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Industrial Hemp as an alternative biofuel to fossil fuels. 
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Post Industrial Hemp as an alternative biofuel to fossil fuels.
There is only one plant on the planet that I am aware of that could be mass-produced for fuel is hemp (which, despite having less than 1% THC, or in other words can't get you high if smoked, is banned by the U.S. federal government). Hemp biomass derived fuels and oils can replace every kind of fossil fuel energy product. The first car, Henry Ford's Model T, was made out of hemp plastics and ran on hemp fuel.

During transpiration, the growig hemp plants "breathe in" CO2 (carbon dioxide) to build cell structure; the leftover oxygen is breathed out, replenishing Earth's air supply. Then when the carbon rich hemp biomass is burned for energy the CO2 is released back into the air. The CO2 cycle comes close to ecological balance when the new fuel crop is grown the next year. Growing trees keeps 10 times the carbon dioxide in the Earth by keeping the infrastructure of the microbes, insects, plants, fungi, etc. alive for each tree. The older and bigger the tree, the more carbon dioxide is kept out of the atmostphere. Not all of the biomass crop gets converted into fuels. Some leaves, stalk stubble and all of the roots remain in the field as crop residues. This carbon rich organic matter adds to the soil fertility, and with each passing season a little more carbon dioxide from the air enters to soil, so the biomass fuel crops slowly reduce the amount of carbon dioxide from our polluted atmosphere.

Biomass conversion through pyrolysis (applying high heat to organic material in the absence of air or in reduced air) produces clean burning charcoal to replace coal. Sulfur emitted from coal fired boiler smokestacks is the primary cause of acid rain. Measuring acidity on the pH scale, the rainfall in New England often falls between household vinegar and lemon juice. This is bad for every cell membrane the rain comes in contact with, doing the most harm to the simplest life forms. Charcoal contains no sulfur, so when it is burned for industry no sulfur is emitted from the process.

The biomass "cracking" process also produces non-sulfur fuel oils capable of replacing fossil fuel oils such as diesel oil. And the net atmospheric CO2 doesn't rise when biomass derived fuel oils are burned.

Pyrolysis uses the same "cracking" technology employed by the petroleum industry in processing fossil fuels. The gasses that remain after the charcoal and fuel oils are extracted from hemp can be used for driving electric power co-generators, too!

This biomass conversion process can be adjusted to produce charcoal, methanol and fuel oils to process steam, as well as chemicals important to industry: acetone, ethyl acetate, tar, pitch and creosote.

The Ford Moto Co. successfully operated a biomass "cracking" plant in the 1930s at Iron Mountain, Michigan, using trees for cellulose fuels. (Earth-friendly hemp is at least four times as efficient as trees for fuel, and is sustainable.)

Hemp stems are 80% hurds (pulp byproduct after the hemp fiber is removed from the plant). Hemp hurds are 77% cellulose - a primary chemical feed stock (industrial raw material) used in the production of chemicals, plastics and fibers. Depending on which U.S. agricultural report is correct, an acre of full grown hemp plants can sustainably provide from four to 50 or even 100 times the cellulose found in cornstalks, kenaf, or sugar cane - the planet's next highest annual cellulose plants.

In most places, hemp can be harvested twice a year and, in warmer areas such as Southern California, Texas, Florida and the like, it could be a year-round crop. Hemp has a short growing season and can be planted after food crops have been harvested.

An independent, semi-rural network of efficient and autonomous farmers should become the key economic player in the production of energy in this country.

The United States government pays (in cash or in "kind") for farmers to refrain from growing on approximately 90 million acres of farmland each year, called the "soil bank." And 10-90 million acres of hemp or other woody annual biomass planted on this restricted, unplanted fallow farmland (our Soil Bank) would make energy a whole new ball game and be a real attempt at doing something to save the Earth. There are another 500 million marginal unplanted acres of farmland in America.

Each acre of hemp would yield 1,000 gallons of methanol. Fuels from hemp, along with the recyclingof paper, etc., would be enough to run American virtually without oil.

Any hemp is not limited to just fuels, but could replace wood paper and plastics as well.

But of course, because the cousin of hemp is marijuana, it must remain illegal. The logic behind it? Because law enforcement officials wouldn't be able to tell apart the hemp from the marijuana, despite the fact that hemp grows tall and thin, and marijuana is short and bushy. They are very easily identifiable. Really makes one begin to wonder whether cannabis' illegal status has anything to do with the fact that a close derivative of the plant poses a massive economic threat to big oil companies.

If anyone wants to check my sources....

- Progress in Biomass Conversion" Vol. 1, Sarkanen & Tillman, editors; Energy Farming in America, Osburn, Lynn, Access Unlimited.
- Popular Mechanics, Dec. 1941, "Pinch Hitters for Defense."
- The Emperor Wears No Clothes by Jack Herrer (which much of this post was copied from. All the verified sources are in the book).


Thu Jun 16, 2011 12:13 am
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Post Re: Industrial Hemp as an alternative biofuel to fossil fuels.
Timmy Shoes wrote:
There is only one plant on the planet that I am aware of that could be mass-produced for fuel is hemp (which, despite having less than 1% THC, or in other words can't get you high if smoked, is banned by the U.S. federal government). Hemp biomass derived fuels and oils can replace every kind of fossil fuel energy product. The first car, Henry Ford's Model T, was made out of hemp plastics and ran on hemp fuel.

During transpiration, the growig hemp plants "breathe in" CO2 (carbon dioxide) to build cell structure; the leftover oxygen is breathed out, replenishing Earth's air supply. Then when the carbon rich hemp biomass is burned for energy the CO2 is released back into the air. The CO2 cycle comes close to ecological balance when the new fuel crop is grown the next year. Growing trees keeps 10 times the carbon dioxide in the Earth by keeping the infrastructure of the microbes, insects, plants, fungi, etc. alive for each tree. The older and bigger the tree, the more carbon dioxide is kept out of the atmostphere. Not all of the biomass crop gets converted into fuels. Some leaves, stalk stubble and all of the roots remain in the field as crop residues. This carbon rich organic matter adds to the soil fertility, and with each passing season a little more carbon dioxide from the air enters to soil, so the biomass fuel crops slowly reduce the amount of carbon dioxide from our polluted atmosphere.

Biomass conversion through pyrolysis (applying high heat to organic material in the absence of air or in reduced air) produces clean burning charcoal to replace coal. Sulfur emitted from coal fired boiler smokestacks is the primary cause of acid rain. Measuring acidity on the pH scale, the rainfall in New England often falls between household vinegar and lemon juice. This is bad for every cell membrane the rain comes in contact with, doing the most harm to the simplest life forms. Charcoal contains no sulfur, so when it is burned for industry no sulfur is emitted from the process.

The biomass "cracking" process also produces non-sulfur fuel oils capable of replacing fossil fuel oils such as diesel oil. And the net atmospheric CO2 doesn't rise when biomass derived fuel oils are burned.

Pyrolysis uses the same "cracking" technology employed by the petroleum industry in processing fossil fuels. The gasses that remain after the charcoal and fuel oils are extracted from hemp can be used for driving electric power co-generators, too!

This biomass conversion process can be adjusted to produce charcoal, methanol and fuel oils to process steam, as well as chemicals important to industry: acetone, ethyl acetate, tar, pitch and creosote.

The Ford Moto Co. successfully operated a biomass "cracking" plant in the 1930s at Iron Mountain, Michigan, using trees for cellulose fuels. (Earth-friendly hemp is at least four times as efficient as trees for fuel, and is sustainable.)

Hemp stems are 80% hurds (pulp byproduct after the hemp fiber is removed from the plant). Hemp hurds are 77% cellulose - a primary chemical feed stock (industrial raw material) used in the production of chemicals, plastics and fibers. Depending on which U.S. agricultural report is correct, an acre of full grown hemp plants can sustainably provide from four to 50 or even 100 times the cellulose found in cornstalks, kenaf, or sugar cane - the planet's next highest annual cellulose plants.

In most places, hemp can be harvested twice a year and, in warmer areas such as Southern California, Texas, Florida and the like, it could be a year-round crop. Hemp has a short growing season and can be planted after food crops have been harvested.

An independent, semi-rural network of efficient and autonomous farmers should become the key economic player in the production of energy in this country.

The United States government pays (in cash or in "kind") for farmers to refrain from growing on approximately 90 million acres of farmland each year, called the "soil bank." And 10-90 million acres of hemp or other woody annual biomass planted on this restricted, unplanted fallow farmland (our Soil Bank) would make energy a whole new ball game and be a real attempt at doing something to save the Earth. There are another 500 million marginal unplanted acres of farmland in America.

Each acre of hemp would yield 1,000 gallons of methanol. Fuels from hemp, along with the recyclingof paper, etc., would be enough to run American virtually without oil.

Any hemp is not limited to just fuels, but could replace wood paper and plastics as well.

But of course, because the cousin of hemp is marijuana, it must remain illegal. The logic behind it? Because law enforcement officials wouldn't be able to tell apart the hemp from the marijuana, despite the fact that hemp grows tall and thin, and marijuana is short and bushy. They are very easily identifiable. Really makes one begin to wonder whether cannabis' illegal status has anything to do with the fact that a close derivative of the plant poses a massive economic threat to big oil companies.

If anyone wants to check my sources....

- Progress in Biomass Conversion" Vol. 1, Sarkanen & Tillman, editors; Energy Farming in America, Osburn, Lynn, Access Unlimited.
- Popular Mechanics, Dec. 1941, "Pinch Hitters for Defense."
- The Emperor Wears No Clothes by Jack Herrer (which much of this post was copied from. All the verified sources are in the book).


So called biofuels are actually horrible. They're inefficient and they cause price inflation. That's why we need to get rid of ethanol subsidies and stop forcing ethanol into the gas mixture, not do more with 'biofuels.'

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Mon Jun 20, 2011 8:30 am
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Post Re: Industrial Hemp as an alternative biofuel to fossil fuels.
Hydrogen is the future.
See the follwoing link
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AUurBnLbJw
This honda runs on hydrogen. This is the future.


Wed Jul 20, 2011 7:23 am
Post Re: Industrial Hemp as an alternative biofuel to fossil fuels.
thanks Timmy its very much informative to me hope you keep share such a nice info. 8-) :)


Sat Jul 30, 2011 6:45 am
Post Re: Industrial Hemp as an alternative biofuel to fossil fuels.
firefly wrote:
So called biofuels are actually horrible. They're inefficient and they cause price inflation. That's why we need to get rid of ethanol subsidies and stop forcing ethanol into the gas mixture, not do more with 'biofuels.'


Do you have any evidence to support these claims? Moreover, generally the discussion on "biofuels" doesn't usually include industrial hemp because of the issue of its legality. Those ethanol subsidies are for ethanol derived from corn, which is not a viable option as it can't be mass produced on the scale that hemp can. So corn as an alternative energy may be inefficient and cause price inflation, but hemp is a horse of a different color, and may be the key for ending dependance on foreign oil and would help re-oxidize the planet.


Tue Dec 13, 2011 9:17 pm
Post Re: Industrial Hemp as an alternative biofuel to fossil fuels.
p604 wrote:
Hydrogen is the future.
See the follwoing link
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AUurBnLbJw
This honda runs on hydrogen. This is the future.


"Because pure hydrogen does not occur naturally, it takes energy to manufacture it. There are different ways to manufacture it, such as, electrolysis and steam-methane reforming process. In electrolysis, electricity is run through water to separate the hydrogen and oxygen atoms. This method can be used by using wind, solar, geothermal, hydro, fossil fuels, biomass, and many other resources.[2]"

You need energy to make hydrogen. Therefore, industrial hemp (note that biomass is listed under the resources needed to separate the hydrogen and oxygen atoms) could be used in tandem with the hydrogen process. It's cleaner than fossil fuels, infinitely renewable, helps re-oxidize the atmosphere (which, for the record, would mean more hydrogen), and can be mass produced in practically every climate without need of having to wage wars overseas or disturbing natural landscapes for drilling.

source for the quote: http://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/consumer/hyd ... /index.htm


Tue Dec 13, 2011 9:23 pm
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