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Fahrenheit 451 and Ray Bradbury 
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Post Fahrenheit 451 and Ray Bradbury
Patrick wrote:
Major was talking about Fahrenheit 451 a book/movie about...what major was talking about. He covered it pretty well.


You know, I never really got the big deal over Fahrenheit 451 anyway. I never liked it. I thought it was...wait for it...overrated.

Sorry, it had to be done.


Wed Sep 16, 2009 11:08 pm
Post Re: August 30, 2009: "I Hate Vampires"
PeachyPete wrote:
Patrick wrote:
Major was talking about Fahrenheit 451 a book/movie about...what major was talking about. He covered it pretty well.


You know, I never really got the big deal over Fahrenheit 451 anyway. I never liked it. I thought it was...wait for it...overrated.

Sorry, it had to be done.


To curb the inevitable defense that will explode out of Peachy's post (alliteration is erotic, no?) I'm going to further smudge this vampire thread with a wholehearted agreement. Fahrenheit 451 is no better than overrated. It always struck me as a fundamental weakness that, in the end, society's future was reliant upon people who had memorized the content of books without the actual appreciation of their content. It dilutes Bradbury's point, does it not? But that's Bradbury for you. He's had a long career writing some just plain terrible stuff. Fahrenheit 451, as much of a big mediocre nothing as it is, still ranks highly in his terrible canon. His little penny dreadfuls won't be remembered in 100 years.


Thu Sep 17, 2009 12:51 am
Post Re: August 30, 2009: "I Hate Vampires"
majoraphasia wrote:
PeachyPete wrote:
Patrick wrote:
Major was talking about Fahrenheit 451 a book/movie about...what major was talking about. He covered it pretty well.


You know, I never really got the big deal over Fahrenheit 451 anyway. I never liked it. I thought it was...wait for it...overrated.

Sorry, it had to be done.


To curb the inevitable defense that will explode out of Peachy's post (alliteration is erotic, no?) I'm going to further smudge this vampire thread with a wholehearted agreement. Fahrenheit 451 is no better than overrated. It always struck me as a fundamental weakness that, in the end, society's future was reliant upon people who had memorized the content of books without the actual appreciation of their content. It dilutes Bradbury's point, does it not? But that's Bradbury for you. He's had a long career writing some just plain terrible stuff. Fahrenheit 451, as much of a big mediocre nothing as it is, still ranks highly in his terrible canon. His little penny dreadfuls won't be remembered in 100 years.


In all seriousness I do find Fahrenheit 451 fairly unremarkable. I wouldn't call it bad, but I think Vexer's favorite term is appropriate in this case. I'm completely unfamiliar with Bradbury's other stuff, and from what you've said, that seems to be a good thing.

I don't know how comfortable I am with another male commenting on the eroticism of the phrase "Peachy's post". I guess I can take solace in the fact that you didn't use a winky smiley afterwards. It's only gay if you follow it up with a wink.


Thu Sep 17, 2009 2:38 pm
Post Re: Fahrenheit 451 and Ray Bradbury
Geez, am I the only one here who really likes Ray Bradbury?

Fahrenheit 451 is not my favorite of his, but I did enjoy it. A little heavyhanded, maybe, but something Bradbury felt strongly about and probably tried a bit too hard to get his point across.

My all-time favorite Bradbury (and one of my favorite books ever) is Something Wicked This Way Comes. To me, there's nothing better. I think it's very well written, full of wonderful imagery and a great message. Maybe it's a nostalgia thing with me -- one of the first "grown up" books I ever read, and it just hit all the right notes over 25 years ago. I still re-read it every couple of years.

I also really like Dandelion Wine, and recently read Farewell, Summer, which I found to be a worthy successor. Martian Chronicles was not as enjoyable, and I struggled to finish it.

I guess his writing's not for everyone. It can be fluttery and verbose, and he goes a little overboard with the descriptive passages and metaphor at times, but it's a nice juxtaposition to some other writers that are much more sparing.

But that's just me.


Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:39 am
Post Re: Fahrenheit 451 and Ray Bradbury
And I just got caught up on all the vampire controversy.

Best. Thread. Ever.

Poor Vexer.


Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:57 am
Post Re: Fahrenheit 451 and Ray Bradbury
Great thread idea, Peachy!

I've been meaning to check out Bradbury for some time now, but I keep putting it off because I get this weird feeling I'd hate him. I have nothing to base this one, it's just...a vibe. Same for Ender's Game. Sounds like something I'd normally adore, but something doesn't feel right.


Fri Sep 18, 2009 6:11 pm
Post Re: Fahrenheit 451 and Ray Bradbury
I personally loved Fahrenheit 451, still do. Unfortunately, most of its defenders over the years (including me) have admired it for different reasons than the ones Bradbury intended.

http://www.laweekly.com/2007-05-31/news ... terpreted/

Bradbury fail.


Sat Sep 19, 2009 3:03 pm
Post Re: Fahrenheit 451 and Ray Bradbury
GunBehindTheToilet wrote:
I personally loved Fahrenheit 451, still do. Unfortunately, most of its defenders over the years (including me) have admired it for different reasons than the ones Bradbury intended.

http://www.laweekly.com/2007-05-31/news ... terpreted/

Bradbury fail.



Interesting link. Thanks!

But when you say "Bradbury fail," what do you mean? That he's wrong, or that the story's less effective with this interpretation?

This adds a new dimension to the book for me, and actually makes more sense. It gets rid of the dilution that Major mentioned in his post -- the characters memorize the books to preserve them for future generations. The appreciation of content should come from each individual reader, as they interpret the books for themselves.


Sat Sep 19, 2009 9:38 pm
Post Re: Fahrenheit 451 and Ray Bradbury
HomerJ wrote:
GunBehindTheToilet wrote:
I personally loved Fahrenheit 451, still do. Unfortunately, most of its defenders over the years (including me) have admired it for different reasons than the ones Bradbury intended.

http://www.laweekly.com/2007-05-31/news ... terpreted/

Bradbury fail.



Interesting link. Thanks!

But when you say "Bradbury fail," what do you mean? That he's wrong, or that the story's less effective with this interpretation?

This adds a new dimension to the book for me, and actually makes more sense. It gets rid of the dilution that Major mentioned in his post -- the characters memorize the books to preserve them for future generations. The appreciation of content should come from each individual reader, as they interpret the books for themselves.


I personally think that a story about censorship and freedom of speech is more meaningful than one that expounds the evils of television. I don't think he would have earned nearly as much praise for that particular interpretation, and probably would have kept it to myself if that was my true intent.

Hence fail.


Sat Sep 19, 2009 11:59 pm
Post Re: Fahrenheit 451 and Ray Bradbury
GunBehindTheToilet wrote:
HomerJ wrote:
GunBehindTheToilet wrote:
I personally loved
Fahrenheit 451, still do. Unfortunately, most of its defenders over the
years (including me) have admired it for different reasons than the
ones Bradbury intended.

http://www.laweekly.com/2007-05-31/news ... terpreted/

Bradbury fail.



Interesting link. Thanks!

But
when you say "Bradbury fail," what do you mean? That he's wrong, or
that the story's less effective with this interpretation?

This
adds a new dimension to the book for me, and actually makes more sense.
It gets rid of the dilution that Major mentioned in his post -- the
characters memorize the books to preserve them for future generations.
The appreciation of content should come from each individual reader, as
they interpret the books for themselves.


I personally
think that a story about censorship and freedom of speech is more
meaningful than one that expounds the evils of television. I don't
think he would have earned nearly as much praise for that particular
interpretation, and probably would have kept it to myself if that was
my true intent.

Hence fail.


Authorial trespassing strikes again! A great, great link from GunBehindTheToilet that everyone should check out if they're interested in watching an author take a walk all over his most celebrated work. Even if Bradbury were to come out and declare his novel was really about the deliciousness of cheese pizzas he should allow for the general consensus as one among many correct readings and not use a hideous word like "misinterpreted" to effectively brush aside a point many readers wouldn't have embraced if it weren't for his novel. If anything, his words seem to indicate that his audience has more capability than he himself.


Sun Sep 20, 2009 1:21 am
Post Re: Fahrenheit 451 and Ray Bradbury
majoraphasia wrote:
Authorial trespassing strikes again! A great, great link from GunBehindTheToilet that everyone should check out if they're interested in watching an author take a walk all over his most celebrated work. Even if Bradbury were to come out and declare his novel was really about the deliciousness of cheese pizzas he should allow for the general consensus as one among many correct readings and not use a hideous word like "misinterpreted" to effectively brush aside a point many readers wouldn't have embraced if it weren't for his novel. If anything, his words seem to indicate that his audience has more capability than he himself.


I wonder if Mr. Bradbury always intended his book to be "about" television. It just seems curious to me that he would wait so many years before "correcting" people.

Post #1151 was by no means a bad one, but for me it just didn't live up to the hype. I'm keeping my fingers crossed for #1201.


Mon Sep 21, 2009 12:40 am
Post Re: Fahrenheit 451 and Ray Bradbury
Of all the books I own, the most by a single author would be those of Bradbury. "Fahrenheit 451" is not one that I own, however. I was forced to read it for a high school lit class, and, much like any force-fed food, I don't want it anymore. However "October Country", "Martian Chronicals", "Illustrated Man", "Something Wicked.." were all wonderful reads. I've reread MC several times, and I'll do it again. I would only recommend it to someone who has very similar tastes to my own. That's not a long list of people.


Thu Sep 24, 2009 9:16 am
Post Re: Fahrenheit 451 and Ray Bradbury
Awf Hand wrote:
Of all the books I own, the most by a single author would be those of Bradbury. "Fahrenheit 451" is not one that I own, however. I was forced to read it for a high school lit class, and, much like any force-fed food, I don't want it anymore. However "October Country", "Martian Chronicals", "Illustrated Man", "Something Wicked.." were all wonderful reads. I've reread MC several times, and I'll do it again. I would only recommend it to someone who has very similar tastes to my own. That's not a long list of people.

I also own more Bradbury books than any other author's. Mostly short story collections. His sci-fi short stories are incredibly creative and thought-inspiring.
I admit I have not many of his most famous works such as The Martian Chronicles or Fahrenheit 451.


Thu Sep 24, 2009 10:03 pm
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