart from a nice scene which illustrates the regrettable expansion of identikit pubs run by large corporate chains at the expense of traditional drinking holes in Britain). Overall, 'The World's End' is a genuinely good comedy, but it had the potential to be even better. 7/10


I too appreciated the nostalgic use of 90s Britpop, and the social commentary on the demise of the proper English pub, and I also too agree that the alien invasion (to sound blatantly obvious) was a heavy-handed plot contrivance. I know that it was always meant to be part semi-social realism, part sci-fi comedy, but the plot could have worked without it.

So why the invasion? What is its metaphor? How a crisis pushes people closer together? How things move on behind what is happening at face-value? I've only watched it once so far, and I probably won't be able to give a fill answer to this (if ever) until I watch it at least one more time.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I had the opposite reaction to World's End, the action scenes were actually the best part for me. I found the humor very hit and miss and for me the dramatic scenes with Gary failed miserably. I didn't care about him the way Pegg and Frost clearly wanted me too. The film also went a little too far off the deep end in the third act with the introduction Bill Nighy's character and the ending came across as rather weak and uninspired. For me this film was overall extremely forgettable and a big step backwards from Hot Fuzz.


Last edited by Vexer on Thu Jan 16, 2014 1:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.



Thu Jan 16, 2014 6:32 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
What I did on my Summer Vacation (Get the Gringo)

In have a confession, I really like Mel Gibson as a film maker.

His style is extremely crude and betrays a self-loathing, almost sociopathic love of violence. But hell, he does know how to make it work! Who else could have made Apocalypto? Who else would have even considered it?

Summer Vacation isn't quite as brutal as that, but it does manage to combine various grotesques with a bit a slapstick. Mel plays a career criminal who is captured a few feet into Mexican territory following a bank robbery. He is then himself relieved of his worldly possessions by corrupt cops before being tossed into a Mexican prison that more resembles (in fact is) a functioning town run by a gangster/warlord of some kind.

Gibson makes it believable he could survive and even thrive in such a place. His marriage of old-age physicality and new-age wit means the first half of the film is a platform for how a man like him could adapt to the climate.

The second half of the film is entertaining but more problematic. It goes from gritty prison drama to Ocean's 11 style plot contrivance in a matter of minutes.

Not believable, but a serviceable 90 minutes if you come across it.

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Thu Jan 16, 2014 6:36 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Vexer wrote:
I had the opposite reaction to World's End, the action scenes were actually the best part for me. I found the humor very hit and miss and for me the dramatic scenes with Gary failed miserably. I didn't care about him the way Pegg and Frost clearly wanted me too. The film a;sp went a little too far off the deep end in the third act with the introduction Bill Nighy's character and the ending came across as rather weak and uninspired. For me this film was overall extremely forgettable and a big step backwards from Hot Fuzz.


I'm banking on it improving on subsequent watches, but I agree that it doesn't seem to be in Hot Fuzz's class.

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Thu Jan 16, 2014 6:38 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
NotHughGrant wrote:
So why the invasion? What is its metaphor? How a crisis pushes people closer together? How things move on behind what is happening at face-value? I've only watched it once so far, and I probably won't be able to give a fill answer to this (if ever) until I watch it at least one more time.


It's a metaphor for conformity, which is something Gary has been unable to do and the rest of his pals were all too willing to do. The movie shows Gary's choice to remain true to his uncompromised youth as just as valid as his friends' decision to forgo their youth and become a contributing member of society. Both choices have consequences - Gary ends up as a pathetic alcoholic who never "amounts" to anything, and the others lead boring suburban lives they don't really seem to enjoy. His friends aren't all that different from the aliens: they've lost some of their personality and identity in order to assimilate into a society. That's where the metaphor comes in to play.

It's a shame that Wright's movies never get the credit they deserve for their depth and insights. It seems like because the movies are comedic, people don't want to think about whatever issues Wright is trying to discuss.


Thu Jan 16, 2014 9:54 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
That's an interesting perspective. Although I would argue that only Eddie Marsan's character is truly disengaged with his own boring life - a kind of mirror image of Pegg's.

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Thu Jan 16, 2014 10:16 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
NotHughGrant wrote:
That's an interesting perspective. Although I would argue that only Eddie Marsan's character is truly disengaged with his own boring life - a kind of mirror image of Pegg's.


Nick Frost's character is going through a divorce, Martin Freeman's character has a home life where his wife doesn't seem to appreciate him, and Paddy Considine's character is still in love with a girl from high school. They may not be wholly unhappy, and bored was probably a poor word choice on my part, but there are elements of each man's life that justify his under-the-surface longing for Gary's way of life. The film consciously brings these up for that specific reason.


Thu Jan 16, 2014 11:06 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
NotHughGrant wrote:
Unke wrote:
The World's End (2013)
... The movie's tone changes completely when the alien invasion plot is discovered, though. The humour isn't character-based any more, but mostly consists of one-liers and slapstick variety. That doesn't mean that it is less funny, but I thought it was a shame that the movie didn't follow through on its starting premise, which wasn't really exhausted by the time it is basically dropped. Further, there are too many action scenes of the five friends fighting robots, which are all too long as well. It's funny to watch Nick Frost's pudgy character doing Wing Chun and WWF-style wrestling moves, but once is enough. Further, the filmmakers had a good opportunity for a biting satire about conformity, but don't sufficiently exploit it (apart from a nice scene which illustrates the regrettable expansion of identikit pubs run by large corporate chains at the expense of traditional drinking holes in Britain). Overall, 'The World's End' is a genuinely good comedy, but it had the potential to be even better. 7/10


I too appreciated the nostalgic use of 90s Britpop, and the social commentary on the demise of the proper English pub, and I also too agree that the alien invasion (to sound blatantly obvious) was a heavy-handed plot contrivance. I know that it was always meant to be part semi-social realism, part sci-fi comedy, but the plot could have worked without it.


Tut, tut, there was no "Britpop" in 1990 yet. That came with Oasis and the likes. We called it "Baggie" or "Madchester" (in the case of Primal Scream or The Soup Dragons etc.) or Dark/Gothic Wave (Sisters of Mercy) or simply Indie Rock then. ;)

PeachyPete wrote:
NotHughGrant wrote:
So why the invasion? What is its metaphor? How a crisis pushes people closer together? How things move on behind what is happening at face-value? I've only watched it once so far, and I probably won't be able to give a fill answer to this (if ever) until I watch it at least one more time.


It's a metaphor for conformity, which is something Gary has been unable to do and the rest of his pals were all too willing to do. The movie shows Gary's choice to remain true to his uncompromised youth as just as valid as his friends' decision to forgo their youth and become a contributing member of society. Both choices have consequences - Gary ends up as a pathetic alcoholic who never "amounts" to anything, and the others lead boring suburban lives they don't really seem to enjoy. His friends aren't all that different from the aliens: they've lost some of their personality and identity in order to assimilate into a society. That's where the metaphor comes in to play.

It's a shame that Wright's movies never get the credit they deserve for their depth and insights. It seems like because the movies are comedic, people don't want to think about whatever issues Wright is trying to discuss.


Hm, I think that you're right in writing that the movie contrasts Gary's unconventional lifestyle with that of his relatively conformist friends, but the movie doesn't do a good job of showing this contrast. Gary is simply too pathetic or too much of a caricature for me to believe that any of Gary's former friends subconciously wants to be Gary or lead his way of life. If I remember it correctly, Martin Freeman's character wanted to become a hotshot investment banker as a teenager and "only" ended up being a real estate agent with a possibly unhappy marriage. But would he really want to drive the same car, wear the same clothes and listen to the same music as when he was 17, nevermind a drug and alcohol problem and being a real tosser?

Anyway, my problem with the alien invasion isn't so much that it takes place at all and I think that it is a good metaphor for conformity. My problem is that 'The World's End' could have made much more of it. Once the "Blanks" are noticed, it's all action and slapstick and very little in the way of satire.


Thu Jan 16, 2014 12:41 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Unke wrote:
Hm, I think that you're right in writing that the movie contrasts Gary's unconventional lifestyle with that of his relatively conformist friends, but the movie doesn't do a good job of showing this contrast. Gary is simply too pathetic or too much of a caricature for me to believe that any of Gary's former friends subconciously wants to be Gary or lead his way of life. If I remember it correctly, Martin Freeman's character wanted to become a hotshot investment banker as a teenager and "only" ended up being a real estate agent with a possibly unhappy marriage. But would he really want to drive the same car, wear the same clothes and listen to the same music as when he was 17, nevermind a drug and alcohol problem and being a real tosser?


I don't think they want to lead Gary's exact life or anything like that, they just would like to have as few constraints and pressures as Gary. There's a ton of references to Gary being "the king" (most obviously it being his last name), and the movie makes it clear that these guys looked up to him at some point. Despite his life turning out pathetically, there's still some of that left, otherwise they wouldn't all agree to try The Golden Mile again in the first place. They may justify it as a way to pacify Gary, but I think there's a little more psychological complexity to the movie than that.

Unke wrote:
Anyway, my problem with the alien invasion isn't so much that it takes place at all and I think that it is a good metaphor for conformity. My problem is that 'The World's End' could have made much more of it. Once the "Blanks" are noticed, it's all action and slapstick and very little in the way of satire.


I'd argue that the entire ending sequence, from the time they go underground in The World's End, to the end of the film, serves as commentary. It may not technically qualify as satire, but it also isn't meant to just be taken as comedy. The movie shows that it's our ability to make decisions based on emotion and not purely logic that makes us human. Those choices may be irrational, and we certainly have to live with them, but it's still better to be able to make those choices than not.


Thu Jan 16, 2014 12:57 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
PeachyPete wrote:
NotHughGrant wrote:
So why the invasion? What is its metaphor? How a crisis pushes people closer together? How things move on behind what is happening at face-value? I've only watched it once so far, and I probably won't be able to give a fill answer to this (if ever) until I watch it at least one more time.


It's a metaphor for conformity, which is something Gary has been unable to do and the rest of his pals were all too willing to do. The movie shows Gary's choice to remain true to his uncompromised youth as just as valid as his friends' decision to forgo their youth and become a contributing member of society. Both choices have consequences - Gary ends up as a pathetic alcoholic who never "amounts" to anything, and the others lead boring suburban lives they don't really seem to enjoy. His friends aren't all that different from the aliens: they've lost some of their personality and identity in order to assimilate into a society. That's where the metaphor comes in to play.

It's a shame that Wright's movies never get the credit they deserve for their depth and insights. It seems like because the movies are comedic, people don't want to think about whatever issues Wright is trying to discuss.

I understood what the film was going for with the alien invasion, I just don't think it came across very effectively, I never really got a feeling of "depth" from the film.


Thu Jan 16, 2014 1:59 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Vexer wrote:
PeachyPete wrote:
NotHughGrant wrote:
So why the invasion? What is its metaphor? How a crisis pushes people closer together? How things move on behind what is happening at face-value? I've only watched it once so far, and I probably won't be able to give a fill answer to this (if ever) until I watch it at least one more time.


It's a metaphor for conformity, which is something Gary has been unable to do and the rest of his pals were all too willing to do. The movie shows Gary's choice to remain true to his uncompromised youth as just as valid as his friends' decision to forgo their youth and become a contributing member of society. Both choices have consequences - Gary ends up as a pathetic alcoholic who never "amounts" to anything, and the others lead boring suburban lives they don't really seem to enjoy. His friends aren't all that different from the aliens: they've lost some of their personality and identity in order to assimilate into a society. That's where the metaphor comes in to play.

It's a shame that Wright's movies never get the credit they deserve for their depth and insights. It seems like because the movies are comedic, people don't want to think about whatever issues Wright is trying to discuss.

I understood what the film was going for with the alien invasion, I just don't think it came across very effectively, I never really got a feeling of "depth" from the film.


I'm truly baffled by posts like these. You've made your opinion clear earlier in the discussion of the film, so why make such a dismissive post when an actual analysis of the movie is taking place? All these kinds of posts do is kill discussion (and we're having a pretty good one here, I think). They're pointless posts if you aren't adding anything to the discussion.


Thu Jan 16, 2014 2:19 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Captain Phillips
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1535109/
Compelling true-story about Somali pirates taking over a cargo ship helmed by Captain Phillips in the Somali Basin. Tom Hanks is (typically) excellent in the title role (his Oscar snub is really quite remarkable - this surely must be one of the best performances of 2013) and the unknown Somali pirates are suprisingly also effective. It is very much a film of two halves: the first half plays almost entirely on the cargo ship while the 2nd half takes place in the small confines of the ship's lifeboat (on which Phillips is taken hostage) and the military's efforts to rescue him.
I was a bit concerned about Paul "shaky cam" Greengrass directing (I generally find his films borderline unwatchable), but for some reason it sort of worked here - perhaps because it is set on ships which you expect to be moving. However, if you're prone to motion sickness, Greengrass' signature "style" is very much present here: it felt like most of the time a 6 year old with ADHD was behind the camera and the resulting footage edited with a paper shredder. That said, it's nonetheless a pretty solid watch.
8/10.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Trouble in Mind

Dug up this Alan Rudolph film from 1985. I think I actually prefer it to Choose Me, which is the only other Rudolph I've seen. It creates a relaxing atmosphere with a nicely controlled aesthetic; as low budget filmmaking, it's exemplary. But the story is weird, and some scenes are a bit silly. I won't return to it again any time soon, but definitely an interesting watch. Reminded me a little of Mona Lisa, but Mona Lisa is a much better film.


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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
'Jack Reacher' (McQuarrie, 2012) **1/2 out of ****
Holy fuck Werner Herzog was in this.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
PeachyPete wrote:
Unke wrote:
Anyway, my problem with the alien invasion isn't so much that it takes place at all and I think that it is a good metaphor for conformity. My problem is that 'The World's End' could have made much more of it. Once the "Blanks" are noticed, it's all action and slapstick and very little in the way of satire.


I'd argue that the entire ending sequence, from the time they go underground in The World's End, to the end of the film, serves as commentary. It may not technically qualify as satire, but it also isn't meant to just be taken as comedy. The movie shows that it's our ability to make decisions based on emotion and not purely logic that makes us human. Those choices may be irrational, and we certainly have to live with them, but it's still better to be able to make those choices than not.


I completely agree that the ending addresses these points. I also took it as a reference to the many episodes of the original Star Trek series, in which Captain Kirk argues with a tyrannical artificial intelligence about the freedom to make decisons and how the A.I.'s attempt to create a better society by force actually makes it worse for the humans. (Typically, the artificial intelligence would then state "does not compute" and explode in a shower of sparks and smoke.) I'm a little surprised that Berardinelli didn't pick this up.

As you wrote before, 'The World's End' does have some depth, in my opinion more than 'Hot Fuzz', which is more of a straight parody of action movies. That's the very reason for my disappointment at the numerous action sequences towards the end, because th movie had the potetial to be even better.


Fri Jan 17, 2014 6:17 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JJoshay wrote:
'Jack Reacher' (McQuarrie, 2012) **1/2 out of ****
Holy fuck Werner Herzog was in this.


And fucking terrific in it!

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Fri Jan 17, 2014 7:28 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Unke

Quote:
As you wrote before, 'The World's End' does have some depth, in my opinion more than 'Hot Fuzz', which is more of a straight parody of action movies. That's the very reason for my disappointment at the numerous action sequences towards the end, because th movie had the potetial to be even better.


Yet Hot Fuzz is exactly as deep as it needs to be. Not completely without depth (I think Nick and Danny's relationship is nicely handled), but obviously less of a self-conscious nostalgic tour-de-force in the personal sense, but rather an action film homage.

But I agree that although The World's End wasn't disappointing, nor was it as good as I hoped.

I hope to be proven wrong on subsequent watches.

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Fri Jan 17, 2014 8:12 am
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