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Last Movie You Watched 
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
Thief12 wrote:
Today I continued my journey through Hitchcock's early silent filmography and ventured into what I think was his first (and only?) comedy:


Don't forget The Trouble with Harry


I haven't seen that one.

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Sun Nov 24, 2013 9:23 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Before Sunrise

Two travelers meet on a train and spend the night wandering around Vienna where they fall in love. Before Sunrise is a wonderful film, and if anything it is a great example of why we need the movies; isn't a story like this a distant fantasy for many of us? The acting from the two leads is excellent, and the film is never boring. As a matter of fact, it really moves, a rarity among films that are talky. Dazed and Confused is my favorite Linklater film, but Before Sunrise is masterful in its own way: charming, uplifting and bittersweet.

And BTW, Julie Delpy is a gorgeous woman.

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Sun Nov 24, 2013 10:56 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Sexual Chocolate wrote:
Before Sunrise

Two travelers meet on a train and spend the night wandering around Vienna where they fall in love. Before Sunrise is a wonderful film, and if anything it is a great example of why we need the movies; isn't a story like this a distant fantasy for many of us? The acting from the two leads is excellent, and the film is never boring. As a matter of fact, it really moves, a rarity among films that are talky. Dazed and Confused is my favorite Linklater film, but Before Sunrise is masterful in its own way: charming, uplifting and bittersweet.

And BTW, Julie Delpy is a gorgeous woman.


Yes! Yeeeeeeeeeees! Now go watch the sequels!

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Sun Nov 24, 2013 11:05 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
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if anything it is a great example of why we need the movies; isn't a story like this a distant fantasy for many of us?


I'd rather just meet a girl, hold onto her, and marry her. I think in most real life cases, Hawke and Delpy wouldn't have too much trouble doing just that. Personally, I don't go to movies to see my own fantasies acted out.


Sun Nov 24, 2013 11:10 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
MGamesCook wrote:
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if anything it is a great example of why we need the movies; isn't a story like this a distant fantasy for many of us?


I'd rather just meet a girl, hold onto her, and marry her. I think in most real life cases, Hawke and Delpy wouldn't have too much trouble doing just that. Personally, I don't go to movies to see my own fantasies acted out.


*makes jack off motion* Oh come on! Everyone does to a certain degree. You've never wanted to fight in a war, or start a revolution, or meet a hot European chick on a train?

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Sun Nov 24, 2013 11:15 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
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*makes jack off motion* Oh come on! Everyone does to a certain degree. You've never wanted to fight in a war, or start a revolution, or meet a hot European chick on a train?


Yes to the last one, but I wouldn't let her go without getting her number and address.


Sun Nov 24, 2013 11:40 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
You've never wanted to put on a tuxedo, thrash an international terrorist in a game of cards, down a good stiff drink, and collect a new venereal disease from a different woman every night? Anyone? No one? Just me? Okay.

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Sun Nov 24, 2013 11:45 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Ken wrote:
You've never wanted to put on a tuxedo, thrash an international terrorist in a game of cards, down a good stiff drink, and collect a new venereal disease from a different woman every night? Anyone? No one? Just me? Okay.

Image

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Mon Nov 25, 2013 12:49 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Certified Copy (2010)

So.. is this a Rorschach test of a movie, or a misleading narrative cleverly cloaking the real one? I know it has been compared a lot to the Before movies, but that's when Before Midnight hadn't come out yet. Maybe that film has colored my view of this a bit, but my choice for that first question is the latter one...

[Reveal] Spoiler:
Much like the crisis of Jesse and Celine in Midnight, both movies explored the evolving nature and problems in marriage, and how it both enriches and erodes over time. All with role-playing a key plot point.


And that's not even getting into the theme of "copy", in which many have said it to argue for the opposite of my interpretion. I myself think the theme can be applied thoroughly with my choice, but well.. maybe it's really a Rorschach test? Still, whether what the viewers decipher of the narrative, the movie manages to pull this off while not ignoring the basic requirements of good cinema, if one chooses to simply watch it without going into dissection: beautifully lensed, engaging dialogue, and great performances. Between this luminous role and Camille Claudia 1915 this year, Juliette Binoche is starting to gain track as one of my favorite actresses (I know I'm pretty late to the game). Despite what one thinks of the narrative, her banter with William Shimell feels authentic and poignant, and much like the Beforefilms, it illustrates some of long-term relationship's truths and concerns thoughtfully. 9/10


Mon Nov 25, 2013 5:22 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Ken wrote:
You've never wanted to put on a tuxedo, thrash an international terrorist in a game of cards, down a good stiff drink, and collect a new venereal disease from a different woman every night? Anyone? No one? Just me? Okay.


I enjoy watching someone do those things. Wouldn't want to do them myself unless you could somehow take out the venereal diseases, life-risking, and torture. But it is, in a sense, a realization of a fantasy. I don't see that in Before Sunrise though.


Mon Nov 25, 2013 5:50 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
Thief12 wrote:
Today I continued my journey through Hitchcock's early silent filmography and ventured into what I think was his first (and only?) comedy:


Don't forget The Trouble with Harry


And Mr. and Mrs. Smith.

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Mon Nov 25, 2013 9:20 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
The World's End I'd been waiting for this one for awhile. It was on my list to catch in the theater, but my training schedule and other committments kept it until rental release.
I really enjoyed it and especially enjoyed the dynamic between Frost and Pegg as compared to their personas in the previous two Cornetto's. You can get a far better description of this movie from JB's review than I could give, so I'll not bother attempting. I will say that I found more depth here than in Fuzz and found this on par with Sean. Seeing a Bond girl at a pub table with Bond and the four friends (not from James Bond) in a non-Bond film was a bonus. ("Four Non Bonds" -What a great name for a band)

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Mon Nov 25, 2013 10:51 am
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Hello, Reelviews! How have you been? Good? Good. I've been swell, thanks for asking.

MGamesCook wrote:
The Innocents 1961

Really excellent movie. First-class spookiness. Direction by Jack Clayton is extremely fluid, and never really misses a beat. He does a great job of visually communicating the true nature of the story (as he interprets it)

[Reveal] Spoiler:
My interpretation is that Deborah Kerr is a paranoid schizophrenic who causes all the trouble herself. The kids are creepy and overly shrewd, but early exposure to explicit sex and unpleasantness will do that; not necessarily ghosts. Many scenes of the film feature Deborah Kerr jumping to random conclusions to the sheer bafflement of the uneducated housekeeper. There's never any official reveal, but it's clear long before the ending that Kerr is the one who's nuts. So instead of the clunky, awkward, silly, long revelation at the end of Shutter Island, Clayton is content to render the truth in visual terms. But even if the place is really haunted, Kerr is still the one responsible for the boy's death.


It's a hell of a movie, right? I watched it this October as part of my horror month and it ended up being my second favorite (behind The Rocky Horror Picture Show, for anyone that cares). It's genuinely creepy, which isn't something I can say about very many hororr movies. I love that's it's ambigious and how you can use that to explore concepts of belief and faith, or you ignore the larger implications and try to figure out exactly what the hell was going on. It's just a brilliantly done film.

JamesKunz wrote:
Dallas Buyers Club (2013) **1/2

Color me a bit disappointed in this one. The performances are good as advertised, but the movie is fairly shapeless and when it does follow some sort of storyline or arc, it's normally a fairly predictable one. All things considered, I'm a bit surprised by the love that this film is getting. It won't sniff my 2013 Top 10


I saw this yesterday as the second part of a double feature (with Nebraska, which I'll get to in a second) and I couldn't agree more. The most interesting thing about the movie - the medical environment surrounding AIDS medicine in the 80s - is kept mostly in the background in favor of a pretty dull, cliche exploration of a man going from a homophobe to someone who accepts their plight through first-hand experience. It's Movie of the Week-type stuff that feels like something I would have been shown in middle school in the mid-90s. The pacing is all wonky, as well. Just a weird movie to be receiving so much praise.

The acting is great, however. I thought McConaughey was playing himself a bit the first half, but he's really good in the second. I also thought Leto was excellent.

Nebraska

JB hasn't reviewed it, the AV Club found it disrespectful to Payne's hometown, and The Dissolve deemed it essential viewing. Considering those are the 3 main places I get my reviews from, I genuinely didn't know what to expect going into this one. After seeing the movie, I think the AV Club largely missed the point of the movie, in that it isn't interested in paying homage to a town or way of life, but in using that town to help a son learn about his distanced, emotionally absent father. It's a subtle movie about a man who's life has been full of hardship that's left him incapable as a father, only what we're privy to is the winding down of that life. Bruce Dern's emotionless is a given when we enter the story, and it would be disingenuous to change that over the course of 2 hours. Instead, we get some insights as to why he's that way, some questions as to why he's that way, and a good deal of empathy. There's also a good deal of Payne's unique brand of black humor, a handful of wonderful performances, and some excellent black and white cinematography.

The whole thing reminded me a little of The Last Picture Show (a personal favorite) in how the town itself is dead and has been for quite a while, it's just that the inhabitants don't know it yet. There's a certain sadness inherent watching these people "play out the string", and sometimes the only way to process it all is to laugh at their absurdness. In between all the long, open roads, endless acres of cornfields, and empty spaces, there are real lives being lived, however inconsequentuial they might be. To me, that's a sign of respect. It still all matters to them, which is all that matters.

This one will almost certainly end up in my year-end top 10.


Mon Nov 25, 2013 1:17 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
PeachyPete wrote:
Hello, Reelviews! How have you been? Good? Good. I've been swell, thanks for asking.

Nebraska

JB hasn't reviewed it, the AV Club found it disrespectful to Payne's hometown, and The Dissolve deemed it essential viewing. Considering those are the 3 main places I get my reviews from, I genuinely didn't know what to expect going into this one. After seeing the movie, I think the AV Club largely missed the point of the movie, in that it isn't interested in paying homage to a town or way of life, but in using that town to help a son learn about his distanced, emotionally absent father. It's a subtle movie about a man who's life has been full of hardship that's left him incapable as a father, only what we're privy to is the winding down of that life. Bruce Dern's emotionless is a given when we enter the story, and it would be disingenuous to change that over the course of 2 hours. Instead, we get some insights as to why he's that way, some questions as to why he's that way, and a good deal of empathy. There's also a good deal of Payne's unique brand of black humor, a handful of wonderful performances, and some excellent black and white cinematography.

The whole thing reminded me a little of The Last Picture Show (a personal favorite) in how the town itself is dead and has been for quite a while, it's just that the inhabitants don't know it yet. There's a certain sadness inherent watching these people "play out the string", and sometimes the only way to process it all is to laugh at their absurdness. In between all the long, open roads, endless acres of cornfields, and empty spaces, there are real lives being lived, however inconsequentuial they might be. To me, that's a sign of respect. It still all matters to them, which is all that matters.

This one will almost certainly end up in my year-end top 10.


Welcome back! Nebraska is currently only playing in a theater about 45 minutes away from me, and I wasn't sure if I wanted to make the trip to see it. Your likening of it to The Last Picture Show has peaked my interest.

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Mon Nov 25, 2013 2:19 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blonde Almond wrote:
Welcome back! Nebraska is currently only playing in a theater about 45 minutes away from me, and I wasn't sure if I wanted to make the trip to see it. Your likening of it to The Last Picture Show has peaked my interest.


Thanks! And it's nowhere near as good as Pete B's movie, but I obviously think it's an apt comparison. The tones are much, much different (anyone who's seen an Alexander Payne movie knows the exact sort of tone it will have), and the dying town idea that's central to The Last Picture Show isn't as important here, but it's still there. It's a very good movie, says me. Me also says you should check it out.


Mon Nov 25, 2013 3:51 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Blonde Almond wrote:
PeachyPete wrote:
Hello, Reelviews! How have you been? Good? Good. I've been swell, thanks for asking.

Nebraska

JB hasn't reviewed it, the AV Club found it disrespectful to Payne's hometown, and The Dissolve deemed it essential viewing. Considering those are the 3 main places I get my reviews from, I genuinely didn't know what to expect going into this one. After seeing the movie, I think the AV Club largely missed the point of the movie, in that it isn't interested in paying homage to a town or way of life, but in using that town to help a son learn about his distanced, emotionally absent father. It's a subtle movie about a man who's life has been full of hardship that's left him incapable as a father, only what we're privy to is the winding down of that life. Bruce Dern's emotionless is a given when we enter the story, and it would be disingenuous to change that over the course of 2 hours. Instead, we get some insights as to why he's that way, some questions as to why he's that way, and a good deal of empathy. There's also a good deal of Payne's unique brand of black humor, a handful of wonderful performances, and some excellent black and white cinematography.

The whole thing reminded me a little of The Last Picture Show (a personal favorite) in how the town itself is dead and has been for quite a while, it's just that the inhabitants don't know it yet. There's a certain sadness inherent watching these people "play out the string", and sometimes the only way to process it all is to laugh at their absurdness. In between all the long, open roads, endless acres of cornfields, and empty spaces, there are real lives being lived, however inconsequentuial they might be. To me, that's a sign of respect. It still all matters to them, which is all that matters.

This one will almost certainly end up in my year-end top 10.


Welcome back! Nebraska is currently only playing in a theater about 45 minutes away from me, and I wasn't sure if I wanted to make the trip to see it. Your likening of it to The Last Picture Show has peaked my interest.


*piqued

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Mon Nov 25, 2013 4:06 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
JamesKunz wrote:
Blonde Almond wrote:
PeachyPete wrote:
Hello, Reelviews! How have you been? Good? Good. I've been swell, thanks for asking.

Nebraska

JB hasn't reviewed it, the AV Club found it disrespectful to Payne's hometown, and The Dissolve deemed it essential viewing. Considering those are the 3 main places I get my reviews from, I genuinely didn't know what to expect going into this one. After seeing the movie, I think the AV Club largely missed the point of the movie, in that it isn't interested in paying homage to a town or way of life, but in using that town to help a son learn about his distanced, emotionally absent father. It's a subtle movie about a man who's life has been full of hardship that's left him incapable as a father, only what we're privy to is the winding down of that life. Bruce Dern's emotionless is a given when we enter the story, and it would be disingenuous to change that over the course of 2 hours. Instead, we get some insights as to why he's that way, some questions as to why he's that way, and a good deal of empathy. There's also a good deal of Payne's unique brand of black humor, a handful of wonderful performances, and some excellent black and white cinematography.

The whole thing reminded me a little of The Last Picture Show (a personal favorite) in how the town itself is dead and has been for quite a while, it's just that the inhabitants don't know it yet. There's a certain sadness inherent watching these people "play out the string", and sometimes the only way to process it all is to laugh at their absurdness. In between all the long, open roads, endless acres of cornfields, and empty spaces, there are real lives being lived, however inconsequentuial they might be. To me, that's a sign of respect. It still all matters to them, which is all that matters.

This one will almost certainly end up in my year-end top 10.


Welcome back! Nebraska is currently only playing in a theater about 45 minutes away from me, and I wasn't sure if I wanted to make the trip to see it. Your likening of it to The Last Picture Show has peaked my interest.


*piqued


Haha, I had this thought to, but decided NOT to be a dick and correct the esteemed Blonde Almond. It's good to see Kunz's anal retentiveness is still alive and well.


Mon Nov 25, 2013 4:19 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
Quote:
The whole thing reminded me a little of The Last Picture Show (a personal favorite)


coincidentally I rewatched Last Picture Show a few weeks before I saw Nebraska, and was pretty underwhelmed by the latter, while the former is close to perfect.
Maybe it was the crowd I saw it with(mostly made up of Guild members) laughing hysterically throughout which made me dislike the film. It felt like a bunch of elitist LA hipsters(if hipsters included those over 50) laughing at bunch of dumb midwestern hicks for 2 hours. Seriously I thought some of them were going to have a heart attack the way they went on. I should probably just stick to watching stuff on dvd, many of these LA crowds just ruin some movies for me. The Q&A with Dern and Squib after was a lot more enjoyable than the movie. Dern was incredibly charming and funny(maybe to garner some votes? I wonder how many times he's sat through Nebraska at this point, he was there beginning to end at my screening), and didn't get annoyed when asked if he had any good Hitchcock stories(he did)
Looks like Best Actor may be a battle between two 77 year olds(hard to believe Redford & Dern are the same age)


Mon Nov 25, 2013 6:02 pm
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Post Re: Last Movie You Watched
calvero wrote:
Quote:
The whole thing reminded me a little of The Last Picture Show (a personal favorite)


coincidentally I rewatched Last Picture Show a few weeks before I saw Nebraska, and was pretty underwhelmed by the latter, while the former is close to perfect.
Maybe it was the crowd I saw it with(mostly made up of Guild members) laughing hysterically throughout which made me dislike the film. It felt like a bunch of elitist LA hipsters(if hipsters included those over 50) laughing at bunch of dumb midwestern hicks for 2 hours. Seriously I thought some of them were going to have a heart attack the way they went on. I should probably just stick to watching stuff on dvd, many of these LA crowds just ruin some movies for me. The Q&A with Dern and Squib after was a lot more enjoyable than the movie. Dern was incredibly charming and funny(maybe to garner some votes? I wonder how many times he's sat through Nebraska at this point, he was there beginning to end at my screening), and didn't get annoyed when asked if he had any good Hitchcock stories(he did)
Looks like Best Actor may be a battle between two 77 year olds(hard to believe Redford & Dern are the same age)


I remember you saying before that The Last Picture Show would be in your personal top 20. It's an amazing movie.

Your Nebraska thoughts echo AA Dowd's review over at the AV Club. He felt like the movie was mean spirited and was more poking fun at the midwesterners than anything. I wonder if he also saw the movie with LA hipsters? My theater seemed full of people 50 and over. I think my girlfriend and I and the 2 guys sitting behind us were the youngest people there.

If you throw Ejiofor into the Best Actor race, it seems like we're looking at a bunch of performances that have a lot more to do with conveying emotion with your body and face as opposed to dialogue. That's a good thing, and I think all 3 are deserving. Should be interesting.


Mon Nov 25, 2013 6:26 pm
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