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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
peng wrote:
It seems to work well (in term of representation, not quality) for a mainstream romantic comedy or ensemble drama, but just for an interesting afterthought rather than an actual criticism.


Agreed. Particularly since it was never meant to be a test, just a thought-provoking comment.

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Sun Dec 29, 2013 11:14 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The women can talk about men. That just can't be all they talk about. The obvious issue being that women aren't being fairly represented if the female characters only exist in relation to the male characters. You rarely see this problem in the opposite direction--male characters who only exist in order to relate to the female characters.

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Mon Dec 30, 2013 12:51 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Vexer wrote:
I agree, it would be unrealistic if women didn't talk about men at least once in awhile. The 2008 film "The Women" may not necessarily pass the "test" but that dosen't mean the female characters are any less interesting.


But the women in the film can talk about men. They just also have to talk about something else.

The Women easily passes the test.

Sexual Chocolate wrote:
I've always found that to me rather constraining. Human relationships can be absolutely fascinating on film, and male-female relationships have formed the backbone of many great films. I've always felt that women discussing men doesn't necessarily cheapen the female characters; it depends on the context of the film.


Sure, there's nothing necessarily wrong with a film that fails the bechdel test. In fact, a film can still be grossly sexist and still pass. And a film can be wonderfully complex and equally involve both sexes and still fail. It just makes the whole film industry in general feel kind of constrained when a relatively small number of films pass the test; us humans are a complex lot, living a huge variety of experiences. You'd think films would capture at least a slightly larger chunk of that.


Mon Dec 30, 2013 1:07 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Ah I understand the test now. I'll admit there are some films where the characterization of women stands out in a bad way, like The Covenant, as Dustin Putman said, the female characters esentially only talk about guys and nothing else(though to be fair it's a crappy movie regardless of all that) and of course there's Twilight, which has probably the worst written lead female role of all time.

Here's some interesting articles about audience reactions to a 2012 screening of From Russia With Love, seems others shared my reactions to it.

http://blogs.indiewire.com/pressplay/from-russia-with-love-is-not-unsophisticated-you-are

http://www.overthinkingit.com/2012/09/19/from-russia-with-snub/


Mon Dec 30, 2013 3:04 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Heathers

Winona Ryder is the best thing about this movie. Christian Slater gives a silly Jack Nicholson imitation and nobody else can act. It's a bad, poorly directed movie but it has certain positive aspects. Some scenes do feel ominous in a weird sort of way, but that tone is never sustained for very long.


Mon Dec 30, 2013 3:34 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
This is the End (2013) - 3 out of 4

Rogen, Baruchel, and Franco effectively parody themselves in this post-apocalyptic comedy. Random Wikipedia browsing told me that this is a longer version of the short Jay and Seth vs The Apocalypse which would explain the threadbare plot. As I read somewhere, it almost feels as if the entire film was adlibbed with very little script to go on. But who cares when the laughs are this good and almost consistent. Danny McBride channels all his darkness in an OTT portrayal which completely works. Craig Robinson and Jonah Hill provide solid support, with the later especially getting good stuff towards the end.

The big problem I have with this movie is that they ruined a lot of the best laughs in the trailer. Emma Watson's hilarious cameo followed by McBride's equally funny line: "Hermione just stole all our shit." were both part of the trailer. And the laughs for these scenes, and some others like how Michael Cera meets his end, are diluted solely because of that. The actual context of why Hermione steals all their shit is laughworthy in and of itself and has to do with the acoustics in Franco's new mansion. I would've laughed a lot harder had I not known what was coming.

The film sort of falls off towards the end, but this is still one of the best comedies I've seen in recent memory.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Die Nibelungen: Siegfried

What a film! I saw a beautifully restored HD print of the first part of Fritz Lang's two-part epic and it was stunning. This was the LOTR of it's day and in many ways betters those excellent films. It is hard to believe that this was filmed in 1924. The sets are spectacular, rivaling and even surpassing Lang's more well-known Metropolis in parts. The special effects are better than many modern films, which is hard to believe considering the technology they were working with.

A great adventure film and tragedy. Siegfried is cast perfectly, as is King Gunther. unfortunately, Kriemhild is not. She was so mannish, she looked like she wandered in in drag from a Monty Python skit. Not a good impression for the "most beautiful woman in the world."

I did also have some trouble reading the old German font, but that's not the film's fault. It definitely helps to have a native speaker around to help out if necessary. :)

Anyway, a great film experience. Looking forward to part two- Kriemhild's Revenge.


Mon Dec 30, 2013 8:10 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
MGamesCook wrote:
Heathers

Winona Ryder is the best thing about this movie. Christian Slater gives a silly Jack Nicholson imitation and nobody else can act. It's a bad, poorly directed movie but it has certain positive aspects. Some scenes do feel ominous in a weird sort of way, but that tone is never sustained for very long.

Know what I remember most about this movie? The way Christian Slater's eyebrows stay cocked even when his eyes are half-closed.

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Catch Me If You Can

The funniest thing about Catch Me If You Can is that the protagonist is able to con people mostly out of natural charm, and his pursuer is (just has to be) the most charmless and incapable-of-being-charmed character in the movie. The picture is structured as two parallel threads: a thread of one con after another, with increasing audacity that is matched by a thread of increasing loneliness. It's a fundamentally lighthearted movie that nevertheless understands its characters and doesn't deprive them of the darkness of their inner lives.

There's a Frank Capra sensibility about it, which is great, because people who don't know much about movies of Capra's time often dismiss them as quaint and naive. Capra cared more about humanity, warts 'n' all, than his reputation suggests. I think Spielberg (when not in prestige picture mode) is often tagged with the same unfairness.

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Mon Dec 30, 2013 8:58 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Some long overdue catch-up, from the second week in December (it was a good week too):

Blancanieves - Earlier in the year, while browsing through the selection of film books at the local library, I came across a copy of Francois Truffaut’s Hitchcock, the famous interview the French New Wave auteur conducted with the Master of Suspense. It was a fascinating read, full of interesting anecdotes and little nuggets of wisdom. Most memorable for me was Hitchcock’s idea of requiring every film student to make a silent film, so they would learn to tell their stories purely through the visuals, without relying on dialogue to fill in any gaps in imagination. It’s an idea director Pablo Berger seems to have taken to heart with Blancanieves, a silent reimagining of the classic Snow White fairytale that transposes the action to 1920s Spain. With her mother dead from childbirth and her matador father paralyzed from a bullfighting accident, the fairest of them all finds herself mainly in the care of others as a child, eventually and most ominously her evil stepmother (wonderfully played by Maribel Verdu). I would imagine most everyone is familiar with the original fairytale, so it should come as no surprise when “Snow White” flees from her stepmother and finds herself among a company of dwarves, here re-imagined as a traveling band of bullfighters.

It's difficult to talk about a silent production in this day and age without bringing up a specific Oscar winner from recent history. Blancanieves is less of a crowd pleaser than 2011's The Artist, but it feels like a more valiant and successful experiment.The Artist, while a film of many strengths and charms, was constantly reminding the viewer that its existence was essentially a novelty. Blancanieves plays everything straighter, and without the jokey approach and “nudge-nudge wink-wink” moments of self-aware levity, it’s amazing how quickly one forgets about the complete absence of dialogue. With little reliance on intertitles, Berger instead advances his story mainly through clever visual metaphors (my favorite: a girl’s white dress being dyed black for a funeral). It helps too that Berger doesn’t completely constrain his approach to match the filmmaking standards of the silent era. The film is a more diverse blend, with the classical visuals and expressionistic shadow work mixing in with inventive, almost New Wave-style editing techniques. Paying homage to the past while also delivering something fresh and exciting is not an easy balance to find, as many recent filmmakers have found out the hard way. But by using the past as inspiration, Berger finds a way to make this classic story feel new again. 8/10.

Frozen - When did mainstream animation become so disposable? It’s a question I couldn’t help asking myself when I was sitting through the previews in front of Disney’s latest animated effort. One by one the previews went by, each advertising a similar-looking product, filled with wisecracking anthropomorphic creatures, cheap lowbrow gags, and voiceover work from “celebrities” chosen for their name recognition rather than their talent. After awhile it started to get incredibly distressing: is all this really what passes for acceptable family entertainment these days? Things started to look up with a new Mickey Mouse short film (awkwardly titled Get A Horse!), which cleverly blends retro and modern cartoon techniques together in genuinely inventive ways. And then the main feature began, and all my fears were brushed to the side, if only for a short while. From beginning to end, Frozen is the kind of family film you see so rarely nowadays, one filled with beautiful animation, lively and engaging characters, a strong crop of musical numbers (only one of which I felt was redundant and tedious to get through), and an incredibly winning spirit. You can bemoan Disney for perhaps relying too much on their usual formula, but I think there’s something to be said for a formula that has proven itself to be timeless.

Still, it’s not like Frozen strictly binds itself to that time-worn formula anyway. In fact, the film strikes down one of the oldest tropes in the book, true love at first sight, and it finds ways to subvert tradition in other areas too. This is the film Brave could have been had it bothered with providing a compelling narrative to go along with its compelling heroine. It’s true, Frozen doesn’t completely eliminate the romance element like that flawed Pixar film, but it’s nowhere near the dominating element that drives the central characters. That would be the complicated relationship between two sisters. When was the last time that was the primary focus in an animated film? With Pixar still mired in what is now a fairly prolonged slump, it’s great to see Disney pick up the slack and show how popular animation can still be more than just assembly-line amalgamations of whatever is “hip” with the kids nowadays. Nobody is going to remember those kinds of films in future decades. Frozen, just like the other recent Disney efforts The Princess And The Frog and Tangled before it, is made to last. 9/10.

Nebraska - It’s been more than a couple weeks now, but I can’t get Nebraska out of my mind. It’s an odd thing; when I walked out of the theater, I wasn’t thinking to myself that I had seen a great piece of work. But Alexander Payne’s latest has lingered far longer than I ever would have expected. It’s a simple story at heart, a road movie where previously-distant people grow closer together, with everything accompanied by a gently elegiac musical score. But it’s also about the complications between family, and the ill wills that can grow with time between relatives both immediate and not so immediate. When our elderly hero returns to his sleepy Nebraskan hometown, we immediately understand why he left the miserable place so many years ago. He might not have found paradise elsewhere, but he escaped when he had the chance, and those that remained behind still resent him for it. The screenplay isn’t exactly subtle with this material, but it plays well against the film’s stark black-and-white cinematography.

Memorable performances abound, from June Squibb as the sassy mother and the snarling Stacy Keach as the town heavy to Will Forte and his surprisingly effective dramatic turn as the weary son. Really though, this is Bruce Dern’s film. While the veteran actor has had his moments to take the lead (most memorably in Silent Running and as the male protagonist in Alfred Hitchcock’s final film Family Plot), his career seems defined more by his supporting roles. Personally, I’ll always remember him the best for his small but brilliant performance in Support Your Local Sheriff!. But even in films I haven’t enjoyed, like Drive, He Said or Twixt, he manages to rise above the muck. Now there’s this role in Nebraska, which, despite the abundance of acclaim Dern has received and the moment in the spotlight he has long deserved, is actually an incredibly understated performance. His character doesn’t change much throughout the course of the film, but our perception of him changes, as we gleam various details of his background from others. The senile old fool we meet at the beginning is a far cry from the quietly noble man we leave at the end, but Dern is like a rock the whole way through. In the end we’re left with a more complete understanding of a man. At first I wondered if that was enough. Now I’m thinking it’s more than enough. 8/10.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blonde Almond wrote:

Frozen - When did mainstream animation become so disposable? It’s a question I couldn’t help asking myself when I was sitting through the previews in front of Disney’s latest animated effort. One by one the previews went by, each advertising a similar-looking product, filled with wisecracking anthropomorphic creatures, cheap lowbrow gags, and voiceover work from “celebrities” chosen for their name recognition rather than their talent. After awhile it started to get incredibly distressing: is all this really what passes for acceptable family entertainment these days? Things started to look up with a new Mickey Mouse short film (awkwardly titled Get A Horse!), which cleverly blends retro and modern cartoon techniques together in genuinely inventive ways. And then the main feature began, and all my fears were brushed to the side, if only for a short while. From beginning to end, Frozen is the kind of family film you see so rarely nowadays, one filled with beautiful animation, lively and engaging characters, a strong crop of musical numbers (only one of which I felt was redundant and tedious to get through), and an incredibly winning spirit. You can bemoan Disney for perhaps relying too much on their usual formula, but I think there’s something to be said for a formula that has proven itself to be timeless over the history of film.

Still, it’s not like Frozen strictly binds itself to that time-worn formula anyway. In fact, the film strikes down one of the oldest tropes in the book, true love at first sight, and it finds ways to subvert tradition in other areas too. This is the film Brave could have been had it bothered with providing a compelling narrative to go along with its compelling heroine. It’s true, Frozen doesn’t completely eliminate the romance element like that flawed Pixar film, but it’s nowhere near the dominating element that drives the central characters. That would be the complicated relationship between two sisters. When was the last time that was the primary focus in an animated film? With Pixar still mired in what is now a fairly prolonged slump, it’s great to see Disney pick up the slack and show how popular animation can still be more than just assembly-line amalgamations of whatever is “hip” with the kids nowadays. Nobody is going to remember those kinds of films in future decades. Frozen, just like the other recent Disney efforts The Princess And The Frog and Tangled before it, is made to last. 9/10.


We usually see eye to eye on a lot of things Blondie, but here we couldn't be further apart. I've been sprinkling my complaints around the forum--but for starters:

1. Too much plot. ( Sister needs saving, other sister has her plot as well, "villains" also have their flimsy plottings, oh the town also needs saving. etc.)
2. Silly red herrings--the debunked notion of "true love at first sight" might have worked better if there wasn't such an agenda behind it.
3. Poorly written songs (i.e. let it go, let it go, can't hold it back anymore, turn my back and slam the door…..)

Lets not forget that Disney still sticks to their "traditional guns" in quite a few regards. For example, We have a WHITE princess that needs a saving of sorts. We also encounter mystical/fabled characters that don't really add a whole lot to the narrative per se. Yea, Frozen takes a more feminist approach, but the tried and true formula is still there in my opinion.

Also I don't completely buy the sisterly relationship. These two gals were locked up in a castle for over 10 years and never interacted. Its a big stretch in my opinion. We have nothing to go on other than the notion of "sisterly love." Not to say thats not sweet and heart warming, its just a little superficial in my opinion.

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Tue Dec 31, 2013 12:00 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The Wolf of Wall Street

This is not a subtle film. From the opening images, in which two men throw a midget into a target for fun, Martin Scorsese makes it pretty clear what he thinks of Wall Street. This film has been called shocking and disgusting, but those criticisms miss the point. Scorsese aims to shock and disgust because his subjects and the lives they live are so contemptible. The film, in telling the story of people who stole from working Americans to get rich, and continued to steal just because they could, seethes with contempt over what runaway unregulated capitalism hath wrought.

Leonardo DiCaprio deserves an Oscar for this film. He won't get it; The Wolf of Wall Street is too disturbing in its implications, his character too ruthless, too representative of the worst of America. The same can be said for just about everyone in this film; the entire cast projects the ugliness of post-Reagan "greed is good" America and forces the viewer to confront it, and ask why the hell we tolerate this insanity.

The Wolf of Wall Street is three hours long, but it flies by in a pace that is just dizzy. The dialogue zips and pops and makes the viewer feel as if they too are one of the coke-addled degenerates that populate the film. This is a fast film, but it is never confusing, because we never lose sight that greed dominates every action by every character in this film.

The Wolf of Wall Street is a great film, the best Scorsese has made since The Departed, and one of the defining films of the decade so far.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Sexual Chocolate wrote:

Leonardo DiCaprio deserves an Oscar for this film. He won't get it; The Wolf of Wall Street is too disturbing in its implications, his character too ruthless, too representative of the worst of America. The same can be said for just about everyone in this film; the entire cast projects the ugliness of post-Reagan "greed is good" America and forces the viewer to confront it, and ask why the hell we tolerate this insanity.


This.

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Tue Dec 31, 2013 12:11 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
I thought it was the best explanation of the American economy I'd ever seen.

Lots of great performances, including DiCaprio, Jonah Hill and Margot Robbie. Totally skewed morality, when you take a second to think about all the people these parasites are screwing over. People who want to get rich quick, which is what con artists thrive on. Robbie probably won't get an Oscar nomination because of the nature of her role (which requires a lot of nudity), but she's terrific.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JackBurns wrote:
Blonde Almond wrote:
Frozen


We usually see eye to eye on a lot of things Blondie, but here we couldn't be further apart.


I know, right? Weird.

JackBurns wrote:
1. Too much plot. ( Sister needs saving, other sister has her plot as well, "villains" also have their flimsy plottings, oh the town also needs saving. etc.)
2. Silly red herrings--the debunked notion of "true love at first sight" might have worked better if there wasn't such an agenda behind it.
3. Poorly written songs (i.e. let it go, let it go, can't hold it back anymore, turn my back and slam the door…..)


I'm willing to give some of this a pass, in part because the film isn't really geared towards us nitpicky 20-somethings. Still, I think some of those criticisms are over-inflated, especially that third point. Musical numbers are more than just lyrics. Within the context of the film, I think that song, with its strong melody and the solid emotion behind it, plays wonderfully.

JackBurns wrote:
We have a WHITE princess that needs a saving of sorts.


Honestly, I think this is a non-issue. In the past two decades, Disney has had a Native American heroine (Pocahontas), an Asian heroine (Mulan), and an African American heroine (The Princess And The Frog). I think they've done fairly well when it comes to diversity. Also, if I'm remembering this correctly, the ice farmer's valiant race to rescue Anna ends up not meaning much of anything.

JackBurns wrote:
We also encounter mystical/fabled characters that don't really add a whole lot to the narrative per se.


The trolls I'll give you. I mentioned that there was one song in the film that got on my nerves. That was the troll song. Most audience members will have already picked up on the romantic connection between Anna and the ice farmer, we didn't need that laborious three minutes to hammer that point home.

I guess there's not much else I can say other than it really clicked for me. It reminds me a lot of a couple years back when I was really high on Midnight On Paris. Most of the other forum members enjoyed the film, but they weren't as completely enthusiastic for it as I was. Frozen will find a spot onto my Top 10, and I imagine I'll be the only one to hold it in that high a regard.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blonde Almond wrote:
Honestly, I think this is a non-issue. In the past two decades, Disney has had a Native American heroine (Pocahontas), an Asian heroine (Mulan), and an African American heroine (The Princess And The Frog). I think they've done fairly well when it comes to diversity. Also, if I'm remembering this correctly, the ice farmer's valiant race to rescue Anna ends up not meaning much of anything.


Other examples: an Arabian princess (Aladdin), a dark-skinned Native-Hawaiian lead (Lilo & Stitch), another Native princess (Atlantis). Also, I don't remember if it was on Emperor's New Groove that there was a Native princess as well.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blonde Almond wrote:

I know, right? Weird.


*Sigh* It was bound to happen someday :cry:

Blonde Almond wrote:
I'm willing to give some of this a pass, in part because the film isn't really geared towards us nitpicky 20-somethings. Still, I think some of those criticisms are over-inflated, especially that third point. Musical numbers are more than just lyrics. Within the context of the film, I think that song, with its strong melody and the solid emotion behind it, plays wonderfully.


I don't think my criticisms are inflated, if anything I think they are tremendously fair...

I agree, there is much more to musical numbers than just lyrics, even though I would argue its an extremely important element. But as I've mentioned before, the musical numbers always felt overly compartmentalized here. Transition in musicals should feel organic, but I really didn't feel that way about Frozen.

Blonde Almond wrote:
Honestly, I think this is a non-issue. In the past two decades, Disney has had a Native American heroine (Pocahontas), an Asian heroine (Mulan), and an African American heroine (The Princess And The Frog). I think they've done fairly well when it comes to diversity. Also, if I'm remembering this correctly, the ice farmer's valiant race to rescue Anna ends up not meaning much of anything.


It may not be an issue per se, but I feel its very apart of Disney's standard formula. How hard is it to make characters a different race? I would argue not very. We can disagree though.

Blonde Almond wrote:
The trolls I'll give you. I mentioned that there was one song in the film that got on my nerves. That was the troll song. Most audience members will have already picked up on the romantic connection between Anna and the ice farmer, we didn't need that laborious three minutes to hammer that point home.


TRUTH.

Blonde Almond wrote:
I guess there's not much else I can say other than it really clicked for me. It reminds me a lot of a couple years back when I was really high on Midnight On Paris. Most of the other forum members enjoyed the film, but they weren't as completely enthusiastic for it as I was. Frozen will find a spot onto my Top 10, and I imagine I'll be the only one to hold it in that high a regard.


I can hear you out for sure. We can agree to disagree. Your still tops in my book Blondie.

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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Sexual Chocolate wrote:
The Wolf of Wall Street

This is not a subtle film. From the opening images, in which two men throw a midget into a target for fun, Martin Scorsese makes it pretty clear what he thinks of Wall Street. This film has been called shocking and disgusting, but those criticisms miss the point. Scorsese aims to shock and disgust because his subjects and the lives they live are so contemptible. The film, in telling the story of people who stole from working Americans to get rich, and continued to steal just because they could, seethes with contempt over what runaway unregulated capitalism hath wrought.

Leonardo DiCaprio deserves an Oscar for this film. He won't get it; The Wolf of Wall Street is too disturbing in its implications, his character too ruthless, too representative of the worst of America. The same can be said for just about everyone in this film; the entire cast projects the ugliness of post-Reagan "greed is good" America and forces the viewer to confront it, and ask why the hell we tolerate this insanity.

The Wolf of Wall Street is three hours long, but it flies by in a pace that is just dizzy. The dialogue zips and pops and makes the viewer feel as if they too are one of the coke-addled degenerates that populate the film. This is a fast film, but it is never confusing, because we never lose sight that greed dominates every action by every character in this film.

The Wolf of Wall Street is a great film, the best Scorsese has made since The Departed, and one of the defining films of the decade so far.


Nailed it. It doesn't explicitly condemn this kind of thinking the way Oliver Stone's Wall Street did. I'm reminded of this quote from Roger Ebert's review of Goodfellas.

Quote:
And it is there, on the crux of that paradox, that the movie becomes Scorsese's metaphor for so many modern lives. He doesn't parallel the mob with corporations or turn it into some kind of grotesque underworld version of yuppie culture. Nothing is that simple. He simply uses organized crime as an arena for a story about a man who likes material things so much that he sells his own soul to buy them—compromises his principles, betrays his friends, abandons his family, and finally even loses contact with himself. And the horror of the film is that, at the end, the man's principal regret is that he doesn't have any more soul to sell.


A lot of people would probably expect Scorsese to parallel Wall Street with the Mafia or depict it as a respected white collar variation on the organized crime he shows in many of his other movies. He doesn't.

A good many of the films released over the course of the last year are rants against the narcissistic horror that the last decade has been (Spring Breakers, The Bling Ring, Pain And Gain). This is the most effective of them. Scorsese never lets the rant overshadow the story.

After much thought I give it the full **** and close to the top of the list for 2013.

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Quote:
Scorsese aims to shock and disgust because his subjects and the lives they live are so contemptible. The film, in telling the story of people who stole from working Americans to get rich, and continued to steal just because they could, seethes with contempt over what runaway unregulated capitalism hath wrought.


I'm just thinking, we already know these things from real life. We already know that these people exist. Why do we need a movie to tell us about how bad they are?


Tue Dec 31, 2013 3:08 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Frozen

I liked Tangled, the film that Frozen is the spiritual sequel to. But this is just too contrived and cutesy for its own good.

Tangled is a bit messy, but uplifting and fun to watch; whereas Frozen's messy-ness is enough to render significantly unenjoyable.

There isn't a joke that isn't telegraphed for miles, and the nonsense plot and shallow characterisations waste the impressive visuals

My Daughter liked it though

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Tue Dec 31, 2013 7:17 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
MGamesCook wrote:
Quote:
Scorsese aims to shock and disgust because his subjects and the lives they live are so contemptible. The film, in telling the story of people who stole from working Americans to get rich, and continued to steal just because they could, seethes with contempt over what runaway unregulated capitalism hath wrought.


I'm just thinking, we already know these things from real life. We already know that these people exist. Why do we need a movie to tell us about how bad they are?


As working in finance is still considered a respectable aspiration, I don't think the subject is nearly as played out as you think it is

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Tue Dec 31, 2013 9:45 am
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