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Florida Politics 
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Post Florida Politics
A general lesson on Florida politics for those who might be wondering.

Florida is nationally known as a swing state. That means it could go either way depending on which side gets more people to the polls.

Florida went for Obama both times, for Carter once, for Clinton once and for LBJ once. But it also went for Reagan both times, George Bush senior once and Dubya at least once (taking 2000 out of that equation not because of the still uncertainty about that).

That's because Florida is evenly divided. I was looking at a map a friend put up showing last night's results by county. Looking at that map, one might be surprised that there aren't always mini civil wars erupting in this state.

A few years ago there was talk about splitting north and south Florida into two separate states. It never came to pass. But it wouldn't shock me if that started happening again.

On one side, Florida is full of younger voters and many (not all) of them skew to the left, especially on social issues. On the other side, you have many older people and retirees who lean more to the right (not all of them either). Hence, swing state.

Look at the defeated medical marijuana bill. A lot of younger liberal and libertarian leaning people were in favor of it (as were quite a few older ones too). However, there's also a large amount of socially conservative types who opposed it and more of them voted against it.

To illustrate further, refer back to what I said about Florida going for Bush in 2004 and then for Obama in both 2008 and 2012. Did a large amount of Republicans leave Florida and a large amount of Democrats replace them? No. More people move into Florida than out of it. Never mind the Hurricanes, the sweltering heat 11 months out of the year, the high crime rate in many areas. Florida will "always be better than a dying factory town on the shore of Lake Eerie" to paraphrase Carl Hiaasen.

So in some ways it isn't surprising that Rick Scott got elected for a second term. Overall, he hasn't done diddly to actually fix any of what's screwed up in the state. But people still voted for him. You had those who just went and pushed his name because of the R next to it (much like certain people push any name with a D next to it) and those who were uncertain of Crist. But consider that he beat Crist by a very slim margin (48.21% to Crist's 47,00%) and the overall vote count would suggest that voters weren't thrilled with either. But on the whole, more Scott supporters made it to the polls than Crist ones.
That's Florida politics.

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Wed Nov 05, 2014 11:51 am
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Post Re: Florida Politics
LOL. You Floridians are funny people.

Meanwhile, here in Maryland we just elected a Republican Governor. Crazy times we live in.

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Wed Nov 05, 2014 1:40 pm
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Post Re: Florida Politics
Things went fairly well for Illinois, most of the people I voted for got elected(Pat Quinn lost, but I wasn't that attached to him anyways) and I was particularly happy that the measure to raise the minimum wage to $10 an hour passed.

I hear Christ mainly lost because people saw him as an "opportunist"(he used to be a Republican, and in the documentary "Outrage" many people were pissed at him for his hypocritical anti-gay policies when he himself was most likely gay) and didn't consider him a "true" democrat.


Wed Nov 05, 2014 2:22 pm
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Post Re: Florida Politics
Yeah Crist was never quite believable. I remember back in 06 I was hoping for Jim Davis to win. Florida is actually my home state. I grew up in Tampa. Tampa, I can tell you, is conservative by default, but of course democrats are sprinkled everywhere. I've never spent any time in Miami, but I imagine it's a little more liberal down there. Florida is obviously a swing state, but overall it leans to the right.


Wed Nov 05, 2014 11:19 pm
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Post Re: Florida Politics
Jeff Wilder wrote:
A general lesson on Florida politics for those who might be wondering.

Florida is nationally known as a swing state. That means it could go either way depending on which side gets more people to the polls.

Florida went for Obama both times, for Carter once, for Clinton once and for LBJ once. But it also went for Reagan both times, George Bush senior once and Dubya at least once (taking 2000 out of that equation not because of the still uncertainty about that).

That's because Florida is evenly divided. I was looking at a map a friend put up showing last night's results by county. Looking at that map, one might be surprised that there aren't always mini civil wars erupting in this state.

A few years ago there was talk about splitting north and south Florida into two separate states. It never came to pass. But it wouldn't shock me if that started happening again.

On one side, Florida is full of younger voters and many (not all) of them skew to the left, especially on social issues. On the other side, you have many older people and retirees who lean more to the right (not all of them either). Hence, swing state.

Look at the defeated medical marijuana bill. A lot of younger liberal and libertarian leaning people were in favor of it (as were quite a few older ones too). However, there's also a large amount of socially conservative types who opposed it and more of them voted against it.

To illustrate further, refer back to what I said about Florida going for Bush in 2004 and then for Obama in both 2008 and 2012. Did a large amount of Republicans leave Florida and a large amount of Democrats replace them? No. More people move into Florida than out of it. Never mind the Hurricanes, the sweltering heat 11 months out of the year, the high crime rate in many areas. Florida will "always be better than a dying factory town on the shore of Lake Eerie" to paraphrase Carl Hiaasen.

So in some ways it isn't surprising that Rick Scott got elected for a second term. Overall, he hasn't done diddly to actually fix any of what's screwed up in the state. But people still voted for him. You had those who just went and pushed his name because of the R next to it (much like certain people push any name with a D next to it) and those who were uncertain of Crist. But consider that he beat Crist by a very slim margin (48.21% to Crist's 47,00%) and the overall vote count would suggest that voters weren't thrilled with either. But on the whole, more Scott supporters made it to the polls than Crist ones.
That's Florida politics.


Interesting.

What this says to me is that Florida is a populist voting block. And will vote for anyone who promises them the most jam on their bread.

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Thu Nov 06, 2014 6:29 am
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Post Re: Florida Politics
KWRoss wrote:
LOL. You Floridians are funny people.

Meanwhile, here in Maryland we just elected a Republican Governor. Crazy times we live in.


You're lucky it wasn't a democrat

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Thu Nov 06, 2014 6:31 am
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Post Re: Florida Politics
NotHughGrant wrote:
KWRoss wrote:
LOL. You Floridians are funny people.

Meanwhile, here in Maryland we just elected a Republican Governor. Crazy times we live in.


You're lucky it wasn't a democrat

Lucky how?


Thu Nov 06, 2014 2:38 pm
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Post Re: Florida Politics
Well, we're a traditionally blue state, so Democratic governors are usually the norm around here. Apparently the biggest reason behind Larry Hogan's victory was the promise of lower taxes. Maybe that's what NotHugh is getting at? Now, with a Republican Governor and an overwhelmingly Democratic House and Senate (9 out of 10 combined), get ready for gridlock in Annapolis.

Or maybe I'm way off. Who knows. I defer to Kunz for more specifics.

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Thu Nov 06, 2014 3:03 pm
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Post Re: Florida Politics
Gridlock isn't all bad.

In my work, I've found that if I can make everybody angry (or make everybody satisfied) at the same time, I've found the equitable solution.

If one person is hopping mad while the other is dancing with glee...huh.

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Thu Nov 06, 2014 3:13 pm
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Post Re: Florida Politics
Here's what I don't get about the American voter:

Let's use Kansas as an example. In 2010, the Republicans took over a supermajority in the legislature, the courts, and the governor's mansion. Since then they have run the state into the ground. Education and infrastructure is awful, job creation is anemic, the state is facing a massive budget shortfall, and the state's credit rating has been downgraded. Businesses are finding it hard to attract good, educated and qualified candidates because the state is so poorly run.

So knowing all this, what do voters in Kansas do? They re-elect the people who caused the mess. Democrats can't be blamed for any of it; they had no power in the state. I don't get why voters would re-elect those who screwed up the state so badly; I would understand if things were going well, but they're not. Winston Churchill once said that the best argument against democracy is a conversation with the average voter...there's part of me that thinks he was right.

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Thu Nov 06, 2014 10:29 pm
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Post Re: Florida Politics
Does anyone think debates are a bit overdone and play too large a role in our elections? It becomes a contest of "who won the debate" and distracts from the issues IMO. If anything, I think there should only be one presidential debate. Three October debates for a November election is a little bit silly, right? And let's be honest, the candidates have nothing to say to each other. If they've done their job, then they should have already communicated their stances clearly.


Fri Nov 07, 2014 2:54 am
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Post Re: Florida Politics
Because modern discourse has to be dumbed down to the lowest common denominator, or else you may offend someone somewhere, and we can't have that. Presidential debates, prime ministerial debates - it's the X-factor-fying of politics.

Look at popular American Presidents from the past. How many would win a debate on TV?

Teddy Roosevelt - No way, too plain speaking. Too masculine. He'd offend the wets.

FDR - No. Not healthy enough. He'd have to be helped on and off stage. No good in the age of America's got talent.

George Washington - by accounts a quiet and considered chap. No good for TV.

No doubt many more.

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Fri Nov 07, 2014 7:56 am
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Post Re: Florida Politics
KWRoss wrote:
Well, we're a traditionally blue state, so Democratic governors are usually the norm around here. Apparently the biggest reason behind Larry Hogan's victory was the promise of lower taxes. Maybe that's what NotHugh is getting at? Now, with a Republican Governor and an overwhelmingly Democratic House and Senate (9 out of 10 combined), get ready for gridlock in Annapolis.

Or maybe I'm way off. Who knows. I defer to Kunz for more specifics.


Nah, I was just getting at the Democrat good-Republican bad binary that Vexer perplexer is already warming up for above.

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Fri Nov 07, 2014 7:58 am
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Post Re: Florida Politics
Sexual Chocolate wrote:
Here's what I don't get about the American voter:

Let's use Kansas as an example. In 2010, the Republicans took over a supermajority in the legislature, the courts, and the governor's mansion. Since then they have run the state into the ground. Education and infrastructure is awful, job creation is anemic, the state is facing a massive budget shortfall, and the state's credit rating has been downgraded. Businesses are finding it hard to attract good, educated and qualified candidates because the state is so poorly run.

So knowing all this, what do voters in Kansas do? They re-elect the people who caused the mess. Democrats can't be blamed for any of it; they had no power in the state. I don't get why voters would re-elect those who screwed up the state so badly; I would understand if things were going well, but they're not. Winston Churchill once said that the best argument against democracy is a conversation with the average voter...there's part of me that thinks he was right.


I can't speak to the economic issues except to say that most republican politicians are subject to the same self-serving money grabbing that democratic politicians are. The tea party started gaining traction for this reason, but thus far appears to have been fended off by big money against them from both republican and democratic parties as well as through punitive and obstructive actions from the executive branch of the federal government. As far as education goes, I will note that Kansas appears to have adopted common core (hardly a republican led initiative) in 2010 prior to those elections. They tried to repeal it last year, but apparently fell a little short in the state house. Perhaps that is why their voters are doubling-down on the republicans. All speculation on my part since I don't live in Kansas.


Fri Nov 07, 2014 10:20 am
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Post Re: Florida Politics
Sexual Chocolate wrote:
Here's what I don't get about the American voter:

Let's use Kansas as an example. In 2010, the Republicans took over a supermajority in the legislature, the courts, and the governor's mansion. Since then they have run the state into the ground. Education and infrastructure is awful, job creation is anemic, the state is facing a massive budget shortfall, and the state's credit rating has been downgraded. Businesses are finding it hard to attract good, educated and qualified candidates because the state is so poorly run.

So knowing all this, what do voters in Kansas do? They re-elect the people who caused the mess. Democrats can't be blamed for any of it; they had no power in the state. I don't get why voters would re-elect those who screwed up the state so badly; I would understand if things were going well, but they're not. Winston Churchill once said that the best argument against democracy is a conversation with the average voter...there's part of me that thinks he was right.


I highly recommend reading Thomas Frank's book "What's The Matter With Kansas". Frank explains why so many people in that state vote Republican even though the GOP has for the most part done zilch to actually improve living conditions there and uses that as a microcosm for the rest of America.

Frank's overall point is that the far right wingers are able to win so often by framing issues in terms of a culture clash between small-town religious people and urban elites having contempt for those values.

The book shows that in addition to Kansas there are other areas throughout the south and Midwest that have been in decline for decades now. The Democratic Party has not been able to stop that decline and the GOP in its march to the extreme far right has made it a habit of taking people's minds off the real problems by getting them to focus on the moral decline of Urban areas and Hollywood.

So get a hold of that book. It's a good read even with a few flaws (some questionable economic thinking, a smug tone in a few spots)

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Fri Nov 07, 2014 11:08 am
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Post Re: Florida Politics
Sexual Chocolate wrote:
Here's what I don't get about the American voter:

Let's use Kansas as an example. In 2010, the Republicans took over a supermajority in the legislature, the courts, and the governor's mansion. Since then they have run the state into the ground. Education and infrastructure is awful, job creation is anemic, the state is facing a massive budget shortfall, and the state's credit rating has been downgraded. Businesses are finding it hard to attract good, educated and qualified candidates because the state is so poorly run.

So knowing all this, what do voters in Kansas do? They re-elect the people who caused the mess. Democrats can't be blamed for any of it; they had no power in the state. I don't get why voters would re-elect those who screwed up the state so badly; I would understand if things were going well, but they're not. Winston Churchill once said that the best argument against democracy is a conversation with the average voter...there's part of me that thinks he was right.


http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevemoore/ ... wo-states/

(A difference from the article here is that IL bounced their governor and KS retained theirs. Of course, with a DEM legislature don't know how much the GOP governor in IL will be able to do except halt any further bleeding expansion.)


Fri Nov 07, 2014 1:54 pm
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Post Re: Florida Politics
NotHughGrant wrote:
KWRoss wrote:
Well, we're a traditionally blue state, so Democratic governors are usually the norm around here. Apparently the biggest reason behind Larry Hogan's victory was the promise of lower taxes. Maybe that's what NotHugh is getting at? Now, with a Republican Governor and an overwhelmingly Democratic House and Senate (9 out of 10 combined), get ready for gridlock in Annapolis.

Or maybe I'm way off. Who knows. I defer to Kunz for more specifics.


Nah, I was just getting at the Democrat good-Republican bad binary that Vexer perplexer is already warming up for above.

Um, I never said anything like that, don't know where on earth you got that from :?

I most certainly do not think ALL Republicans are bad(as a matter of fact in my state I even voted for a few Republican candidates), just the ones that belong to the Tea Party.

So should I call you Grant Recant then? :lol:


Fri Nov 07, 2014 3:42 pm
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Post Re: Florida Politics
Vexer wrote:
NotHughGrant wrote:
KWRoss wrote:
Well, we're a traditionally blue state, so Democratic governors are usually the norm around here. Apparently the biggest reason behind Larry Hogan's victory was the promise of lower taxes. Maybe that's what NotHugh is getting at? Now, with a Republican Governor and an overwhelmingly Democratic House and Senate (9 out of 10 combined), get ready for gridlock in Annapolis.

Or maybe I'm way off. Who knows. I defer to Kunz for more specifics.


Nah, I was just getting at the Democrat good-Republican bad binary that Vexer perplexer is already warming up for above.

Um, I never said anything like that, don't know where on earth you got that from :?

I most certainly do not think ALL Republicans are bad(as a matter of fact in my state I even voted for a few Republican candidates), just the ones that belong to the Tea Party.

So should I call you Grant Recant then? :lol:


Vexer wrote:
Well I just read this story today and it's this very reason why I truly despise most Republicans.


That quote was from earlier in the year. Have you moderated some in that time??? Unless your position is "most Republicans belong to the Tea Party."


Fri Nov 07, 2014 3:53 pm
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Post Re: Florida Politics
I said MOST, not ALL, and by "most" I meant all Republicans affiliated with the Tea Party.


Sat Nov 08, 2014 1:29 am
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Post Re: Florida Politics
So just trying to refute NotHugh's "binary reference" here....what kind of Democrats do you "truly despise" and what % of total Democrats are they???


Sat Nov 08, 2014 2:18 am
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